Student Deaths

Displaying 1 - 25 of 232 records
Eadle Keatah Toh (Vol. 1, No. 1)
January 1880

The first page opened with an article titled "THE INDIAN TRAINING SCHOOL," that described the progress of the school, its Christian methods, the work of the former Ft. Marion prisoners of war preparing buildings for use, the importance of the town Sunday Schools, the school curriculum that emphasized farmwork for boys and housekeeping for girls…

Format:
Newspapers
Repository:
National Archives and Records Administration
Eadle Keahtah Toh (Vol. 1, No. 2)
April 1880

Page one opened with a teacher identified as A.J.S. (Alfred J. Standing) reminiscing about his time teaching Native Americans before he came to Carlisle. Also on the page was an article signed by "G. Le R. B." (George Le Roy Brown) on the civilization of the Indians, comparing it to the conquests of the Roman Empire and its assimilation of less…

Format:
Newspapers
Repository:
Dickinson College Archives & Special Collections
Excerpt from Annual Report of the Commissioner of Indian Affairs, 1880
1880

An excerpt from the Annual Report of the Commissioner of Indian Affairs to the Secretary of Indian Affairs for the fiscal year ending 1880, containing the first annual report of the Carlisle Indian School. The report discusses the school's opening, recruitment of students, educational and industrial curricula, and overall health. Also included…

Format:
Book
Repository:
Dickinson College Archives & Special Collections
Eadle Keatah Toh (Vol. 1, No. 5)
August 1880

Page one had a report on a bill that would “increase educational privileges and establish industrial schools for the benefit of youth belonging to such nomadic Indian tribes as have educational treaty claims upon the United States.” It also talked about the creation of the Carlisle Industrial Indian School as support of this bill. Page two had…

Format:
Newspapers
Repository:
Cumberland County Historical Society
Eadle Keatah Toh (Vol. 1, No. 8)
December 1880

Page one started with an explanation for why boarding schools are necessary to successfully educate Indian children. It was explained that day school simply “do not withdraw the pupils from the influences of their home surroundings in such a manner us to facilitate a change in their habits of daily life.” Page two had a piece on the “Oklahoma…

Nation:
Format:
Newspapers
Repository:
Cumberland County Historical Society
The School News (Vol. 2, No. 3)
August 1881

The August edition opens with an article on the need to be useful the Carlisle Children feel, and how badly the writer felt when unable to work while sick. It continued onto page four. Page two brings Samuel Townsend (Pawnee) stepping down as editor with Charles Kihega (Iowa) taking his place. There is also pieces on the possibility of moving…

Nation:
Format:
Newspapers
Repository:
Cumberland County Historical Society
Eadle Keatah Toh (Vol. 2, No. 7)
February 1882

Page one had a letter to Capt. Richard H. Pratt on the methods followed in schools by Principal C. M. Semple. It also had an article titled “Indian Idiosyncrasies” about how Indians seem to have a better sense of direction than white people. Page two has the continuation of the previous article from page one, as well as “Wisconsin and it’s…

Nation:
Format:
Newspapers
Repository:
Cumberland County Historical Society
The School News (Vol. 3, No. 7)
December 1882

Page one featured Henry North's article about his outing during the summer in Lancaster County. North described his daily routine and explained what he learned. Page two had a piece about Christmas, in which all the students gathered in the chapel to meet with St. Nick. On the same page Calvin Red Wolf (Cheyenne) wrote to his father about his…

Format:
Newspapers
Repository:
Cumberland County Historical Society
The School News (Vol. 3, No. 11)
April 1883

The first page had a letter from an unnamed student to his Uncle explaining that the world is round and moves at 1041 miles per hour. Harry Raven (Arapahoe) also discussed in a speech how the Government will not always care for the Indians and differences between whites and Native Americans. On page two Charles Kihega (Iowa) questioned if the…

Nation:
Format:
Newspapers
Repository:
Cumberland County Historical Society
Excerpt from Annual Report of the Commissioner of Indian Affairs, 1883
1883

An excerpt from the Annual Report of the Commissioner of Indian Affairs to the Secretary of the Interior for the fiscal year ending 1883, containing the annual report of the Carlisle Indian School. The report provides a table of enrollment statistics, and has two addendums: one, a lengthy report by Principal C. M. Semple on the school's…

Format:
Book
Repository:
Dickinson College Archives & Special Collections
Excerpt from Annual Report of the Commissioner of Indian Affairs, 1884
1884

An excerpt from the Annual Report of the Commissioner of Indian Affairs to the Secretary of the Interior for the fiscal year ending 1884, containing the annual report of the Carlisle Indian School. The report includes discussions of enrollment statistics, transfers, educational and industrial progress, student health, the school farm, donations…

Format:
Book
Repository:
Dickinson College Archives & Special Collections
The Morning Star (Vol. 5, No. 6)
January 1885

Page one opened with an extract from Hon. Byron M. Cutcheon speech, “Our Indian Policy,” originally given to the House of Representatives. Following that was “Secretary Teller in Favor of Schools.” Page two had a list of Bills and Resolutions relating to Indians that went before congress recently. Also on Page two was a letter from a Carlisle…

Format:
Newspapers
Repository:
Cumberland County Historical Society
Excerpt from Annual Report of the Commissioner of Indian Affairs, 1885
1885

An excerpt from the Annual Report of the Commissioner of Indian Affairs to the Secretary of the Interior for the fiscal year ending 1885, containing the annual report of the Carlisle Indian Industrial School. The report includes a school population table as well as discussions of industry, academic work, dormitory expansions, and sanitary…

Format:
Book
Repository:
Dickinson College Archives & Special Collections
The Indian Helper (Vol. 1, No. 19)
December 18, 1885

The first page opened with a poem titled “For the Boys,” followed by a description of “Loafing” observed by the Man-on-the-band-stand among the boys on campus. There was also a feature, “200,000,000" that tallied up the time it would take to become as rich as Mr. Vanderbilt. Page two reported severe weather in Michigan, a request for a lost…

Format:
Newspapers
Repository:
Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 1, No. 27)
February 12, 1886

The first page opened with a poem titled "Content," followed by "He Suffered Because He Could Not Speak English," an article about a Kiowa boy who was accused of a crime and could not defend himself. The next article was a treatise on the importance of buying insurance. Page two began with a memorial about General Hancock titled "The Dead Hero…

Format:
Newspapers
Repository:
Cumberland County Historical Society
Excerpt from Annual Report of the Commissioner of Indian Affairs, 1886
1886

An excerpt from the Annual Report of the Commissioner of Indian Affairs to the Secretary of the Interior for the fiscal year ending 1886, containing the Seventh Annual Report of the Carlisle Indian Industrial School. The report, submitted by Superintendent Richard Henry Pratt, includes a school population table as well as discussions of…

Format:
Book
Repository:
Dickinson College Archives & Special Collections
The Indian Helper (Vol. 2, No. 42)
May 27, 1887

The first page opened with the poem "Take Care" followed by "A Visitor at Carlisle" which provided the opportunity to present arguments for Indian education away from the reservations. It continued on page four. Page two opened with an account of a presentation by "Dr. Harmon and Col. Thomas," a Dickinson College professor and his former…

Format:
Newspapers
Repository:
Cumberland County Historical Society
Excerpt from Annual Report of the Commissioner of Indian Affairs, 1887
1887

An excerpt from the Annual Report of the Commissioner of Indian Affairs to the Secretary of the Interior for the fiscal year ending 1887, containing the Eighth Annual Report of the Carlisle Indian Industrial School. The report, submitted by Superintendent Richard Henry Pratt, includes a school population table as well as discussions of industry…

Format:
Book
Repository:
Dickinson College Archives & Special Collections
The Indian Helper (Vol. 2, No. 47)
July 1, 1887

This issue opened with a poem titled “CLASS OF INDIAN BOYS,” written by a Quaker farm wife about a group of Outing students. The next article was titled “A TRIP” by Katie Grinrod (Wyandotte), which gave the account of her and Clara Cornelius’(Oneida) trip to Philadelphia with their Outing family. Page two opened with “A Better Chance” that…

Format:
Newspapers
Repository:
Dickinson College Archives & Special Collections
The Indian Helper (Vol. 3, No. 4)
September 2, 1887

The first page opened with a temperance poem and a reprint of a letter received from Minnie Yellowbear, who returned to Indian Territory and was teaching at the Arapaho school. Page two reported the practice of government and missionary teachers using native language curricula along with English language curricula, and urged Carlisle students…

Nation:
Format:
Newspapers
Repository:
Dickinson College Archives & Special Collections
The Indian Helper (Vol. 3, No. 10)
October 14, 1887

The first page began with the poem, "Sermon in Rhyme," followed by Carlos Montezuma's "An Apache" in which he wrote from the Chicago Medical College telling his story of being kidnapped and raised in the white world. His account continued on page four. Page two included the account of the death of student Bruce Hayman (Pawnee) who died visiting…

Format:
Newspapers
Repository:
Dickinson College Archives & Special Collections
The Indian Helper (Vol. 3, No. 22)
January 13, 1888

The first page opened with a poem, "How To Be Happy" followed by a reprint of a letter to the school from J. H. Seger of the Cheyenne and Arapahoe Agency dated Jan 4, 1888 that mentioned several students who returned to the Agency. Page two gave a humorous offering by Nellie Carey (Apache) from "her new place in the country," advice for the…

Format:
Newspapers
Repository:
Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 3, No. 27)
February 17, 1888

The first page opened with a poem, " A Short Sermon," followed by a letter to the Man-on-the-Band-Stand dated Feb 7, 1888 from M. Burgess, entitled "A Sleeping Car," about the comforts of traveling in a sleeping car, which continued on page four.  Page two featured a report called "The Full Exhibit Of The Carlisle Indian School, For Senator…

Format:
Newspapers
Repository:
Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 3, No. 32)
March 23, 1888

The first page opened with a poem, "Little Moments," followed by "A Letter," dated March 21, 1888 describing some of the Man-On-the-Band-Stand's observations. The next feature was an article about how to build a periscope. It was titled "Seeing Through a Brick," and continued on the fourth page. Page two included a detailed description of the…

Format:
Newspapers
Repository:
Cumberland County Historical Society
Excerpt from Annual Report of the Commissioner of Indian Affairs, 1888
1888

An excerpt from the Annual Report of the Commissioner of Indian Affairs to the Secretary of the Interior for the fiscal year ending 1888, containing the Ninth Annual Report of the Carlisle Indian Industrial School. The report, submitted by Superintendent Richard Henry Pratt, includes a school population table as well as discussions of industry…

Format:
Book
Repository:
Dickinson College Archives & Special Collections