Townsend, Samuel

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Samuel Townsend Student File
Date of Entry:

Student file of Samuel Townsend, a member of the Pawnee Nation, who entered the school on October 27, 1879 and ultimately departed on September 30, 1892. The file includes a report after leaving indicating that in 1910 Townsend was a printer living in Kansas City, Missouri. 

In school documentation Samuel Townsend is also known as Sam…

Nation:
Repository:
National Archives and Records Administration
Samuel Townsend Student Information Cards
Date of Entry:

Student information cards of Samuel Townsend, a member of the Pawnee Nation, who entered the school on October 27, 1879 and ultimately departed on September 30, 1892.

Repository:
National Archives and Records Administration
School News (Vol. 1, No. 1)
June 1880

The first article by M. D. P. [Mason D. Pratt] describes a field trip to an iron forge near Pine Grove, followed by a picnic at the grove with the students, teachers, visiting chiefs, the college band and some invited guests. “An Indian Boy's Camp Life,” by Henry C. Roman Nose, gives a short account of his activities growing up. An "Editorial"…

Format:
Newspapers
Repository:
Cumberland County Historical Society
School News (Vol. 1, No. 2)
July 1880

The first article is by John Downing (Cherokee), titles “Learning How to Use Bad Things.” In which he writes about alcohol and the benefits of being nice to the people of the United States, and a letter from Moses Nonway to his mother asking on the health of his people and reflecting on their poverty. The next page contained a list of small…

Format:
Newspapers
Repository:
Cumberland County Historical Society
School News (Vol. 1, No. 3)
August 1880

An excursion to Warm Spring opened this edition, titled “The Camp at the Warm Springs” by John Downing (Cherokee). They hiked all day until they reached the Springs, picking black berries along the way and at one point believing they had gotten lost. This proceeded an editorial on the benefits of sending Indian children to school, which was…

Format:
Newspapers
Repository:
Cumberland County Historical Society
School News (Vol. 1, No. 7)
December 1880

Issue Seven opens with Roman Nose explaining how he came to Carlisle after being held captive in St. Augustine for three years. He explains his time there was good because of the kindness of Capt. Pratt. After the editorial about the benefits of speaking English, there was a small letter from a Sioux boy named Phillip, to show how “large boys…

Format:
Newspapers
Repository:
Cumberland County Historical Society
The School News (Vol. 1, No. 11)
April 1881

The opening article was written by Michael Burns (Apache), and focused on “The Indian Question.” In it he explains how many Indians falsely believe that white men are wiser simply because they are born white, and argues that their wisdom comes not from their skin color, but from more easily accessed education. The second page gives some…

Format:
Newspapers
Repository:
Cumberland County Historical Society
The School News (Vol. 2, No. 1)
June 1881

Page one opens with a letter from Lucius Aitson (Kiowa) to his father describing an illness he had that left him bed ridden for two weeks and how fond her is of English. Also on this page is a short bit from Nellie Robertson (Sioux) about the story of Moses. The next page had an article titled “A Little History of the Pawnee” by paper editor…

Nation:
Format:
Newspapers
Repository:
Cumberland County Historical Society
The School News (Vol. 2, No. 2)
July 1881

The entire first page is a letter from Virginia Oequa (Kiowa) to her teacher Miss H, sent after she left Carlisle to work on a farm for a few weeks. She sent her love and explained the pride she took in her work. Page two had two articles on the shooting of President James Garfield, written by Samuel Townsend (Pawnee) and Robert W. Stewart (…

Format:
Newspapers
Topics:
Repository:
Cumberland County Historical Society
The School News (Vol. 2, No. 3)
August 1881

The August edition opens with an article on the need to be useful the Carlisle Children feel, and how badly the writer felt when unable to work while sick. It continued onto page four. Page two brings Samuel Townsend (Pawnee) stepping down as editor with Charles Kihega (Iowa) taking his place. There is also pieces on the possibility of moving…

Nation:
Format:
Newspapers
Repository:
Cumberland County Historical Society
The Morning Star (Vol. 4, No. 3)
October 1883

Page One had extracts from an address of Hon. B.G. Northrop Ex. Sec. State Board of Education of Connecticut. Page two had “Items of Interest From the Late Sioux Commission”, as well as a short piece on “What our Pupils in the Country Say.” Page three had short vignettes on various Local Items including returned students, weather and crops.…

Nation:
Format:
Newspapers
Repository:
Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 3, No. 32)
March 23, 1888

The first page opened with a poem, "Little Moments," followed by "A Letter," dated March 21, 1888 describing some of the Man-On-the-Band-Stand's observations. The next feature was an article about how to build a periscope. It was titled "Seeing Through a Brick," and continued on the fourth page. Page two included a detailed description of the…

Format:
Newspapers
Repository:
Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 4, No. 14)
November 16, 1888

The first page opened with a poem, “Be Careful What You Say,” followed by “Indian Names,” on the origin of Indian names. Next came an article titled “Wanted, Something Inside,” about the value of persistence and perseverance, followed by small blurbs about the Christian population of Japan and the construction of a rabbit-proof fence in…

Format:
Newspapers
Repository:
Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 4, No. 17)
December 7, 1888

This issue opened with a poem titled “HOW," by John Boyle O'Reilly, followed by news from a letter from Carlisle alumnus Samuel Townsend (Pawnee), a student at Marietta College. Page two included news items about Congress convening, Nancy Cornelius (Oneida) attending the Woman's National Indian Association, new arrivals, "Thanksgiving Echoes…

Nation:
Format:
Newspapers
Repository:
Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 4, No. 28)
March 1, 1889

The first page began with a poem titled, “This Life is What We Make It,” followed by a letter from Samuel Townsend (Pawnee) about school life at Marietta College. The second page included news from letters from former students and an excerpted speech from Thomas Metoxen (Oneida).

Among the brief items on page three was a report that baby…

Format:
Newspapers
Repository:
Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 4, No. 36)
April 26, 1889

The first page opened with a poem "The Printer-Boy Tramp” by Will Carleton, followed by “Encouraging Prospects” about Luther Kuhns at the Pawnee Agency. Next came “A Man Who was not Afraid to Work” on how General Washington set an example for his corporal. Also on the page was an article titled “Easter Eggs in Washington.” Page two contained a…

Nation:
Format:
Newspapers
Repository:
Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 4, No. 44)
June 21, 1889

The first page opened with a poem by Fannie Bolton titled “It is Time,” followed by “The Experience of a Bull: A Child’s Version of the Recent Flood at Lewistown,” followed by “A Busy Indian Boy in the Country” which was Wallace Scott’s (Pueblo) description of his farm experience in Bucks County. Page two featured a notice of the new premium…

Format:
Newspapers
Repository:
Dickinson College Archives & Special Collections
The Indian Helper (Vol. 5, No. 5)
September 20, 1889

The first page opened with a poem "The Singer’s Alms: An Incident in the Life of the Great Tenor, Mario” by Henry Abbey, followed by the first installment in a series of articles written by the Man-on-the-Band-Stand about a Pueblo girl named Mollie. These stories were later published in book form in Stiya by Marianna Burgess, who used…

Format:
Newspapers
Repository:
Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 5, No. 8)
October 11, 1889

The first page opened with a poem by Bayard Taylor with the first line "Learn to live, and live to learn” followed by the fourth installment of the series titled “How An Indian Girl Might Tell Her Own Story if She Had the Chance: All Founded on Actual Observations of the Man-on-the-band-stand’s Chief Clerk” (continued from the previous week).…

Nation:
Format:
Newspapers
Repository:
Cumberland County Historical Society
Our Boys and Girls, 1881

The printed note on the reverse side reads: OUR BOYS AND GIRLS At the Indian Training School, Carlisle, Pa.

1. White Buffalo, Cheyenne, I. T.
2. Mittie Houston, Wichita, I. T.
3. Samuel Townsend, Pawnee, I. T.
4. Nancy Renville, Sisseston Sioux, D…

Format:
Photographic Print, B&W
Repository:
Dickinson College Archives & Special Collections
Cyrus Windy, Samuel Townsend, and Luke Phillips, c.1882

Studio portrait of Cyrus Windy (standing), Samuel Townsend (seated at left), and Luke Phillips (seated at right), all wearing school uniforms.

Format:
Glass Plate Negative
Repository:
National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Mason Pratt, Charles Kihega, Samuel Townsend, and Benjamin Marshall [version 1], c.1882

Studio portrait of Mason Pratt (seated at left), Charles Kihega (standing), Samuel Townsend (seated at right), and Benjamin Marshall (seated at right). The three students are wearing school uniforms. Mason Pratt was the son of Richard Henry Pratt. 

Note: Previous cataloging indicates the handwritten caption includes that these are…

Format:
Glass Plate Negative
Repository:
National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Mason Pratt, Charles Kihega, Samuel Townsend, and Benjamin Marshall [version 2], c.1882

Studio portrait of Mason Pratt (seated at left), Charles Kihega (standing), Samuel Townsend (seated at right), and Benjamin Marshall (seated in center). The three students are wearing school uniforms. 

Note: Mason Pratt was the son of Richard Henry Pratt.

Nation:
Format:
Photographic Print, B&W
Repository:
Cumberland County Historical Society
Samuel Townsend, c.1884

Studio portrait of Samuel Townsend.

Format:
Glass Plate Negative
Repository:
National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Samuel Townsend, c.1885

Studio portrait of Samuel Townsend wearing school uniform.

The caption reads: Samuel Townsend

Nation:
Format:
Glass Plate Negative
Repository:
Dickinson College Archives & Special Collections