Sparhawk, Frances

Displaying 1 - 5 of 5 records
The Indian Helper (Vol. 3, No. 35)
April 13, 1888

The first page opened with a poem, "Boy and Man," followed by "Two Carlisle Indian  Boys Stop Under the Walnut Tree, and Talk," contrasting an honest, hard working boy to a lazy, ungrateful boy. It continued on the fourth page. Page two featured news and greetings from returned students, an article "School Room Sentences," that encouraged using…

Format:
Newspapers
Repository:
Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 3, No. 47)
July 6, 1888

The first page opened with a poem by Sarah E. Eastman reprinted from “Golden Days,” titled “If! If!” followed by the reprinted letter from a Carlisle Indian School student on Outing called “She Wants a Higher Education.” The last piece on the page continues on the fourth page called “A Modern Pueblo” about the process by which a progressive…

Nation:
Format:
Newspapers
Repository:
Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 4, No. 42)
June 7, 1889

The first page opened with a poem by Susan Coolidge titled “New Every Morning,” followed by a letter from Ernie Black (Cheyenne) titled “News from our Cheyenne and Arapahoe Boys.” Also on the page was a reprint from The Sunday School Times titled “We Must Be Run Through a Mill.” Page two opened with a quote from Paul Boynton (Arapho)…

Format:
Newspapers
Repository:
Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 4, No. 44)
June 21, 1889

The first page opened with a poem by Fannie Bolton titled “It is Time,” followed by “The Experience of a Bull: A Child’s Version of the Recent Flood at Lewistown,” followed by “A Busy Indian Boy in the Country” which was Wallace Scott’s (Pueblo) description of his farm experience in Bucks County. Page two featured a notice of the new premium…

Format:
Newspapers
Repository:
Dickinson College Archives & Special Collections
The Indian Helper (Vol. 5, No. 18)
December 20, 1889

The first page opened with a poem titled "A Christmas Carol by Eleanor W.F. Bates in Home Magazine. Next came a new installment of the series titled “How An Indian Girl Might Tell Her Own Story if She Had the Chance: Founded on Actual Observations of the Man-on-the-band-stand’s Chief Clerk” (continued from the previous week). In this…

Format:
Newspapers
Repository:
Cumberland County Historical Society