Pueblo

Displaying 701 - 725 of 906 records
The Indian Helper (Vol. 2, No. 34)
April 1, 1887

The first page opened with a poem titled “The Boy and the Bird,” author undetermined. The next article was titled “How the Indian School Girls in Sitka, Alaska, Got Ahead of the Indian Boys,” which concluded on the fourth page. Page two contained articles about returned students, John Davis (Pueblo) writing from his country home, and a piece…

Nation:
Format:
Newspapers
Repository:
Dickinson College Archives & Special Collections
The Indian Helper (Vol. 2, No. 35)
April 8, 1887

The first page opened with a poem titled “To Tell a Good House-Keeper,” reprinted from The New Moon. Also on the page was an account by Johnnie Schmoker about bird hunting at the Cheyenne and Arapaho School in Oklahoma titled “INCIDENTS OF SCHOOL WORK AMONG THE CHEYENNES AND ARAPAHOES, IN THE INDIAN TERRITORY, WHEN THEY WERE REALLY…

Format:
Newspapers
Repository:
Dickinson College Archives & Special Collections
The Indian Helper (Vol. 2, No. 51)
July 29, 1887

This issue opened with a poem titled “THROUGH AND THROUGH” reprinted from Scattered Seeds.” Also found on that page was “MISS WILSON’S ACCOUNT OF HER TRIP TO SCOTLAND,” a travelogue of the teacher and her sister’s visit by ocean liner to Scotland and Ireland and back. Page two opened with “A Child’s Wise Speech,” that described the…

Nation:
Format:
Newspapers
Repository:
Dickinson College Archives & Special Collections
The Indian Helper (Vol. 3, No. 16)
November 25, 1887

The first page opened with a poem, "Thanksgiving Turkey," a play on the letters in the word "Turkey" followed by a description of the Acoma Pueblo by student Annie Thomas, entitled "A Queer Place To Live." This also was a subject of the article written about the monthly exhibition on page 3. The second page included news of students who…

Format:
Newspapers
Repository:
Dickinson College Archives & Special Collections
The Indian Helper (Vol. 3, No. 33)
March 30, 1888

The first page opened with the poem, " A Proverb," followed by Jemima Wheelock's (Oneida) report of "Our Wilmington Trip," about a group of students traveling to Delaware where they stayed with families before they headed to Philadelphia with Capt. Pratt and Miss Leverett.  They visited John Wannamaker's Store, the zoo, an iron factory and the…

Nation:
Format:
Newspapers
Topics:
Repository:
Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 3, No. 47)
July 6, 1888

The first page opened with a poem by Sarah E. Eastman reprinted from “Golden Days,” titled “If! If!” followed by the reprinted letter from a Carlisle Indian School student on Outing called “She Wants a Higher Education.” The last piece on the page continues on the fourth page called “A Modern Pueblo” about the process by which a progressive…

Nation:
Format:
Newspapers
Repository:
Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 4, No. 1)
August 17, 1888

The first page opened with the poem, “What the Flowers Said,” followed by an article reprinted from The Baltimorean, titled "Men Who Were Laughed At,” about how technologies were first spurned. Page two featured several news reports about the band, outing experiences, news from the Rosebud Sioux and Osage Agencies, and an entire column…

Nation:
Format:
Newspapers
Repository:
Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 4, No. 24)
February 1, 1889

The first page began with an untitled poem that opened with the first line “We can never be too careful,” followed by “Which Would You Rather Be a Spider or a Fly? / The White Man Like a Spider,” an account of Mr. Seger’s description of the idiosyncrasies of language translation. It continued on the fourth page. Page two featured news articles…

Format:
Newspapers
Repository:
Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 4, No. 33)
April 5, 1889

The first page began with a poem titled, “The Tongue,” followed by the Man-on-the-band-stand’s discussion in “Never Before,” that explained that a horde of boys would be marching east toward opportunity but a horde of boys would be marching west toward degradation, which he described as “evil practices and rot.” The page continued with “The…

Nation:
Format:
Newspapers
Topics:
Repository:
Dickinson College Archives & Special Collections
The Indian Helper (Vol. 4, No. 34)
April 12, 1889

The first page began with a poem titled, “Dr. Nature’s Prescription,” followed by “How One of the Printer Boys Came Out Ahead,” which described how a printer, against the advice of his instructor, was able to repair faulty equipment using his own problem solving technique. This was followed by a short blurb warning against smoking. Page two…

Nation:
Format:
Newspapers
Repository:
Dickinson College Archives & Special Collections
The Indian Helper (Vol. 4, No. 38)
May 10, 1889

The first page began with an untitled poem with a first line of “God gave us hands – one left one right,” followed by an article describing the seeds of success titled “When It Tells.” The next article was about the Ayan Indians who fish salmon on the Yukon River titled “Sharp-sighted Indians,” followed by a treatise on politeness. Page two…

Nation:
Format:
Newspapers
Repository:
Dickinson College Archives & Special Collections
The Indian Helper (Vol. 4, No. 42)
June 7, 1889

The first page opened with a poem by Susan Coolidge titled “New Every Morning,” followed by a letter from Ernie Black (Cheyenne) titled “News from our Cheyenne and Arapahoe Boys.” Also on the page was a reprint from The Sunday School Times titled “We Must Be Run Through a Mill.” Page two opened with a quote from Paul Boynton (Arapho)…

Format:
Newspapers
Repository:
Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 4, No. 44)
June 21, 1889

The first page opened with a poem by Fannie Bolton titled “It is Time,” followed by “The Experience of a Bull: A Child’s Version of the Recent Flood at Lewistown,” followed by “A Busy Indian Boy in the Country” which was Wallace Scott’s (Pueblo) description of his farm experience in Bucks County. Page two featured a notice of the new premium…

Format:
Newspapers
Repository:
Dickinson College Archives & Special Collections
The Indian Helper (Vol. 4, No. 48)
July 19, 1889

The first page opened with a poem “Cherries Are Ripe,” from Youth’s Companion, followed by a story titled “Sebastian’s Opportunity” about the training of a painter named Sebastian Gomez, a.k.a. “The mulatto of Murillo.” Page two featured a piece called "In Vacation," in which the Man-On-The-Band-Stand invited students to share their…

Format:
Newspapers
Repository:
Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 4, No. 50)
August 2, 1889

The first page opened with a poem “Little Moccasined Feet,” followed by the article titled “How Did There Come to be Any Coal?” that described the origin of coal. Page two opened with “Small Beginnings,” a litany of how Benjamin Franklin, Columbus, and others had their origins. “How One Conquers,” followed by “Luck and Labor,” as well as…

Format:
Newspapers
Repository:
Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 5, No. 18)
December 20, 1889

The first page opened with a poem titled "A Christmas Carol by Eleanor W.F. Bates in Home Magazine. Next came a new installment of the series titled “How An Indian Girl Might Tell Her Own Story if She Had the Chance: Founded on Actual Observations of the Man-on-the-band-stand’s Chief Clerk” (continued from the previous week). In this…

Format:
Newspapers
Repository:
Cumberland County Historical Society
Souvenir of the Carlisle Indian School, 1902
1902

A souvenir booklet from the Carlisle Indian School, published for their 23rd year.  A short description of the aims and goals of the school is presented.  Images of students as they first arrived, as well as important visiting chiefs, are given, as are before and after images including those of Tom Torlino.  Extracurricular groups, school staff…

Format:
Pamphlet
Repository:
Dickinson College Archives & Special Collections
The Indian Craftsman (Vol. 1, No. 3)
April 1909

The opening article praised the work of Francis E. Leupp, Commissioner of Indian Affairs. The following article, pulled from the Philadelphia Ledger, featured two Carlisle students. Thomas Saul (Wanyeya) and Reuben Charles (Gwee-yeh-is) were awarded the Gillespie Scholarship and were being trained in the arts. Next, C. J. Crandall…

Nation:
Format:
Magazines
Repository:
Dickinson College Archives & Special Collections
The Red Man (Vol. 8, No. 9)
May 1916

The legend of Queen Allaquippa is presented.  A series of resolutions on the Seminoles, made by the Tampa Woman's Club, support the Seminole people's attempts to regain land in Florida.  Lace making among the Pueblo Nation is discussed.  An article from the New York Evening Post about the usefulness of Indian education, written by…

Nation:
Format:
Magazines
Repository:
Dickinson College Archives & Special Collections
Benjamin Thomas, Mary Perry, and John Menual Chaves [version 1], c.1880

Studio portrait of Benjamin Thomas (standing at left), Mary Perry (seated in center), and John Menual Chaves (seated at right). The two boys are both wearing school uniforms.

Format:
Glass Plate Negative
Repository:
National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Benjamin Thomas, Mary Perry, and John Menual Chaves [version 2], c.1880

Studio portrait of Benjamin Thomas (standing at left), Mary Perry (seated in center), and John Menual Chaves (standing at right). The boys are both wearing school uniforms. Perry is in a school-issued print dress.

Format:
Photographic Print, B&W
Repository:
Cumberland County Historical Society
Four Pueblo Children from Zuni, New Mexico, c.1880

Studio portrait of Mary Ealy (standing at left), Jennie Hammaker (standing at right), Frank Cushing (sitting at left), and Taylor Ealy (sitting at right), all wearing native clothing. 

The printed caption on the reverse side reads:

No 20.   
Teai-e-se-u-lu-ti-wa - Frank Cushing.

Tra-wa-ea-tsa-…

Format:
Photographic Print, B&W
Repository:
Dickinson College Archives & Special Collections
Frank Cushing, Taylor Ealy, Mary Ealy, and Jennie Hammaker [version 1], c.1880

Studio portrait of Frank Cushing (standing at left), Taylor Ealy (standing at right), Mary Ealy (seated in swing at left), and Jennie Hammaker (seated at right), all wearing school uniforms. 

Format:
Glass Plate Negative
Repository:
National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Frank Cushing, Taylor Ealy, Mary Ealy, and Jennie Hammaker [version 2], c.1880

Studio portrait of Frank Cushing (standing at left), Taylor Ealy (standing at right), Mary Ealy (seated in swing at left), and Jennie Hammaker (seated at right), all dressed in school uniforms.  

Format:
Photographic Print, B&W
Repository:
Cumberland County Historical Society
Sheldon Jackson, Harvey Townsend, and John Shields [version 1], c.1880

Studio portrait of Sheldon Jackson (left), Harvey Townsend (center), and John Shields (right), all wearing native clothing. 

Nation:
Format:
Glass Plate Negative
Repository:
National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution