Apache

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Displaying 651 - 675 of 758 records
Susie Nachekea, Charles Istee, and Gail Marko, c.1888

Studio portrait of Susie Nachekea (standing at left), Charles Istee (standing at rear), and Gail Marko (seated at right). 

Format: Photographic Print, B&W
Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
Cemetery Stock Image

Cemetery information and mortuary documents related to Susie Reed, a member of the Apache Nation.

Susie Reid Student Information Card

Student information card of Susie Reid, a member of the Apache Nation, who entered the school on June 22, 1891 and died on July 29, 1895. She was buried in the cemetry on the school grounds under the name "Susie Reed." 

Repository: National Archives and Records Administration
Susie Reid Student Information Card

Student information card of Susie Reid, a member of the Apache Nation, who entered the school on June 22, 1891 and died on July 29, 1895. She was buried in the cemetry on the school grounds under the name "Susie Reed." 

Repository: National Archives and Records Administration
Talbot Goday (Go-day) Student File

Student file of Talbot Goday, a member of the Apache Nation, who entered the school on April 30, 1887, and departed on November 10, 1890.  The file contains student information cards and a report after leaving indicating that, in 1910, Goday was working as an Indian Agency scout in Fort Sill,...

Repository: National Archives and Records Administration
Talbot Goday Student Information Card

Student information card of Talbot Goday, a member of the Apache Nation, who entered the school on April 30, 1887 and departed on November 10, 1890.

Repository: National Archives and Records Administration
Talbot Goday, c.1888

Studio portrait of Talboy Goday wearing school uniform. 

Format: Photographic Print, B&W
Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
Talbot Goday, c.1889

Studio portrait of Talbot Goday. 

Format: Glass Plate Negative
Repository: National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Tennyson Berry (Ah-ko-bah-setine) Student File

Student file of Tennyson Berry (Ah-ko-bah-setine), a member of the Apache nation, who entered the school on September 11, 1898 and departed on June 27, 1900. The file contains student information cards, a photograph, a returned student survey, a former student response postcard, a news clipping...

Repository: National Archives and Records Administration
Tennyson Berry Student Information Card

Student information card of Tennyson Berry, a member of the Apache Nation, who entered the school on September 11, 1898 and departed on June 27, 1900. The file indicates Berry was living in Fort Cobb, Oklahoma in 1913.

Repository: National Archives and Records Administration
The Indian Helper (Vol. 2, No. 32)
March 18, 1887

The first page opened with a poem titled “Take the Sunny Side,” by “Ex.” Also found on that page was “An Interesting Letter from John Dixon, One of Our Pueblo Boys Who Went to His Home in New Mexico Last Summer” addressed to Mr. Campbell. Dixon wrote about celebrating George Washington’s...

Repository: Dickinson College Archives & Special Collections
The Indian Helper (Vol. 2, No. 33)
March 25, 1887

The first page opened with a poem titled “The Girls that are Wanted,” author unknown, followed by “An Indian Dance: By Dessie Prescott, One of Our Pupils.” Also on the page was an article about the importance for Americans to know their history. Page two opened with a treatise on patriotism,...

Repository: Dickinson College Archives & Special Collections
The Indian Helper (Vol. 2, No. 37)
April 22, 1887

This issue opened with a poem titled “Kindness” followed by a reprint from the Word Carrier, “Manners” that compared ill-mannered behavior to animal traits and was intended as a lesson to Carlisle students. Also on that page was a paragraph reprinted from the Genoa Indian School...

Repository: Dickinson College Archives & Special Collections
The Indian Helper (Vol. 2, No. 38)
April 29, 1887

This issue opened with a poem titled “For Us, As Well as Others,” by Mary H. Krout, followed by “A True Story” shared by “Aunt Martha” about some mistaken identities among the Sioux and Pawness in Nebraska. The story continued on the fourth page. Page two included a reprint of Carlos Montezuma’s...

Repository: Dickinson College Archives & Special Collections
The Indian Helper (Vol. 2, No. 39)
May 6, 1887

The Indian Helper opened with a poem titled “A New Citizen,” written by Elsie Fuller (Omaha) who was a student at Hampton Institute, reprinted from “Talks and Thoughts.” The next article was an explanation of the Dawes Act written by Sen. Henry Dawes and titled “THE LAND IN SEVERALTY...

Repository: Dickinson College Archives & Special Collections
The Indian Helper (Vol. 2, No. 42)
May 27, 1887

The first page opened with the poem "Take Care" followed by "A Visitor at Carlisle" which provided the opportunity to present arguments for Indian education away from the reservations. It continued on page four. Page two opened with an account of a presentation by "Dr. Harmon and Col. Thomas," a...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 2, No. 46)
June 24, 1887

The first page opened with the poem "What a Jug Did," reprinted from An Old Scrap Book followed by a piece called "Nice Letter from Mr. Standing," made up of abstracts from his trip West returning Carlisle students to their home agencies. Standing mentioned there was a special travel...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 3, No. 21)
January 6, 1888

The first page opened with a poem, "What Time Is It?" followed by the story of Indian women whose harvested cache of vegetables had been stolen. The story was titled, "How Some Indians Were Made to Suffer by Their Enemies: A True Story by a Dear, Kind Lady Who Lived For Many Years Among Them."...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 3, No. 5)
September 9, 1887

The first page opened with a short poem followed by a  conversation continued from previous weeks between Marianna Burgess and the Man-on-the-band-stand describing her recruitment trip among the Rosebud and Pine Ridge Sioux. Page two reported contents of letters from student Josephine Bordeaux (...

Repository: Dickinson College Archives & Special Collections
The Indian Helper (Vol. 4, No. 24)
February 1, 1889

The first page began with an untitled poem that opened with the first line “We can never be too careful,” followed by “Which Would You Rather Be a Spider or a Fly? / The White Man Like a Spider,” an account of Mr. Seger’s description of the idiosyncrasies of language translation. It continued on...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 4, No. 33)
April 5, 1889

The first page began with a poem titled, “The Tongue,” followed by the Man-on-the-band-stand’s discussion in “Never Before,” that explained that a horde of boys would be marching east toward opportunity but a horde of boys would be marching west toward degradation, which he described as “evil...

Repository: Dickinson College Archives & Special Collections
The Indian Helper (Vol. 4, No. 37)
May 3, 1889

The first page began with a poem titled, “from The Memories of the Past and the Duties of the Present,” by John W. Woodside, followed by a reprint of a letter from former student Clarence Three Stars (Sioux) that reported conditions from his home titled “A Newsy Letter from Pine Ridge Agency: By...

Repository: Dickinson College Archives & Special Collections
The Indian Helper (Vol. 4, No. 38)
May 10, 1889

The first page began with an untitled poem with a first line of “God gave us hands – one left one right,” followed by an article describing the seeds of success titled “When It Tells.” The next article was about the Ayan Indians who fish salmon on the Yukon River titled “Sharp-sighted Indians,”...

Repository: Dickinson College Archives & Special Collections
The Indian Helper (Vol. 4, No. 42)
June 7, 1889

The first page opened with a poem by Susan Coolidge titled “New Every Morning,” followed by a letter from Ernie Black (Cheyenne) titled “News from our Cheyenne and Arapahoe Boys.” Also on the page was a reprint from The Sunday School Times titled “We Must Be Run Through a Mill.” Page...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 4, No. 44)
June 21, 1889

The first page opened with a poem by Fannie Bolton titled “It is Time,” followed by “The Experience of a Bull: A Child’s Version of the Recent Flood at Lewistown,” followed by “A Busy Indian Boy in the Country” which was Wallace Scott’s (Pueblo) description of his farm experience in Bucks County...

Repository: Dickinson College Archives & Special Collections

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