Pawnee

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The Indian Helper (Vol. 3, No. 14)
November 11, 1887

The first page featured a poem "Work While You Work" followed by "A Pawnee Medicine-Dance" which continued the story from number 14 told by Aunt Martha about Pawnee medicine men and their dances. The second page had news of returned students whose terms at Carlisle were completed, including...

Repository: Dickinson College Archives & Special Collections
The Indian Helper (Vol. 4, No. 17)
December 7, 1888

This issue opened with a poem titled “HOW," by John Boyle O'Reilly, followed by news from a letter from Carlisle alumnus Samuel Townsend (Pawnee), a student at Marietta College. Page two included news items about Congress convening, Nancy Cornelius (Oneida) attending the Woman's National Indian...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 4, No. 24)
February 1, 1889

The first page began with an untitled poem that opened with the first line “We can never be too careful,” followed by “Which Would You Rather Be a Spider or a Fly? / The White Man Like a Spider,” an account of Mr. Seger’s description of the idiosyncrasies of language translation. It continued on...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 4, No. 27)
February 22, 1889

The first page began with the heading, “February 22,” followed by poems and articles about George Washington and his birthday. Also on the page was a piece called “Do Indian Boys Have It?” about the pitfalls of self-conceit. Page two included many small articles that included an update of area...

Repository: Dickinson College Archives & Special Collections
The Indian Helper (Vol. 4, No. 34)
April 12, 1889

The first page began with a poem titled, “Dr. Nature’s Prescription,” followed by “How One of the Printer Boys Came Out Ahead,” which described how a printer, against the advice of his instructor, was able to repair faulty equipment using his own problem solving technique. This was followed by a...

Repository: Dickinson College Archives & Special Collections
The Indian Helper (Vol. 4, No. 35)
April 19, 1889

The first page began with a poem titled, “Easter Blossoms,” followed by a notice of “The Wedding” between Guy LeRoy Stevick and Marion Pratt, the daughter of Capt. Pratt. The ceremony was performed by Rev. Dr. Norcross of Second Presbyterian Church followed by a reception for 500 guests in the...

Repository: Dickinson College Archives & Special Collections
The Indian Helper (Vol. 4, No. 44)
June 21, 1889

The first page opened with a poem by Fannie Bolton titled “It is Time,” followed by “The Experience of a Bull: A Child’s Version of the Recent Flood at Lewistown,” followed by “A Busy Indian Boy in the Country” which was Wallace Scott’s (Pueblo) description of his farm experience in Bucks County...

Repository: Dickinson College Archives & Special Collections
The Indian Helper (Vol. 4, No. 7)
September 28, 1888

The first page opened with an untitled poem warning of the evils of debt, followed by “Eet, Kit-E-Ko Give It To Me: A True Story,” about fictional Aunt Martha’s exasperation after generously giving away all her potatoes to hungry Pawnee women. The story continued on page four. Page two featured...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 5, No. 20)
January 17, 1890

The first page opened with a poem titled "Hoe Out Your Row," followed by "A Worthy Example," that touted a fictional conversation between two boys musing on the accomplishments of Indian Commissioner T. J. Morgan. Page two included several articles and notices about country life for Outing...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 7, No. 11)
November 20, 1891

The first page opened with a poem titled "A Thanksgiving Prayer," by D.H. Kent in Home Magazine, followed by "Fourteen Years a Missionary Among the Oneidas," which was the title of a letter to the Indian Helper from Rev. S. W. Ford, Oconto, Wisconsin. Page two included articles...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Morning Star (Vol. 4, No. 2)
September 1883

Page one had “Local Items” which consisted of small daily events such as the weather and games the students invented. Page two started with “A Plea for Greater Liberality in the Cause of Indian Education”, followed by “The People Responsible”, and “A Devoted Indian Missionary Dead”, which talked...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Morning Star (Vol. 4, No. 5)
December 1883

Page one opened with an article titled “Strong Words for the Indians From Commissioner Price”, along with “A Plea for Civilized Indians”, “Two Pueblo Boys”, and “The Baby”. Page two had Captain Pratt’s account of his visit to the west. It also had comments from various chiefs on their opinion on...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The School News (Vol. 1, No. 11)
April 1881

The opening article was written by Michael Burns (Apache), and focused on “The Indian Question.” In it he explains how many Indians falsely believe that white men are wiser simply because they are born white, and argues that their wisdom comes not from their skin color, but from more easily...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The School News (Vol. 2, No. 1)
June 1881

Page one opens with a letter from Lucius Aitson (Kiowa) to his father describing an illness he had that left him bed ridden for two weeks and how fond her is of English. Also on this page is a short bit from Nellie Robertson (Sioux) about the story of Moses. The next page had an article titled “...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The School News (Vol. 2, No. 10)
March 1882

The first page opened with Dessie Prescott narrating the school trip to Philadelphia. While there, they saw toys, went to the Grand Depot, and sang for money for the school. Page two had an article about Tobacco, its side effects, and why it should not be used. Following was a letter exchange...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The School News (Vol. 2, No. 3)
August 1881

The August edition opens with an Article on the need to be useful the Carlisle Children feel, and how badly the writer felt when unable to work while sick. It continued onto page four. Page two brings Samuel Townsend (Pawnee) stepping down as editor with Charles Kihega (Iowa) taking his place....

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
Thirteen male student printers [version 1], c.1886

Studio portrait of thirteen male students, all wearing school uniforms. The caption of this and other copies identifies them as working in the print shop. 

Other copies identify the students. They are: 

1. Bennie Thomas, 2. Lorenzo Martinez, 3. Willie Butcher, 4. C. P. Cornelius, 5...

Format: Glass Plate Negative
Repository: National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Thirteen male student printers [version 2], c.1886

Studio portrait of thirteen male students wearing school uniforms.

The printed note on the reverse side reads: 1. Bennie Thomas, Pueblo Tribe, 2. Lorenzo Martinez, Pueblo, 3. Willie Butcher, Chippewa, 4. C. P. Cornelius, Oneida, 5. Dennison Wheelock, Oneida, 6....

Format: Photographic Print, B&W
Repository: Dickinson College Archives & Special Collections
Thirteen Pawnee students, c.1883

Studio portrait captioned as "Pawnee Indian group that entered the Carlisle Indian School in 1882." If that is accurate, then the sitters include: Louis Bayhylle, Frank West, Chalkley Stafford, Abram Platt, Thomas Kester, Bruce Hayman, Henry Eagle Chief, Minnie Topa, and Nellie Aspenall. Those...

Format: Photographic Print, B&W
Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
Thomas Hand Student File

Student file of Thomas Hand, a member of the Pawnee Nation, who entered the school August 24, 1905, and departed May 27, 1906. The file contains a student information card, an application for enrollment, and a report after leaving that indicates Hand was working as a laborer in Pawnee, Oklahoma...

Repository: National Archives and Records Administration
Thomas Hand Student Information Card

Student information card of Thomas Hand, a member of the Pawnee Nation, who entered the school on August 24, 1905 and departed on May 27, 1906.

Repository: National Archives and Records Administration
Thomas Kester Student Information Card

Student information card of Thomas Kester (here Kesto), a member of the Pawnee Nation, who entered the school on August 31, 1882 and departed on March 28, 1887.

Repository: National Archives and Records Administration
Thomas Kester Student Information Card

Student information card of Thomas Kester, a member of the Pawnee Nation, who entered the school on August 31, 1882 and departed on March 28, 1887.

Repository: National Archives and Records Administration
Track Team members, c.1908

The reverse side reads: Edgar Moore.

View of Edgar Moore with other members of the track team around 1908. Fellow team member Louis Dupuis is standing on the far right.

Format: Photographic Print, B&W
Repository: National Archives and Records Administration
Twenty-four male students upon arrival, 1883

Portrait of twenty-four male students upon arrival. The Cumberland County Historical Society's cataloging identifies them as from the Cheyenne, Arapahoe, Comanche, Pawnee, and Nez Perce nations and that the photo was taken on the date of their arrival, October 22, 1883. Twenty-three male...

Format: Photographic Print, B&W
Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society

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