Chief Killer

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Chief Killer and his family, 1886

Studio portrait of Chief Killer, a Cheyenne chief, with his wife and five children. Chief Killer is seated at left and his wife is seated at right. Standing behind them are two young women and one young man, all dressed in Carlisle uniforms. One of the girls is almost certainly student Maud...

Format: Glass Plate Negative
Repository: National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Maud Chief Killer Student File

Student file of Maud Chief Killer, a member of the Cheyenne Nation, who entered the school on August 31, 1882, and departed on June 14, 1887. The file contains student information cards, and a report after leaving indicating Chief Killer was working as a housekeeper in Calumet, Oklahoma in 1910...

Repository: National Archives and Records Administration
Maud Chief Killer Student Information Card

Student information card of Maud Chief Killer, a member of the Cheyenne Nation, who entered the school on August 31, 1882 and departed on June 14, 1887.

Note: Chief Killer married fellow student Colonel Elk Horn also known as Colonel Horn. 

Repository: National Archives and Records Administration
Nonie Chief Killer (No-nic-ki-si) Student File

Student file of Nonie Chief Killer (No-ni-ki-si), a member of the Cheyenne Nation, who entered the school on September 21, 1886, and departed on December 7, 1886. The file contains student information cards and a report after leaving indicating that Chief Killer was working as a housekeeper in...

Repository: National Archives and Records Administration
Nonie Chief Killer (No-nic-ki-si) Student Information Card

Student information card of Nonie Chief Killer (No-nic-ki-si), a member of the Cheyenne Nation, who entered the school on September 21, 1886 and departed on December 7, 1886.

Repository: National Archives and Records Administration
The Indian Helper (Vol. 2, No. 14)
November 12, 1886

The first page opened with a poem titled "A Fourteen-Year-Old Girl's Good Advice," followed by an article called "The Menomonees and Pottawatomies Dance: A Story by Lucy Jordan, Stockbridge, a pupil from Wisconsin," that told of an 1882 visit by dancers to her home agency in Keshena, Wisconsin....

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
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