The Red Man (Vol. 7, No. 9-10)

May/June 1915
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The press comments section opened the issue. Will M. Maupin wrote the first article in which he discussed the need for schools on Indian lands. Maupin referred to the Genoa Indian School in Nebraska as an example of excellence. Next, Charles E. Waterman discussed Metalluk, the last of the Ananagunticooks who used to roam the valley of the Androscoggin. In the next article, author Key Wolf covered success of the Indian Day School as a community center. The final article, pulled from the New York Press, discussed the problems that faced Indians in New York.

The Red Man (Vol. 7, No. 8)

April 1915
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The issue opened with an editorial comment on the Everglade Seminoles and the desire to open the Colville Reservation to settlement. The press comments section followed. The first article, written by F. F. Avery,discussed the Colville Indians and their industrial approaches and practices. The use of funds was particularly notable in the article. The following article, by Minnie Moore Wilson, covered the rights of the Florida Seminoles and their connection to the Everglades.

The Red Man (Vol. 7, No. 7)

March 1915
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The opening press comments section included various articles, pulled from newspapers across the country, about American Indians. The first article, written by John Ris, wrote about "Paiute Country" in the Southwest. Next, Charles E. Waterman wrote about Catherine, a member of the Ojibway Nation. The next article, pulled from the Bennet County Booster, discussed a fable about the friendship between an Indian and a white man. The final article was a poem about life before white settlers entered North America, and was written by R. H. Adams.

The Red Man (Vol. 7, No. 6)

February 1915
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The press comments section opened with news articles about engineering feats of Indians. The first article, pulled from the Century Magazine, discussed Chief Joseph of the Nez Perce. Courtney Ryley Cooper, author of the next article, wrote about the Battle of Wounded Knee. The final article, pulled from the Boston Herald, detailed the studies of the homes of cliff dwellers in New Mexico and Arizona.

The Red Man (Vol. 7. No. 5)

January 1915
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The opening press comments section compiled excerpts from various news outlets that discussed Indian affairs. In the first article, Minnie Moore-Wilson wrote about the oppression of the Florida Seminoles, and their rights. Arthur C. Parker discussed the memorial of the Society of American Indians. Next, Edwin L. Sabin wrote about the Pueblo Indians and the importance of fiestas in their culture. C. Henry Dickerman, author of the final article, discussed basket making techniques.

The Red Man (Vol. 7, No. 4)

December 1914
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Superintendent Oscar Lipps opened the issue with a dedication to Gabe E. Parker, a Choctaw Indian who became the Superintendent of the Five Civilized Tribes. In the press comments section Canadian Indians, as well as the newest census were discussed. In an article pulled from the New York Post, General Hugh L. Scott who worked extensively with Indians was discussed. Next, the Navajo Fair was covered. The fair had displays and exhibits illustrating Navajo culture and products. Charles A.

The Red Man (Vol. 7, No. 3)

November 1914
The Red Man (Vol. 7 No. 3) Cover

The press comments section covered a Supreme Court Case involving a group of Cherokees, who sought to recover interest on deferred payments. Arthur L. Stone, in the following article, told the story of the Dragon of Selish. Next, Domitilla wrote about the Stonish Giants who were defeated by the Shawnee. The following article, pulled from the St. Paul Pioneer Press, critiqued the habits of Chippewa chiefs. Another article, pulled from the same paper, covered modern methods adopted by Oklahoma Indians. Next, General Richard H.

The Red Man (Vol. 7, No. 1)

September 1914
The Red Man (Vol. 7, No. 1)

This issue begins with the press comments section. The Indian Appropriation Bill, which appropriated 1.5 million dollars from Indian funds to improve health conditions, education, and agriculture, was discussed. The next article, which was pulled from The New York World, discussed the Story of Spo-Pee, “the silent Indian”. Arthur L. Stone, author of the next article, wrote about the Aboriginal horse trader of the Northwest. Next, Indian laws and treaties, relating to William Penn, were discussed by Charles J. Kappler.

The Red Man (Vol. 7, No. 2)

October 1914
The Red Man (Vol. 7, No. 2) Cover

In the opening press comments Indian policies, both past and present, were discussed. The first article, written by Harry L. Wells, was about the mound builders of the Mississippi, who Wells claimed descended from the pyramid builders of Egypt. Superintendent Oscar Lipps, in the next article, explained the history of the art of weaving, which was a common practice among Navajos. In an article pulled from the Boston Morning Herald, a 200-year old book written by Indians was discussed. In the final article Charles M.

The Red Man (Vol. 6, No. 7)

March 1914
The Red Man (Vol. 6, No. 7)

The first article, written by Cato Sells, the Commissioner of Indian Affairs argued that the greatest danger to Indians is alcohol. Tied to this, Senator Robert L. Owen wrote about the suppression of liquor traffic. Next, Sharman Coolidge covered the efforts to uplift the Indian’s through enforcement of liquor regulations. E. B Merrit, Assistant Commissioner then covered his stance on the suppression of liquor traffic among Indians. The authors of the next article, Kate C. McBeth and Mazie Crawford told the story of the rise and fall of alcohol in the Nez Perce County.

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