Davis, Richard

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Ellen Hansel Student File

Student file of Ellen Hansel, a member of the Pit River Nation, who entered the school on August 31, 1882, and ultimately departed on July 8, 1889. The student did not attend the school continuously, but left and reentered. The file contains student information cards, correspondence, a returned...

Repository: National Archives and Records Administration
Nellie Aspenall Student File

Student file of Nellie Aspenall, a member of the Pawnee Nation, who entered the school on August 31, 1882 and departed on June 30, 1891. The file contains a student information card, a position record card, and a report after leaving indicating Aspenall was a housewife living in King Fisher,...

Repository: National Archives and Records Administration
Percy Kable Student File

Student file of Percy Kable, a member of the Cheyenne Nation, who entered the school on October 22, 1883 and departed on July 6, 1888. The file contains a student information card, a former student response postcard, a letter/correspondence, a returned student survey, and a report after leaving...

Repository: National Archives and Records Administration
Richard Davis and Paul Good Bear, c.1888

Studio portrait of Richard Davis and Paul Good Bear. Davis is probably standing at left, in non-native clothing, and Good Bear is probably standing at right in school uniform. 

Format: Photographic Print, B&W
Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
Richard Davis Student File

Student file of Richard Davis, a member of the Cheyenne Nation, who entered the school on October 27, 1879, and ultimately departed on June 30, 1891. The student did not attend the school continuously, but left and reentered. The file contains student information cards, a photograph, a newspaper...

Repository: National Archives and Records Administration
Richard Davis Student Information Card

Student information card of Richard Davis, a member of the Cheyenne Nation, who entered the school on October 27, 1879 and departed on July 1, 1891. The file indicates Davis was living in Darlington, Oklahoma in 1913.

Repository: National Archives and Records Administration
Richard Davis, Nellie Aspenall, and their children [version 1], c. 1891

Studio portrait of Richard Davis and his wife, Nellie Aspenall Davis, with their two daughters, Richenda and Mary. Richard and Nellie were former students who married at the school and became staff members. Their daughters were not enrolled at the school. 

The handwritten note reads:...

Format: Photographic Print, B&W
Repository: Dickinson College Archives & Special Collections
Richard Davis, Nellie Aspenall, and their children [version 2], c. 1891

The caption reads: RICHARD DAVIS, CHEYENNE.

The printed note reads: Born 1867 at Sand Creek, Col., entered Carlisle 1879; learned the Printers' trade.  In 1888, married Nannie Aspenall, a Pawnee girl, at Carlisle, and worked for a Penna. farmer engages in raising...

Format: Photographic Print, B&W
Repository: National Archives and Records Administration
School News (Vol. 1, No. 2)
July 1880

The first article is by John Downing (Cherokee), titles “Learning How to Use Bad Things.” In which he writes about alcohol and the benefits of being nice to the people of the United States, and a letter from Moses Nonway to his mother asking on the health of his people and reflecting on their...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
Seven male students [version 1], c.1886

Studio portrait of Luke Phillips, Howard Logan, Frank Lock, Samuel Townsend, Roland Fish, Henry Kendall, and Richard Davis. All are wearing school uniforms. 

Format: Glass Plate Negative
Repository: National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Seven male students [version 2], c.1886

Studio portrait of Luke Phillips, Howard Logan, Frank Lock, Samuel Townsend, Roland Fish, Henry Kendall, and Richard Davis. All are wearing school uniforms.

Format: Photographic Print, B&W
Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
Ten male student printers [version 1], c.1885

Studio portrait of ten male students in uniform. 

The Cumberland County Historical Society's copy of this image identifies them as "Printer Boys." On one copy of the image they are identified as, left to right: William Butcher, Benajah Miles, Paul Boynton, Richard Davis, Samuel Townsend,...

Format: Glass Plate Negative
Repository: National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Ten male student printers [version 2], c.1885

Studio portrait of ten male students in uniform, identified as being "Printer Boys." On one copy of the image they are identified as, left to right: William Butcher, Benajah Miles, Paul Boynton, Richard Davis, Samuel Townsend, Cyrus Fell Star, Chester Cornelius, Benjamin Thomas, Henry North, and...

Format: Photographic Print, B&W
Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 1, No. 36)
April 16, 1886

The first page opened with a poem titled "There's Danger," about the evils of drink. Next appeared "In an Indian Camp: How to Cook Beans," adapted from the Cheyenne Transporter newspaper, about cleaning cooking utensils before using them. The article continued on page four. Page two...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 2, No. 20)
December 24, 1886

The first page featured the school Christmas greeting that included a drawing of the Man-on-the-band-stand that took up the entire front page of the newspaper. Page two opened with an article titled "Christmas" that described the Fourth of July and Christmas as national holidays, followed by...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 2, No. 21)
December 31, 1886

The first page opened with a poem titled "A Happy New Year to You," followed by a poem called "Santa Claus at Home," about his return to the North Pole. The next article, "The Cold Water Man," was about the dangers of drinking beer, reprinted from Maryland Bulletin. Also on the page was...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 2, No. 39)
May 6, 1887

The Indian Helper opened with a poem titled “A New Citizen,” written by Elsie Fuller (Omaha) who was a student at Hampton Institute, reprinted from “Talks and Thoughts.” The next article was an explanation of the Dawes Act written by Sen. Henry Dawes and titled “THE LAND IN SEVERALTY...

Repository: Dickinson College Archives & Special Collections
The Indian Helper (Vol. 3, No. 16)
November 25, 1887

The first page opened with a poem, "Thanksgiving Turkey," a play on the letters in the word "Turkey" followed by a description of the Acoma Pueblo by student Annie Thomas, entitled "A Queer Place To Live." This also was a subject of the article written about the monthly exhibition on page 3. The...

Repository: Dickinson College Archives & Special Collections
The Indian Helper (Vol. 3, No. 19)
December 16, 1887

The first page opened with an untitled poem about kindness, followed by "Part of Our Hospital Work," a reprint of a composition by Nancy Cornelius (Oneida) who detailed her experiences as a hospital assistant. She wrote about the breakfast routine and the Apache mothers caring for their babies...

Repository: Dickinson College Archives & Special Collections
The Indian Helper (Vol. 3, No. 32)
March 23, 1888

The first page opened with a poem, "Little Moments," followed by "A Letter," dated March 21, 1888 describing some of the Man-On-the-Band-Stand's observations. The next feature was an article about how to build a periscope. It was titled "Seeing Through a Brick," and continued on the fourth page...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 3, No. 34)
April 6, 1888

The first page opened with a poem "The Happy Philosopher," followed by "From the Indian Question to the Weather," a piece describing stereotypical prejudices and the importance of keeping Indians away from idle influences. Then came a report, "Our Guardhouse," extracted from essays by Richard...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 3, No. 43)
June 8, 1888

The first page opened with the poem, "What a Barrel of Whiskey Contains,” followed by an article titled “Welcome!” that reprinted Kish Hawkins’ (Cheyenne) address to a visiting group of Wilson College women. In the talk he described the Outing Program, industrial work, academic work and women’s...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 4, No. 14)
November 16, 1888

The first page opened with a poem, “Be Careful What You Say,” followed by “Indian Names,” on the origin of Indian names. Next came an article titled “Wanted, Something Inside,” about the value of persistence and perseverance, followed by small blurbs about the Christian population of Japan and...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 4, No. 18)
December 14, 1888

The first page opened with a poem titled “How To Make Up,” followed by an article reprinted from The Sabbath School Visitor titled “Playthings of the Indian Children.” Next came a letter from Nancy Cornelius (Oneida) titled “Items of Interest From Nancy Cornelius,” which was sent from the...

Repository: Dickinson College Archives & Special Collections
The Indian Helper (Vol. 4, No. 22)
January 18, 1889

The first page opened with a poem titled “Do We All?” followed by an article, “Do You Want to Get Rich?” about the value of saving little things. The next article, “Dr. Jackson at Our Missionary Meeting,” described the work of Sheldon Jackson among the Metlakahtla boys at the Sitka Industrial...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society

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