Printing Department

Displaying 1 - 25 of 78 records
Eadle Keatah Toh (Vol. 1, No. 1)
January 1880

The first page opened with an article titled "THE INDIAN TRAINING SCHOOL," that described the progress of the school, its Christian methods, the work of the former Ft. Marion prisoners of war preparing buildings for use, the importance of the town Sunday Schools, the school curriculum that emphasized farmwork for boys and housekeeping for girls…

Format:
Newspapers
Repository:
National Archives and Records Administration
School News (Vol. 1, No. 3)
August 1880

An excursion to Warm Spring opened this edition, titled “The Camp at the Warm Springs” by John Downing (Cherokee). They hiked all day until they reached the Springs, picking black berries along the way and at one point believing they had gotten lost. This proceeded an editorial on the benefits of sending Indian children to school, which was…

Format:
Newspapers
Repository:
Cumberland County Historical Society
The School News (Vol. 1, No. 11)
April 1881

The opening article was written by Michael Burns (Apache), and focused on “The Indian Question.” In it he explains how many Indians falsely believe that white men are wiser simply because they are born white, and argues that their wisdom comes not from their skin color, but from more easily accessed education. The second page gives some…

Format:
Newspapers
Repository:
Cumberland County Historical Society
The School News (Vol. 2, No. 3)
August 1881

The August edition opens with an article on the need to be useful the Carlisle Children feel, and how badly the writer felt when unable to work while sick. It continued onto page four. Page two brings Samuel Townsend (Pawnee) stepping down as editor with Charles Kihega (Iowa) taking his place. There is also pieces on the possibility of moving…

Nation:
Format:
Newspapers
Repository:
Cumberland County Historical Society
The School News (Vol. 2, No. 9)
February 1882

The first page had two articles on it. The first was by Johnson Lane about George Washington. The second was about various lost people and animals that the writer had met. Page two opens with Charles Kihega (Iowa) describing his tribe before and after coming under control of the agency. Another article talked about the Northern Arapahoe chief…

Nation:
Format:
Newspapers
Repository:
Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 1, No. 21 & No. 22)
January 8, 1886

The first page opened with a poem titled “Smile Whenever You Can," followed by a lesson titled, "What Is Polite?" and a description of the life cycles of certain mammals. Page two featured the "Forty-Ninth Congress" civics lesson comparing government to the Indian school’s debating clubs in which Congress would be debating the question of…

Format:
Newspapers
Repository:
Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 1, No. 25)
January 29, 1886

The first page opened with a poem titled "Who Was He?" asking students to come up with an answer for a prize of 25 cents. Also on the first page was a list of twelve steps for "How to Succeed." Page two included news briefs about the weather and keeping warm, President Cleveland’s activities, a West Virginia coal mine accident, sloppy marching…

Format:
Newspapers
Repository:
Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 1, No. 30)
March 5, 1886

The first page opened with a poem titled "Exhibition Night: By The-Man-on-the-Band-Stand's Wife." There were also several brief articles about high winds in Philadelphia, heavy snows in Quebec, the fate of a ship that ran aground during a voyage between Boston and Liverpool, a birthday party for Emperor William (Wilhelm I) of Germany, the…

Format:
Newspapers
Repository:
Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 2, No. 14)
November 12, 1886

The first page opened with a poem titled "A Fourteen-Year-Old Girl's Good Advice," followed by an article called "The Menomonees and Pottawatomies Dance: A Story by Lucy Jordan, Stockbridge, a pupil from Wisconsin," that told of an 1882 visit by dancers to her home agency in Keshena, Wisconsin. Page two included an offer of photographs for new…

Format:
Newspapers
Repository:
Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 3, No. 16)
November 25, 1887

The first page opened with a poem, "Thanksgiving Turkey," a play on the letters in the word "Turkey" followed by a description of the Acoma Pueblo by student Annie Thomas, entitled "A Queer Place To Live." This also was a subject of the article written about the monthly exhibition on page 3. The second page included news of students who…

Format:
Newspapers
Repository:
Dickinson College Archives & Special Collections
The Indian Helper (Vol. 3, No. 49)
July 20, 1888

The first page opened with the poem “Be True” followed by an article titled “A Carlisle Teacher on the Big Ocean,” about a trip aboard the Steamer Aurania dated July 6th, 1888 written for the Man-on-the-band-stand by “A Carlisle,” aka Miss Lowe. The article concluded on the fourth page. Page two featured a variety of small newsy paragraphs that…

Nation:
Format:
Newspapers
Repository:
Dickinson College Archives & Special Collections
The Indian Helper (Vol. 4, No. 12)
November 2, 1888

The first page opened with the poem, “Little Helpers,” reprinted from the Sunday School Times. Next came a piece titled “Environment,” the answer to the previously posted word story, followed by “No Time to Read?” about the importance of reading which continued on the fourth page. Page two reported a talk by Rev. Mr. Wilson about the…

Format:
Newspapers
Repository:
Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 4, No. 17)
December 7, 1888

This issue opened with a poem titled “HOW," by John Boyle O'Reilly, followed by news from a letter from Carlisle alumnus Samuel Townsend (Pawnee), a student at Marietta College. Page two included news items about Congress convening, Nancy Cornelius (Oneida) attending the Woman's National Indian Association, new arrivals, "Thanksgiving Echoes…

Nation:
Format:
Newspapers
Repository:
Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 4, No. 27)
February 22, 1889

The first page began with the heading, “February 22,” followed by poems and articles about George Washington and his birthday. Also on the page was a piece called “Do Indian Boys Have It?” about the pitfalls of self-conceit. Page two included many small articles that included an update of area postal routes, a description of Eugene Tahkapeur’s…

Nation:
Format:
Newspapers
Repository:
Dickinson College Archives & Special Collections
The Indian Helper (Vol. 4, No. 32)
March 29, 1889

The first page opened with a poem "The Voice That Wins Its Way" contributed by Hannah E. Wilson, followed by a piece called "From John Dixon" which was reprinted from the Albuquerque Indian School where Dixon (Pueblo) was employed as a carpenter and translator for Indian school recruitment. The article continued on page four. Page two offered “…

Format:
Newspapers
Repository:
Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 4, No. 36)
April 26, 1889

The first page opened with a poem "The Printer-Boy Tramp” by Will Carleton, followed by “Encouraging Prospects” about Luther Kuhns at the Pawnee Agency. Next came “A Man Who was not Afraid to Work” on how General Washington set an example for his corporal. Also on the page was an article titled “Easter Eggs in Washington.” Page two contained a…

Nation:
Format:
Newspapers
Repository:
Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 5, No. 11)
November 1, 1889

The first page opened with a poem by Ella Wheeler with the first line "Oh What Am I but an Engine Shod” followed by the next installment of the series titled “How An Indian Girl Might Tell Her Own Story if She Had the Chance: Founded on Actual Observations of the Man-on-the-band-stand’s Chief Clerk” (continued from the previous week). The story…

Format:
Newspapers
Repository:
Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 5, No. 12)
November 8, 1889

The first page opened with a poem by E.G. titled "U.S.I.D.” followed by the next installment of the series titled “How An Indian Girl Might Tell Her Own Story if She Had the Chance: Founded on Actual Observations of the Man-on-the-band-stand’s Chief Clerk” (continued from the previous week). The story continued on the fourth page. Page two…

Format:
Newspapers
Repository:
Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 5, No. 15)
November 29, 1889

The first page opened with a query titled "Who is that Man-on-the-band-stand?” followed by E.G.’s poem, “The Man-on-the-band-stand.” Next came a new installment of the series titled “How An Indian Girl Might Tell Her Own Story if She Had the Chance: Founded on Actual Observations of the Man-on-the-band-stand’s Chief Clerk” (continued from the…

Format:
Newspapers
Repository:
Cumberland County Historical Society
Ten male student printers [version 1], c.1885

Studio portrait of ten male students in uniform. 

The Cumberland County Historical Society's copy of this image identifies them as "Printer Boys." On one copy of the image they are identified as, left to right: William Butcher, Benajah Miles, Paul Boynton, Richard Davis, Samuel Townsend, Cyrus Fell Star, Chester Cornelius, Benjamin…

Format:
Glass Plate Negative
Repository:
National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Thirteen male student printers [version 1], c.1886

Studio portrait of thirteen male students, all wearing school uniforms. The caption of this and other copies identifies them as working in the print shop. 

Other copies identify the students. They are: 

1. Bennie Thomas, 2. Lorenzo Martinez, 3. Willie Butcher, 4. C. P. Cornelius, 5. Dennison Wheelock, 6. Samuel Townsend, 7.…

Format:
Glass Plate Negative
Repository:
National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Twenty-three male student printers [version 1], 1894

Studio portrait of twenty-three male students. The caption for this image, as well as the other copies, identifies them as students who worked in the print shop and gives a date of 1894. Other copies identify the sitters. They are: 

1st. Tier (presumably the back row), Robert Hudson, Leroy W. Kennedy, Leander Gansworth, William Denomie,…

Format:
Glass Plate Negative
Repository:
National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Copy of First School Newspaper and Report of School Progress
January 25, 1880

Richard Henry Pratt forwards to Commissioner of Indian Affairs Ezra Hayt a copy of the first issue of Eadle Keatah Toh, the first newspaper published at the Carlisle Indian School. Pratt notes that more donations will soon fund the purchase of a better printing press, and discusses other topics including new student uniforms and the…

Format:
Letters/Correspondence, Newspapers and Magazines
Repository:
National Archives and Records Administration
Request for Blank Letter Paper in the Future
September 17, 1880

Richard Henry Pratt acknowledges receipt of two packages of letter paper with "United States Indian Service" printed on the top of each page. Pratt requests that, in the future, he receive blank letter paper, so he can use the Carlisle Indian School's print shop to print a unique heading.

Note: This item was copied from U.S. National…

Format:
Letters/Correspondence
Repository:
National Archives and Records Administration
Request for President to Subscribe to Indian Helper
November 22, 1886

George S. Holloway of the Henry Mission Band of the Princeton Presbyterian Church of Philadelphia writes to President Grover Cleveland asking him to subscribe to the Indian Helper published at the Carlisle Indian School.

Format:
Letters/Correspondence
Repository:
National Archives and Records Administration