Pratt, Richard Henry

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The Indian Helper (Vol. 1, No. 10)
October 16, 1885

The first page opened with an article titled "Hell Gate!” that described the explosive removal of the giant rocks from the river that connected Manhattan Island to Long Island Sound in New York. Page two featured small national headlines, local school news items, an article about “Money,” and a...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 1, No. 16)
November 27, 1885

The first page opened with a poem titled “Snow Brings Fun,” followed by instructions for “How to Write to Your Mother,” directed to a young man with instructions for how to reply to his mother who was pleading for his return back to his home agency. Page two opened with a series of news items...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 1, No. 30)
March 5, 1886

The first page opened with a poem titled "Exhibition Night: By The-Man-on-the-Band-Stand's Wife." There were also several brief articles about high winds in Philadelphia, heavy snows in Quebec, the fate of a ship that ran aground during a voyage between Boston and Liverpool, a birthday party for...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 1, No. 35)
April 9, 1886

The first page opened with a poem titled "Spring,” followed by "How a Pawnee Got Ahead of a Cheyenne Chief: A Story as told by one of our Boys," in which a U.S. congressman’s position was chastised using an analogy of a Cheyenne-Pawnee skirmish. There is also a blurb about temperance on this...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 2, No. 18)
December 10, 1886

The first page opened with a poem titled "Much Depends on Your Aiming," about keeping to the straight path, followed by "A Boy Froze to Death While On Duty," about the effects of an ice storm on Lake Michigan followed by "Moved Again," in which the Man-on-the-band-stand opined that Indians who...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
January 20, 1888

The first page opened with a poem, "Big Fraid and Little Fraid" followed by an article, "Another Pleasant Evening in the Chapel," that detailed the entertainment featuring numerous students reciting or singing poems, songs and reports. It continued on page four, which is missing from the...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 3, No. 33)
March 30, 1888

The first page opened with the poem, " A Proverb," followed by Jemima Wheelock's (Oneida) report of "Our Wilmington Trip," about a group of students traveling to Delaware where they stayed with families before they headed to Philadelphia with Capt. Pratt and Miss Leverett.  They visited John...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 3, No. 51)
August 3, 1888

The first page opened with an untitled selection, opening with the line, “A Man of kindness to his beast is kind,” followed by “A Day In London,” dated July 12, 1888, signed by “A Carlisler,” who is later revealed to be Miss Lowe, and continued on to the fourth page.  The report included a visit...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 3, No. 52)
August 10, 1888

The first page opened with the poem, “What Makes A Man,” followed by an article titled, “Interesting Observations At the Indians’ Own Home” reprinting a letter from Joshua Given (Kiowa) who described the social and political news from the Kiowa and Comanche Agency. He reported the activities of...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 4, No. 1)
August 17, 1888

The first page opened with the poem, “What the Flowers Said,” followed by an article reprinted from The Baltimorean, titled "Men Who Were Laughed At,” about how technologies were first spurned. Page two featured several news reports about the band, outing experiences, news from the...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 4, No. 12)
November 2, 1888

The first page opened with the poem, “Little Helpers,” reprinted from the Sunday School Times. Next came a piece titled “Environment,” the answer to the previously posted word story, followed by “No Time to Read?” about the importance of reading which continued on the fourth page. Page...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 4, No. 13)
November 9,1888

The first page opened with an untitled poem that bore the first line, “No human life ere dawned on earth.” Then came an article titled “Judge Wright’s Talk,” that excerpted J.V. Wright’s discourse on the importance of the Indian students’ perseverance and the success of the Coeur d’Alene and...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 4, No. 14)
November 16, 1888

The first page opened with a poem, “Be Careful What You Say,” followed by “Indian Names,” on the origin of Indian names. Next came an article titled “Wanted, Something Inside,” about the value of persistence and perseverance, followed by small blurbs about the Christian population of Japan and...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 4, No. 22)
January 18, 1889

The first page opened with a poem titled “Do We All?” followed by an article, “Do You Want to Get Rich?” about the value of saving little things. The next article, “Dr. Jackson at Our Missionary Meeting,” described the work of Sheldon Jackson among the Metlakahtla boys at the Sitka Industrial...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 4, No. 4)
September 7, 1888

The first page opened with a poem, “Grasp the Nettle,” followed by a reprinted letter to Superintendent Pratt from Conrad Roubideaux (Sioux) titled “Conrad Didn’t Give Up the Ship,” in which he described the hardships of finding work on the reservation. Page two included news that Pratt was out...

Repository: Private Collection
The Indian Helper (Vol. 4, No. 6)
September 21, 1888

The first page opened with an untitled poem by J. W. Burgess reprinted from Sunshine, followed by “Our Walnut Tree” about the Man-On-the-Band-Stand’s efforts to keep students from picking green walnuts. The second page began with “The Captain,” which described the speech Capt. Pratt...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 4, No. 9)
October 12, 1888

The first page opened with an untitled poem, with the first line “God Wants the Boys,” followed by anonymous advice “Be Inventive.” Next came two columns, “Girls Read This,” an exercise for good posture and “Boys Read This,” an exercise for good behavior. The news items on page two gave reports...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 5, No. 20)
January 17, 1890

The first page opened with a poem titled "Hoe Out Your Row," followed by "A Worthy Example," that touted a fictional conversation between two boys musing on the accomplishments of Indian Commissioner T. J. Morgan. Page two included several articles and notices about country life for Outing...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 5, No. 8)
October 11, 1889

The first page opened with a poem by Bayard Taylor with the first line "Learn to live, and live to learn” followed by the fourth installment of the series titled “How An Indian Girl Might Tell Her Own Story if She Had the Chance: All Founded on Actual Observations of the Man-on-the-band-stand’s...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Morning Star (Vol. 3, No. 12)
July 1883

Page one is dominated by small vignettes of various day-to-day events that happened at the school, including compliments on students works, stories of gifted flowers and visiting agents. Page two has the beginning of an article titled “A Visit to the Indian Territory – Our Returned Pupils” which...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Red Man (Vol. 13, No. 8)
March 1896

This issue commemorates the Eighth Graduating Exercises and Seventh Anniversary Exercises. The first page contained a list of distinguished guests in attendance.  Graduation speeches from students are presented in the paper, as are transcribed accounts of the exercises. The list included...

Repository: Dickinson College Archives & Special Collections
Twelve Navajo students (pose 1), 1882

Portrait of Richard Henry Pratt (seated on the bandstand) with one female Navajo student and eleven male students. The female student, Antoinette Williams, had arrived on December 5, 1881. She and Pratt are posed with a group of male Navajo students who had arrived on the day this photograph was...

Format: Photographic Print, B&W
Repository: Dickinson College Archives & Special Collections
Twelve Navajo students (pose 2) [version 1], 1882

Portrait of eleven male students and one female student posed in front of the bandstand on the school grounds. Richard Henry Pratt is sitting on the bandstand, behind the group.

The female student, Antoinette Williams, had arrived on December 5, 1881. The male students are a group of male...

Format: Glass Plate Negative
Repository: National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Twelve Navajo students (pose 2) [version 2], 1882

Portrait of eleven male students and one female students posed in front of the bandstand on the school grounds. Richard Henry Pratt is sitting on the bandstand, behind the group. They are a group of Navajo students who arrived on October 21, 1882.

They are, front row, seated, left to...

Format: Photographic Print, B&W
Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
Vincent Natalish (Nah-tail-eh) Student File

Student file of Vincent Natalish (Nah-tail-eh), a member of the Apache Nation, who entered the school on April 30, 1887, graduated in 1899,and departed on March 11, 1899. The file contains a trade/position record, newspaper clippings, a former student response postcard, a student information...

Repository: National Archives and Records Administration

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