The Red Man (Vol. 7, No. 3)

November 1914

The press comments section covered a Supreme Court Case involving a group of Cherokees, who sought to recover interest on deferred payments. Arthur L. Stone, in the following article, told the story of the Dragon of Selish. Next, Domitilla wrote about the Stonish Giants who were defeated by the Shawnee. The following article, pulled from the St. Paul Pioneer Press, critiqued the habits of Chippewa chiefs. Another article, pulled from the same paper, covered modern methods adopted by Oklahoma Indians. Next, General Richard H.

The Red Man (Vol. 7, No. 1)

September 1914

This issue begins with the press comments section. The Indian Appropriation Bill, which appropriated 1.5 million dollars from Indian funds to improve health conditions, education, and agriculture, was discussed. The next article, which was pulled from The New York World, discussed the Story of Spo-Pee, “the silent Indian”. Arthur L. Stone, author of the next article, wrote about the Aboriginal horse trader of the Northwest. Next, Indian laws and treaties, relating to William Penn, were discussed by Charles J. Kappler.

The Red Man (Vol. 7, No. 2)

October 1914

In the opening press comments Indian policies, both past and present, were discussed. The first article, written by Harry L. Wells, was about the mound builders of the Mississippi, who Wells claimed descended from the pyramid builders of Egypt. Superintendent Oscar Lipps, in the next article, explained the history of the art of weaving, which was a common practice among Navajos. In an article pulled from the Boston Morning Herald, a 200-year old book written by Indians was discussed. In the final article Charles M.

The Red Man (Vol. 6, No. 7)

March 1914

The first article, written by Cato Sells, the Commissioner of Indian Affairs argued that the greatest danger to Indians is alcohol. Tied to this, Senator Robert L. Owen wrote about the suppression of liquor traffic. Next, Sharman Coolidge covered the efforts to uplift the Indian’s through enforcement of liquor regulations. E. B Merrit, Assistant Commissioner then covered his stance on the suppression of liquor traffic among Indians. The authors of the next article, Kate C. McBeth and Mazie Crawford told the story of the rise and fall of alcohol in the Nez Perce County.

Fourth Trip to National Archives

A fourth trip to continue scanning student files at the National Archives in Washington, DC is off to a snowy start. Dickinson College student interns Linda Genser ‘17, Joelle Paull ‘17, and Meghan Abercrombie ‘15 join Friends of the Library Intern Katie Clark, for a two week research trip. The team hopes to scan another 30 boxes of student files for the Carlisle Indian School Digital Resource Center.

Casper Cornelius Student File

Student file of Casper Cornelius, a member of the Oneida Nation, who entered the school on August 28, 1897 and ultimately departed on July 18, 1907. The student did not attend the school continuously, but left and reentered. The file contains student information cards, news clippings, a trade/position record card, a returned student survey, a photograph of the mill where Cornelius worked, a report after leaving, former student response postcards, and correspondence.

Harvey Warner Student File

Student file of Harvey Warner, a member of the Omaha Nation, who entered the school on August 19, 1882 and ultimately departed on March 28, 1895. The student did not attend the school continuously, but left and reentered. The file contains student information cards, a news clipping, a report after leaving, letters/correspondence related to financial transactions and Warner's son, Charles, attending the school, and a returned student survey that indicates Warner was a postmaster in Macy, Nebraska in 1911.

In school documentation Harvey Warner is also known as Harvey D. Warner.

Seneca Clark Cook Student File

Student file of Seneca Clark Cook, a member of the Onondaga Nation, who entered the school on September 3, 1907 and ultimately departed on May 29, 1913. The student did not attend the school continuously, but left and reentered. The file contains student information cards, an application for enrollment, an outing record, medical/physical records, a trade/position record card, a progress/conduct card, and correspondence. Before arriving at Carlisle, Cook attended the Lincoln Institute in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

Francis Freemont (The-tha-tha-ga) Student File

Student file of Francis Freemont, a member of the Omaha Nation, who entered the school on September 7, 1895, and ultimately departed on October 9, 1906. The student did not attend the school continuously, but left and reentered. The file contains student information cards, an application for enrollment, progress/conduct cards from Dickinson College Preparatory School (Conway Hall), a returned student survey, and a report after leaving. The file indicates Freemont was a farmer in Walthill, Nebraska in 1910.