Kiowa

Displaying 126 - 150 of 242 records
The Indian Helper (Vol. 2, No. 37)
April 22, 1887

This issue opened with a poem titled “Kindness” followed by a reprint from the Word Carrier, “Manners” that compared ill-mannered behavior to animal traits and was intended as a lesson to Carlisle students. Also on that page was a paragraph reprinted from the Genoa Indian School describing a farming contest challenge between the Genoa…

Nation:
Format:
Newspapers
Topics:
Repository:
Dickinson College Archives & Special Collections
The Indian Helper (Vol. 2, No. 39)
May 6, 1887

The Indian Helper opened with a poem titled “A New Citizen,” written by Elsie Fuller (Omaha) who was a student at Hampton Institute, reprinted from “Talks and Thoughts.” The next article was an explanation of the Dawes Act written by Sen. Henry Dawes and titled “THE LAND IN SEVERALTY BILL MADE EASY TO UNDERSTAND.” Page two was taken up…

Nation:
Format:
Newspapers
Repository:
Dickinson College Archives & Special Collections
The Indian Helper (Vol. 2, No. 45)
June 17, 1887

This issue opened with a poem titled “A CLUSTER OF NEVERS,” from Selected, followed by a fictionalized conversation between two boys traveling to their homes in the west from Carlisle titled “TWO BOYS TALK IN THE CARS ON THEIR WAY HOME: WHAT THEY MAY HAVE SAID.” In the conversation, “Ira” and “Bart” muse about their appreciation of…

Format:
Newspapers
Repository:
Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 2, No. 46)
June 24, 1887

The first page opened with the poem "What a Jug Did," reprinted from An Old Scrap Book followed by a piece called "Nice Letter from Mr. Standing," made up of abstracts from his trip West returning Carlisle students to their home agencies. Standing mentioned there was a special travel car for girls and sick students, and described his…

Format:
Newspapers
Repository:
Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 2, No. 47)
July 1, 1887

This issue opened with a poem titled “CLASS OF INDIAN BOYS,” written by a Quaker farm wife about a group of Outing students. The next article was titled “A TRIP” by Katie Grinrod (Wyandotte), which gave the account of her and Clara Cornelius’(Oneida) trip to Philadelphia with their Outing family. Page two opened with “A Better Chance” that…

Format:
Newspapers
Repository:
Dickinson College Archives & Special Collections
The Indian Helper (Vol. 3, No. 42)
June 1, 1888

The first page opened with a poem, "The Old Steam Mill," followed by a fictitious conversation between two Carlisle Indian School students, Tom and Ben discussing the merits of work and study. It continued on page four. Page two included news from Pine Ridge Agency, and of the Standing family’s trip to Liverpool, the value of repeating unknown…

Nation:
Format:
Newspapers
Repository:
Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 3, No. 52)
August 10, 1888

The first page opened with the poem, “What Makes A Man,” followed by an article titled, “Interesting Observations At the Indians’ Own Home” reprinting a letter from Joshua Given (Kiowa) who described the social and political news from the Kiowa and Comanche Agency. He reported the activities of students who had returned home from Carlisle. The…

Nation:
Format:
Newspapers
Repository:
Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 4, No. 19)
December 21, 1888

The first page opened with a poem titled “GOD'S CHRISTMAS GIFTS," by Dwight Weldon. Also on the page were numerous Christmas articles, including a piece about the spirit of giving called "A MERRY CHRISTMAS! A HAPPY NEW YEAR!" and a reprint from Sunshine about the meaning of A.D. 1888. Page two opened with a few maxims; news from former…

Nation:
Format:
Newspapers
Topics:
Repository:
Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 4, No. 45)
June 28, 1889

The first page opened with a poem by titled “When a Girl Knows How” to sew, bake and knit followed by “You Home-Going Boys and Girls: Will you be in the New or the Old of the Moon?” which asked J.H. Segar what the Cheyenne and Arapho boys and girls were doing at their agency in Cantonment, Oklahoma. Page two continued the news from Cantonment…

Format:
Newspapers
Repository:
Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 5, No. 8)
October 11, 1889

The first page opened with a poem by Bayard Taylor with the first line "Learn to live, and live to learn” followed by the fourth installment of the series titled “How An Indian Girl Might Tell Her Own Story if She Had the Chance: All Founded on Actual Observations of the Man-on-the-band-stand’s Chief Clerk” (continued from the previous week).…

Nation:
Format:
Newspapers
Repository:
Cumberland County Historical Society
Souvenir of the Carlisle Indian School, 1902
1902

A souvenir booklet from the Carlisle Indian School, published for their 23rd year.  A short description of the aims and goals of the school is presented.  Images of students as they first arrived, as well as important visiting chiefs, are given, as are before and after images including those of Tom Torlino.  Extracurricular groups, school staff…

Format:
Pamphlet
Repository:
Dickinson College Archives & Special Collections
Seven Kiowa students, c.1879

Group portrait of four male students and three female students posed in front of a school building. They have been identified as Etadleuh Doanmoe, Laura Doanmoe, Joshua Given, Charles (Left Hand), Mabel (Little), Fanny (Knife Holder), and Lucius Aitsan (Cute).  Etadleuh Doanmoe is wearing a school uniform.

Nation:
Format:
Glass Plate Negative, Stereograph
Repository:
Cumberland County Historical Society
Former Fort Marion prisoners at the Carlisle Indian School, c.1879

Portrait of White Bear, Zonkeuh, Koba, Henry Roman Nose, Little Chief, Charles Oheltoint, Etadleuh Doanmoe, and White Man posed on the grounds of the school. 

Note: The Cumberland County Historical Society notes the identification of these people is based on a copy of the image posted for sale on eBay. That copy was identitied as "No. 27…

Format:
Glass Plate Negative, Stereograph
Repository:
Cumberland County Historical Society
Big Bow [version 1], c.1880

Studio portrait of Big Bow, a Kiowa chief.

Nation:
Format:
Glass Plate Negative
Repository:
National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Big Bow [version 2], c.1880

Studio portrait of Big Bow, a Kiowa chief.

Nation:
Format:
Photographic Print, B&W
Repository:
Cumberland County Historical Society
Charles Kawboodle, c.1880

Studio portrait of Charles Kawboodle.

Nation:
Format:
Glass Plate Negative
Repository:
National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Etadleuh Doanmoe, c.1880

Studio portrait of Etadleuh Doanmoe.

The caption reads: Etahdleuh

Nation:
Format:
Glass Plate Negative
Repository:
Dickinson College Archives & Special Collections
Fanny and Dora, c.1880

Studio portrait of Fanny and Dora both wearing school uniforms.

Format:
Glass Plate Negative
Repository:
National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Five female students [version 1], 1880

Studio portrait of Alice Wynn (back left), Kisetta Roosevelt (back middle), Mabel Doanmoe (back right), Rebecca Big Star (front left), and Harriet Mary Elder (front right). All are wearing school uniforms.

Format:
Glass Plate Negative
Repository:
National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Laura Doanmoe, c.1880

Studio portrait of Laura Doanmoe wearing school uniform. Handwritten caption along the side of the image reads: Laura Doanmoe

Nation:
Format:
Glass Plate Negative
Repository:
National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Male students posed in the tin shop with Richard Henry Pratt and instructor, c.1880

A posed group of male students in the Carlisle Indian School tin shop with their instructor and Richard Henry Pratt. They are, from left to right: Charles Oheltoint, Richard Henry Pratt, Henry Roman Nose, Paul Black Bear, J.H. Curtain (instructor), Ernest, and Koba.

Nation:
Format:
Photographic Print, B&W
Repository:
Cumberland County Historical Society
Teacher Mary Hyde and eight female students [version 1], c.1880

Studio portrait of teacher Mary Hyde and eight female students. The students are: Ann Laura (back left), Hattie Long Wolf (back middle), Rebecca Big Star (back right), Alice Wynn (middle row left), Grace Cook (middle row right), Mabel Doanmoe (bottom left), Stella Berht (bottom center), and Ruth (Looking Woman) (bottom right). The girls…

Format:
Glass Plate Negative
Repository:
National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Teacher Mary Hyde and eight female students [version 2], c.1880

Studio portrait of teacher Mary Hyde and eight female students. The students are: Ann Laura (back left), Hattie Long Wolf (back middle), Rebecca Big Star (back right), Alice Wynn (middle row left), Grace Cook (middle row right), Mabel Doanmoe (bottom left), Stella Berht (bottom center), and Ruth (Looking Woman) (bottom right). The girls all…

Format:
Photographic Print, B&W
Repository:
Cumberland County Historical Society
White Man and Stumbling Bear, c.1880

Studio portrait of White Man, an Apache chief, and Stumbling Bear, a Kiowa chief. 

Nation:
Format:
Photographic Print, B&W
Repository:
Cumberland County Historical Society
White Man and Stumbling Bear, visiting chiefs [version 1], c.1880

The caption reads: White Man Apache Chief    Stumbling Bear Kiowa Chief

Nation:
Format:
Photographic Print, B&W
Repository:
Dickinson College Archives & Special Collections