Pratt, Richard Henry

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Richard Henry Pratt with three young students, c.1881

Studio portrait of Richard Henry Pratt with two unidentified female students and one unidentified male student. 

Format: Glass Plate Negative
Repository: National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Richard Henry Pratt [version 1], 1899

Studio portrait of Richard Henry Pratt in military uniform with sword, holding a helmet. 

This image appears in John N. Choate's...

Format: Glass Plate Negative
Repository: National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Richard Henry Pratt [version 2], 1899

Studio portrait of Richard Henry Pratt in military uniform with sword, holding a helmet. 

This image appears in John N. Choate's...

Format: Photographic Print, B&W
Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
Richard Henry Pratt, 1890

The handwritten note reads: Capt Pratt. Supt of Indian School Carlisle Pa.

Format: Photographic Print, B&W
Repository: Dickinson College Archives & Special Collections
Richard Henry Pratt, His Family, and Teachers, 1901

Richard Henry Pratt, his wife and children, teachers and probably school staff, posed on the steps of a school building. Two male students are standing on the porch of the building, presumably not supposed to be part of the photograph. 

In 1901 the Bureau of Indian Affairs contracted with...

Format: Photographic Print, B&W
Repository: Library of Congress, Prints & Photographs Division
Seven Chiricahua students upon arrival, 1886

Portrait of three male students and four female students photographed in the clothing they arrived in. Standing behind them are Richard Henry Pratt (second from the left), two uniformed soldiers, and one male student in uniform with a scarf (right). They are posed on the school grounds.

...

Format: Photographic Print, B&W
Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
Six Sioux chiefs with five other men [version 1], 1880

Portrait of six Sioux chiefs posed with four other men on the steps of the bandstand on the school grounds. The man at the far left leaning on the railing is probably Richard Henry Pratt. The chiefs are Red Shirt, Thunder Hawk, Big Head (or Big Headed), John Grass, Two Bear (or Two Bears), and...

Format: Glass Plate Negative
Repository: National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Six Sioux chiefs with five other men [version 2], 1880

Portrait of six Sioux chiefs posed with four other men on the steps of the bandstand on the school grounds. The man at the far left leaning on the railing is probably Richard Henry Pratt. The chiefs are Red Shirt, Thunder Hawk, Big Head (or Big Headed), John Grass, Two Bear (or Two Bears), and...

Format: Photographic Print, B&W
Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
Souvenir of the Carlisle Indian School, 1902
1902

A souvenir booklet from the Carlisle Indian School, published for their 23rd year.  A short description of the aims and goals of the school is presented.  Images of students as they first arrived, as well as important visiting chiefs, are given, as are before and after images including those of...

Repository: Dickinson College Archives & Special Collections
T.J. Morgan, Commissioner of Indian Affairs, with Richard Henry Pratt and teachers [pose 1], c.1890

Portrait of T.J. Morgan, the Commissioner of Indian Affairs, posed with Richard Henry Pratt and the school's teachers on the school grounds. 

The school newspapers reported a visited by Morgan to the school in February of 1890. It's possible that this photograph was taken at that time...

Format: Photographic Print, B&W
Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
T.J. Morgan, Commissioner of Indian Affairs, with Richard Henry Pratt and teachers [pose 2], c.1890

Portrait of T.J. Morgan, the Commissioner of Indian Affairs, posed with Richard Henry Pratt and the school's teachers on the school grounds. 

The school newspapers reported a visited by Morgan to the school in February of 1890. It's possible that this photograph was taken at that time...

Format: Glass Plate Negative
Repository: National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
The American Indian Magazine (Vol. 6, No. 4)
Winter 1919

A description of this magazine is not currently available.

Repository: Dickinson College Archives & Special Collections
The Indian Helper (Vol. 1, No. 10)
October 16, 1885

The first page opened with an article titled "Hell Gate!” that described the explosive removal of the giant rocks from the river that connected Manhattan Island to Long Island Sound in New York. Page two featured small national headlines, local school news items, an article about “Money,” and a...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 1, No. 16)
November 27, 1885

The first page opened with a poem titled “Snow Brings Fun,” followed by instructions for “How to Write to Your Mother,” directed to a young man with instructions for how to reply to his mother who was pleading for his return back to his home agency. Page two opened with a series of news items...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 1, No. 30)
March 5, 1886

The first page opened with a poem titled "Exhibition Night: By The-Man-on-the-Band-Stand's Wife." There were also several brief articles about high winds in Philadelphia, heavy snows in Quebec, the fate of a ship that ran aground during a voyage between Boston and Liverpool, a birthday party for...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 1, No. 35)
April 9, 1886

The first page opened with a poem titled "Spring,” followed by "How a Pawnee Got Ahead of a Cheyenne Chief: A Story as told by one of our Boys," in which a U.S. congressman’s position was chastised using an analogy of a Cheyenne-Pawnee skirmish. There is also a blurb about temperance on this...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 2, No. 18)
December 10, 1886

The first page opened with a poem titled "Much Depends on Your Aiming," about keeping to the straight path, followed by "A Boy Froze to Death While On Duty," about the effects of an ice storm on Lake Michigan followed by "Moved Again," in which the Man-on-the-band-stand opined that Indians who...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
January 20, 1888

The first page opened with a poem, "Big Fraid and Little Fraid" followed by an article, "Another Pleasant Evening in the Chapel," that detailed the entertainment featuring numerous students reciting or singing poems, songs and reports. It continued on page four, which is missing from the...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 3, No. 33)
March 30, 1888

The first page opened with the poem, " A Proverb," followed by Jemima Wheelock's (Oneida) report of "Our Wilmington Trip," about a group of students traveling to Delaware where they stayed with families before they headed to Philadelphia with Capt. Pratt and Miss Leverett.  They visited John...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 3, No. 51)
August 3, 1888

The first page opened with an untitled selection, opening with the line, “A Man of kindness to his beast is kind,” followed by “A Day In London,” dated July 12, 1888, signed by “A Carlisler,” who is later revealed to be Miss Lowe, and continued on to the fourth page.  The report included a visit...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 3, No. 52)
August 10, 1888

The first page opened with the poem, “What Makes A Man,” followed by an article titled, “Interesting Observations At the Indians’ Own Home” reprinting a letter from Joshua Given (Kiowa) who described the social and political news from the Kiowa and Comanche Agency. He reported the activities of...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 4, No. 1)
August 17, 1888

The first page opened with the poem, “What the Flowers Said,” followed by an article reprinted from The Baltimorean, titled "Men Who Were Laughed At,” about how technologies were first spurned. Page two featured several news reports about the band, outing experiences, news from the...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 4, No. 13)
November 9, 1888

The first page opened with an untitled poem that bore the first line, “No human life ere dawned on earth.” Then came an article titled “Judge Wright’s Talk,” that excerpted J.V. Wright’s discourse on the importance of the Indian students’ perseverance and the success of the Coeur d’Alene and...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 4, No. 14)
November 16, 1888

The first page opened with a poem, “Be Careful What You Say,” followed by “Indian Names,” on the origin of Indian names. Next came an article titled “Wanted, Something Inside,” about the value of persistence and perseverance, followed by small blurbs about the Christian population of Japan and...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 4, No. 22)
January 18, 1889

The first page opened with a poem titled “Do We All?” followed by an article, “Do You Want to Get Rich?” about the value of saving little things. The next article, “Dr. Jackson at Our Missionary Meeting,” described the work of Sheldon Jackson among the Metlakahtla boys at the Sitka Industrial...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society

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