Pueblo

Displaying 676 - 700 of 906 records
Joseph Johnson Student Information Card
Date of Entry:

Student information card of Pueblo Nation, who entered the school on October 7, 1914 and died on April 22, 1916 while attending the school.

Note: Johnson's student file indicates his body was returned home to his family for burial; he is not buried in the cemetery on the school grounds. 

Nation:
Repository:
National Archives and Records Administration
Juan Pablo Routzon Student File
Date of Entry:

Student file of Juan Pablo Routzon, a member of the Pueblo Nation, who entered the school on October 7, 1914. No departure date is given. The file contains student information cards, an application for enrollment, a federal federal financial aid form, an outing evaluation, certificates of promotion, an outing record, and correspondence. The…

Nation:
Repository:
National Archives and Records Administration
Juan Pablo Routzon Student Information Card
Date of Entry:

Student information card of Juan Pablo Routzon (here Rontzo), a member of the Pueblo Nation, who entered the school on October 7, 1914 and departed on August 29, 1918.

Nation:
Repository:
National Archives and Records Administration
Paul Juan Student File
Date of Entry:

Student file of Paul Juan, a member of the Pueblo Nation, who entered the school on October 7, 1914. No departure date is given. The file contains student information cards, an application for enrollment, outing evaluations, a certificate of promotion, financial transactions, correspondence, an outing record, medical/physical records, and a…

Repository:
National Archives and Records Administration
Paul Juan Student Information Card
Date of Entry:

Student information card of Paul Juan, a member of the Pueblo Nation, who entered the school on October 7, 1914 and departed on August 31, 1918. The file indicates Juan went to work at Hog Island, Pennsylvania upon the closure of the Carlisle Indian School.

Repository:
National Archives and Records Administration
Victor Naranjo Student File
Date of Entry:

Student file of Victor Naranjo, a member of the Pueblo Nation, who entered the school on November 15, 1917. No final departure date is given. The file contains student information cards, a financial transaction, an application for enrollment, a certificate of promotion, and correspondence. The file indicates that Naranjo went on outing with the…

Nation:
Repository:
National Archives and Records Administration
Victor Naranjo Student Information Card
Date of Entry:

Student information card of Victor Naranjo, a member of the Pueblo Nation, who entered the school on November 15, 1917 and departed on August 31, 1918. The file indicates Naranjo remained at Ford upon the closure of the Carlisle Indian School.

Nation:
Repository:
National Archives and Records Administration
Eadle Keatah Toh (Vol. 1, No. 5)
August 1880

Page one had a report on a bill that would “increase educational privileges and establish industrial schools for the benefit of youth belonging to such nomadic Indian tribes as have educational treaty claims upon the United States.” It also talked about the creation of the Carlisle Industrial Indian School as support of this bill. Page two had…

Format:
Newspapers
Repository:
Cumberland County Historical Society
Eadle Keatah Toh (Vol. 1, No. 10)
April 1881

Page one opened with a letter to Carlisle from “An Old Soldier” who had been stationed at the Carlisle Barracks forty years earlier. There were also three other letters to residents of the school from Peter Primaux, Paul C.T., and Arizona Jackson. The rest of the page was one to two sentence long excerpts from letters from students. Page two…

Nation:
Format:
Newspapers
Repository:
Cumberland County Historical Society
The School News (Vol. 1, No. 11)
April 1881

The opening article was written by Michael Burns (Apache), and focused on “The Indian Question.” In it he explains how many Indians falsely believe that white men are wiser simply because they are born white, and argues that their wisdom comes not from their skin color, but from more easily accessed education. The second page gives some…

Format:
Newspapers
Repository:
Cumberland County Historical Society
The School News (Vol. 1, No. 12)
May 1881

Number 12. Opened with a letter from Charles Kauboodle (Kiowa) to his cousin Laura, talking about what they’ve learned in school, their family, and wishing her a quick recovery from the sickness she has. Jessa Bent also had a few sentences on the desert published at the bottom of the page. The next page has a piece titled “Peace” about the hope…

Format:
Newspapers
Repository:
Cumberland County Historical Society
The School News (Vol. 2, No. 3)
August 1881

The August edition opens with an article on the need to be useful the Carlisle Children feel, and how badly the writer felt when unable to work while sick. It continued onto page four. Page two brings Samuel Townsend (Pawnee) stepping down as editor with Charles Kihega (Iowa) taking his place. There is also pieces on the possibility of moving…

Nation:
Format:
Newspapers
Repository:
Cumberland County Historical Society
The School News (Vol. 2, No. 4)
September 1881

The first page is has a small narrative from Nellie Carey (Apache) on her visit to the Navajoes with her white family, She describes the Navajoes as dirty, explaining how they don’t keep their tents clean. There was also a letter from Davis Cheyenne (Cheyenne) to Captain Pratt about his time in Old Bucks. Charles Kihega (Iowa) and Ellis B.…

Format:
Newspapers
Repository:
Cumberland County Historical Society
The School News (Vol. 2, No. 6)
November 1881

The first page talked about the cost of educating an Indian vs the cost of killing one to support the Indian Schools. The article was titled “The Amount it Takes to Kill One Indian Would Establish Many School Like Carlisle and Hampton” by Michael Burns (Apache). The second page has an article encouraging students to only speak English to learn…

Nation:
Format:
Newspapers
Repository:
Cumberland County Historical Society
The School News (Vol. 3, No. 1)
June 1882

On the first page Justine A. LaFromboise describes her trip to Carlisle, explaining how her father convinced her to go get an education. The story continues onto page four. On page two Ellis B. Childers (Creek) explained that he will be the editor while Charles Kihega (Iowa) visits home. C. Kihega examine the misconceptions between whites and…

Nation:
Format:
Newspapers
Repository:
Cumberland County Historical Society
The School News (Vol. 3, No. 3)
August 1882

On page one the paper’s editor, Charles Kihega (Iowa) wrote a letter about his successful journey home. Metopah (Osage), Taylor Ealy (Pueblo), and Frank Everett (Wichita) also wrote letters from home back to the school. On page two eight boys and twelve girls took a trip to explore Luray Cave. Also on the same page Van Horn (Cheyenne) and Thos…

Format:
Newspapers
Repository:
Cumberland County Historical Society
The School News (Vol. 3, No. 9)
February 1883

The first page had a story told to Joshua Given (Kiowa) by his grandparents about a young girl who never touched the ground and one day chased a star into the sky. It also included a letter from Louis Big Horse (Osage) to his father in which he discussed planting fruit. Page two had an article titled “What Indians Must Have” by paper editor…

Nation:
Format:
Newspapers
Topics:
Repository:
Cumberland County Historical Society
The Morning Star (Vol. 4, No. 5)
December 1883

Page one opened with an article titled “Strong Words for the Indians From Commissioner Price”, along with “A Plea for Civilized Indians”, “Two Pueblo Boys”, and “The Baby”. Page two had Captain Pratt’s account of his visit to the west. It also had comments from various chiefs on their opinion on Carlisle. Finishing up the page were comments on…

Format:
Newspapers
Topics:
Repository:
Cumberland County Historical Society
The Morning Star (Vol. 4, No. 7)
February 1884

Page one opened with Proverb 11:23. Also on he page was “Educating The Indians”, and a Pueblo legend as told by a Pueblo student. Page two had story about a foolish farmer, as well as an important letter from an Indian Agent, and a piece on a conference at Lake Mohonk. Page three had the School Items which included Sunday services and the…

Nation:
Format:
Newspapers
Repository:
Cumberland County Historical Society
The Morning Star (Vol. 5, No. 4)
October & November 1884

Page one had a poem titled “Lady Yeardley’s Guest” by Margaret Preston, followed by a report of the commissioner of Indian Affairs, which continued onto page two, and then onto page three, where it ended. After the finish of the report, page three had articles titled “The Up-Thrust of Civilization”, “Don’t Wait for the Others”, and “The Big…

Format:
Newspapers
Repository:
Dickinson College Archives & Special Collections
The Morning Star (Vol. 5, No. 6)
January 1885

Page one opened with an extract from Hon. Byron M. Cutcheon speech, “Our Indian Policy,” originally given to the House of Representatives. Following that was “Secretary Teller in Favor of Schools.” Page two had a list of Bills and Resolutions relating to Indians that went before congress recently. Also on Page two was a letter from a Carlisle…

Format:
Newspapers
Repository:
Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 1, No. 14)
November 13, 1885

The first page opened with a poem titled "Found in the Path," followed by an article called "Are You His Equal?" that described an incident in which the Man-on-the-Band-Stand corrected a Carlisle student's letter home because it contained disparaging language toward those with darker skin. There were a few more small news items on the page.…

Format:
Newspapers
Repository:
Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 2, No. 29)
February 25, 1887

The first page opened with a poem titled “New Every Morning,” followed by "An Indian Woman Fought For Her Husband After Receiving a Beating From Him" which concluded on the fourth page. Page two gave news from the Chemawa and Genoa Indian Schools, and "A Nice Pocket Book for the Best," asking for wish lists from the trade departments. Next came…

Format:
Newspapers
Topics:
Repository:
Dickinson College Archives & Special Collections
The Indian Helper (Vol. 2, No. 30)
March 4, 1887

The first page opened with a poem titled “So Say We, All of Us Girls,” followed by “The Indian’s Hair Would Not Curl,” by Aunt Martha that recalled a comical hair care story involving Aunt Martha’s friend and a visiting Indian chief. “From a Former Student of Carlisle” reprinted a letter to Capt. Pratt from former student Frank Aveline (Miami)…

Nation:
Format:
Newspapers
Repository:
Dickinson College Archives & Special Collections
The Indian Helper (Vol. 2, No. 32)
March 18, 1887

The first page opened with a poem titled “Take the Sunny Side,” by “Ex.” Also found on that page was “An Interesting Letter from John Dixon, One of Our Pueblo Boys Who Went to His Home in New Mexico Last Summer” addressed to Mr. Campbell. Dixon wrote about celebrating George Washington’s birthday, looking for railroad work and visiting the…

Nation:
Format:
Newspapers
Repository:
Dickinson College Archives & Special Collections