Standing Bear, Luther

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Arrival of 68 Students from Rosebud and Pine Ridge Agencies
December 1, 1882

Richard Henry Pratt reports the arrival of 68 students at the Carlisle Indian School from the Rosebud and Pine Ridge Agencies.

Format: Letters/Correspondence
Repository: National Archives and Records Administration
Eadle Keatah Toh (Vol. 1, No. 12)
July 1881

Page one opened with a piece titled “The Future of the Red Indian,” reprinted from the London Spectator. This interesting article begins with the author describing the activities of the Carlisle Indian School for a British audience before then discussing his reaction to seeing...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
Explanation of Disallowances Made By Treasury Department in Account Settlements
May 5, 1887

Richard Henry Pratt responds to a statement from the Second Auditor of the Treasury in settlement of his accounts from the fourth quarter of 1884 to and including the fourth quarter of 1885. Pratt goes through a list of transportation costs that were disallowed due to a portion of the road being...

Format: Letters/Correspondence
Repository: National Archives and Records Administration
Former Student Survey Responses, 1890 (Part 1 of 5)
June 2-9, 1890

A series of sixteen letters written to Captain Richard H. Pratt in response to a questionnaire sent to former students. The accompanying questionnaire forms are not included.

Transcripts follow each handwritten letter.

Format: Letters/Correspondence
Repository: National Archives and Records Administration
Four male Sioux students [version 1], c.1879

Four male students posed outside a building, presumably on the school grounds. They are: Norman (Wants To Be Chief), Luther Standing Bear (Kills Plenty), Reuben Quick Bear (Kills the Enemy), and Raymond Stewart (Paints Dust). 

Format: Glass Plate Negative, Stereograph
Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
Four male Sioux students [version 2], c.1879

Four male students posed outside a building, presumably on the school grounds. They are: Norman (Wants to be Chief), Luther Standing Bear (Kills Plenty), Reuben Quick Bear (Kills the Enemy), and Raymond Stewart (Paints Dust). 

Format: Stereograph
Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
Joshua Given [?], Luther Standing Bear, and an unidentified male student, c.1882

Studio portrait of Joshua Given [?], Luther Standing Bear, and an unidentified male student, all wearing school uniforms.

Format: Glass Plate Negative
Repository: National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Luther Standing Bear (Kills Plenty) Student File

Student file of Luther Standing Bear, a member of the Sioux Nation, who entered the school on October 6, 1879 and departed on July 6, 1885. The file contains a student information card, former student response postcards, news clippings, correspondence, a returned student survey, and a report...

Repository: National Archives and Records Administration
Luther Standing Bear (Ota Kte) Student Information Card

Student information card of Luther Standing Bear (Ota Kte), a member of the Sioux Nation, who entered the school on October 6, 1879 and departed on July 6, 1885. The file indicates Standing Bear was living in Sioux City, Iowa in 1913.

Repository: National Archives and Records Administration
Luther Standing Bear and Willard Standing Bear, c.1883

Studio portrait of Luther Standing Bear and Willard Standing Bear.

The caption reads: Luther and Willard

Format: Glass Plate Negative
Repository: Dickinson College Archives & Special Collections
Luther Standing Bear with cornet [version 1], c.1883

Studio portrait of Luther Standing Bear holding a cornet. 

Format: Glass Plate Negative
Repository: National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Luther Standing Bear with cornet [version 2], c.1883

Studio portrait of Luther Standing Bear holding a cornet.

Format: Photographic Print, B&W
Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
Luther Standing Bear, c.1880

Studio portrait of Luther Standing Bear. 

Format: Glass Plate Negative
Repository: National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Standing Bear and Luther Standing Bear [version 1], c.1881

Studio portrait of Standing Bear, a Sioux chief, with his son, Luther Standing Bear.

Format: Glass Plate Negative
Repository: National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Standing Bear and Luther Standing Bear [version 2], c.1881

Studio portrait of Standing Bear, a Sioux chief, with his son, Luther Standing Bear. 

Format: Photographic Print, B&W
Repository: Swedish National Museums of World Culture
Standing Bear with eight male students and one young white boy, c.1881

Studio portrait of a visiting chief Standing Bear with eight male students and a young white boy. His son, Luther Standing Bear, is standing behind him on the right wearing a dark coat. 

Format: Glass Plate Negative
Repository: National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Standing Bear, Luther Standing Bear, and Red Fish, c. 1882

Studio portrait of Standing Bear, a Sioux chief, with his son Luther Standing Bear, and Red Fish, another Sioux chief.

The handwritten note on the reverse side reads:  1  Standing Bear,  2  Standing Bear’s Son Luther,  3  Red Fish. Sioux.

Format: Photographic Print, B&W
Repository: Dickinson College Archives & Special Collections
Standing Bear, Red Fish and five students [version 1], c.1884

Studio portrait of visiting chiefs Standing Bear and Red Fish with three male students and two female students. The male students are probably Luther Standing Bear, Willard Standing Bear, and Henry Standing Bear. One of the female students is probably Victoria Standing Bear.  

Format: Glass Plate Negative
Repository: National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Standing Bear, Red Fish and five students [version 2], c.1884

Studio portrait of visiting chiefs Standing Bear and Red Fish with three male students and two female students. The male students are probably Luther Standing Bear, Willard Standing Bear, and Henry Standing Bear. One of the female students is probably Victoria Standing Bear.

Format: Photographic Print, B&W
Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
Teacher Mary Hyde and Indian School choir [version 1], 1884

Studio portrait of instructor Mary Hyde and the Indian School choir, including male and female students in school uniforms.

Note: The Cumberland County Historical Society assigns a date of April 30, 1884 to their copy of this image. They also identified several students by comparison with...

Format: Glass Plate Negative
Repository: National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Teacher Mary Hyde and Indian School choir [version 2], 1884

Studio portrait of instructor Mary Hyde and the Indian School choir, including male and female students in school uniforms.

Note: The Cumberland County Historical Society assigns a date of April 30, 1884 to this image. They also identified several students by comparison with other images...

Format: Photographic Print, B&W
Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 2, No. 29)
February 25, 1887

The first page opened with a poem titled “New Every Morning,” followed by "An Indian Woman Fought For Her Husband After Receiving a Beating From Him" which concluded on the fourth page. Page two gave news from the Chemawa and Genoa Indian Schools, and "A Nice Pocket Book for the Best," asking...

Repository: Dickinson College Archives & Special Collections
The Indian Helper (Vol. 2, No. 37)
April 22, 1887

This issue opened with a poem titled “Kindness” followed by a reprint from the Word Carrier, “Manners” that compared ill-mannered behavior to animal traits and was intended as a lesson to Carlisle students. Also on that page was a paragraph reprinted from the Genoa Indian School...

Repository: Dickinson College Archives & Special Collections
The Indian Helper (Vol. 3, No. 3)
August 26, 1887

The first page continued Marianna Burgess' report of conditions at the Rosebud and Pine Ridge Sioux Agencies begun in Volume 2, including her visit to Luther Standing Bear's home. Page two reported a visit to the school by some deaf school principals who "much interested our boys with their...

Repository: Dickinson College Archives & Special Collections
The School News (Vol. 1, No. 10)
March 1881

It opens with the conclusion to Roman Nose’s long journey to Carlisle. He explained how at Lee he learned to mow with a scythe and milk cows, before travelling to Carlisle Barracks, where he was happy to see other Indians following the “white man’s way”. Also on the first page is a small bit...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society

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