Cumberland County Historical Society

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The Indian Helper (Vol. 4, No. 17)
December 7, 1888

This issue opened with a poem titled “HOW," by John Boyle O'Reilly, followed by news from a letter from Carlisle alumnus Samuel Townsend (Pawnee), a student at Marietta College. Page two included news items about Congress convening, Nancy Cornelius (Oneida) attending the Woman's National Indian...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 4, No. 19)
December 21, 1888

The first page opened with a poem titled “GOD'S CHRISTMAS GIFTS," by Dwight Weldon. Also on the page were numerous Christmas articles, including a piece about the spirit of giving called "A MERRY CHRISTMAS! A HAPPY NEW YEAR!" and a reprint from Sunshine about the meaning of A.D. 1888....

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 4, No. 21)
January 11, 1889

The first page opened with a poem titled “?” in the shape of a question mark followed by a bit by A-Te-Ka called “A Capful of Prairie Chickens,” in which she described the process of surrogate prairie chicken eggs that perished after being hatched by a domestic chicken. Page two contained short...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 4, No. 22)
January 18, 1889

The first page opened with a poem titled “Do We All?” followed by an article, “Do You Want to Get Rich?” about the value of saving little things. The next article, “Dr. Jackson at Our Missionary Meeting,” described the work of Sheldon Jackson among the Metlakahtla boys at the Sitka Industrial...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 4, No. 24)
February 1, 1889

The first page began with an untitled poem that opened with the first line “We can never be too careful,” followed by “Which Would You Rather Be a Spider or a Fly? / The White Man Like a Spider,” an account of Mr. Seger’s description of the idiosyncrasies of language translation. It continued on...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 4, No. 26)
February 15, 1889

The first page began with an untitled poem that began with the first line, “Waste not moments, no, nor words,” followed by A-Te-Ka’s letter to the Man-on-the-band-stand titled “It Took Eight Years to Discover a Mistake.” The letter recalled a December 1881 article on early student art work from...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 4, No. 28)
March 1, 1889

The first page began with a poem titled, “This Life is What We Make It,” followed by a letter from Samuel Townsend (Pawnee) about school life at Marietta College. The second page included news from letters from former students and an excerpted speech from Thomas Metoxen (Oneida).

Among...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 4, No. 29)
March 8, 1889

The first page opened with a poem "March" by Bessie Chandler followed by an article titled "Feasted By the Blind" which was an account of visiting students from the Pennsylvania Institution for the Instruction of the Blind who got a tour of the Indian school and gave an entertainment that...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 4, No. 3)
August 31, 1888

The first page opened with a poem, “Good Advice,” followed by a fictional account of a conversation titled “Two Carlisle Boys at Pine Ridge Talk Over the Sioux Bill,” in which two former students, Zack and Tim, discuss the merits of signing the Severalty Act which had been presented to the...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 4, No. 30)
March 15, 1889

The first page opened with a poem "Think," followed by a story called "Are Indians Kind to Animals? about a Carlisle girl on Outing who threw a blanket over a horse during icy weather. The next piece was about the value of labor titled "Successful Men." Page two began with an article titled "...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 4, No. 31)
March 22, 1889

The first page began with a poem titled, “True Heroism,” followed by a fictional conversation among two Indian School students, Tom and Phil as reported by the Man-On-The-Band-Stand. In the moralizing story, continued on the fourth page, Phil sets a good example by keeping the Outing System...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 4, No. 32)
March 29, 1889

The first page opened with a poem "The Voice That Wins Its Way" contributed by Hannah E. Wilson, followed by a piece called "From John Dixon" which was reprinted from the Albuquerque Indian School where Dixon (Pueblo) was employed as a carpenter and translator for Indian school recruitment. The...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 4, No. 36)
April 26, 1889

The first page opened with a poem "The Printer-Boy Tramp” by Will Carleton, followed by “Encouraging Prospects” about Luther Kuhns at the Pawnee Agency. Next came “A Man Who was not Afraid to Work” on how General Washington set an example for his corporal. Also on the page was an article titled...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 4, No. 42)
June 7, 1889

The first page opened with a poem by Susan Coolidge titled “New Every Morning,” followed by a letter from Ernie Black (Cheyenne) titled “News from our Cheyenne and Arapahoe Boys.” Also on the page was a reprint from The Sunday School Times titled “We Must Be Run Through a Mill.” Page...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 4, No. 43)
June 14, 1889

The first page opened with a poem "Wanted,” followed by a fictitious conversation titled “Sallie Lump-of-Mud and Little Miss Sensible Have a Talk.” The page ended with news from Harriet Elder (Nez Perce) and her agency, titled “This Was My Name When at School – Harriet M. Elder.” Page two...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 4, No. 45)
June 28, 1889

A description of this document is not currently available.

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 4, No. 48)
July 19, 1889

A description of this document is not currently available.

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 4, No. 49)
July 26, 1889

The first page opened with a Longfellow poem "The Ladder of St. Augustine” followed by James Black Hawk’s letter about the Fourth of July at Pine Ridge Agency titled “In the Right Spirit.” Page one also contained “Doing His Duty,” about how a seemingly unrecognized worker was promoted because of...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 4, No. 5)
September 14, 1888

The first page opened with a poem, “The Golden Keys,” followed by a letter from Richard Davis (Cheyenne) who lived in West Grove, PA and ran a dairy farm there. There was an article called “No Wonder Indians Get Along Slowly,” and news from Joseph Schweigman (Sioux) at the Rosebud Agency titled...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 4, No. 50)
August 2, 1889

A description of this document is not currently available.

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 4, No. 51)
August 9, 1889

The first page opened with a poem "Willie’s First Boots” followed by “What Lawrence Learned,” about how Right Time and Right Place brought a boy success, reprinted from Wide Awake. Page two opened with a travelogue through California and Arizona to the Grand Canyon titled “Elevation –...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 4, No. 52)
August 16, 1889

The first page opened with a poem "Our Orderly,” about a seven-year-old Apache boy. The next article, “On A Band Stand,” was about children telling stories on the band stand, which continued on the fourth page. Page two opened with excerpts of letters “From the Out Pupils,” followed by the...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 4, No. 6)
September 21, 1888

The first page opened with an untitled poem by J. W. Burgess reprinted from Sunshine, followed by “Our Walnut Tree” about the Man-On-the-Band-Stand’s efforts to keep students from picking green walnuts. The second page began with “The Captain,” which described the speech Capt. Pratt...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 4, No. 7)
September 28, 1888

The first page opened with an untitled poem warning of the evils of debt, followed by “Eet, Kit-E-Ko Give It To Me: A True Story,” about fictional Aunt Martha’s exasperation after generously giving away all her potatoes to hungry Pawnee women. The story continued on page four. Page two featured...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 4, No. 8)
October 5, 1888

The first page opened with a poem “The Two Words,” followed by Lucy Jordan’s letter to the Man-On-The-Band-Stand titled “Carlisle A Bright Picture” in which she mused about her days’ past at Carlisle and life at home on the Stockbridge Reservation. Next came “A Budget of News from Eliza Bell” (...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society

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