Pueblo

Primary tabs

Displaying 776 - 800 of 858 records
The Indian Helper (Vol. 2, No. 51)
July 29, 1887

This issue opened with a poem titled “THROUGH AND THROUGH” reprinted from Scattered Seeds.” Also found on that page was “MISS WILSON’S ACCOUNT OF HER TRIP TO SCOTLAND,” a travelogue of the teacher and her sister’s visit by ocean liner to Scotland and Ireland and back. Page two opened...

Repository: Dickinson College Archives & Special Collections
The Indian Helper (Vol. 3, No. 16)
November 25, 1887

The first page opened with a poem, "Thanksgiving Turkey," a play on the letters in the word "Turkey" followed by a description of the Acoma Pueblo by student Annie Thomas, entitled "A Queer Place To Live." This also was a subject of the article written about the monthly exhibition on page 3. The...

Repository: Dickinson College Archives & Special Collections
The Indian Helper (Vol. 3, No. 33)
March 30, 1888

The first page opened with the poem, " A Proverb," followed by Jemima Wheelock's (Oneida) report of "Our Wilmington Trip," about a group of students traveling to Delaware where they stayed with families before they headed to Philadelphia with Capt. Pratt and Miss Leverett.  They visited John...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 3, No. 47)
July 6, 1888

The first page opened with a poem by Sarah E. Eastman reprinted from “Golden Days,” titled “If! If!” followed by the reprinted letter from a Carlisle Indian School student on Outing called “She Wants a Higher Education.” The last piece on the page continues on the fourth page called “A Modern...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 4, No. 1)
August 17, 1888

The first page opened with the poem, “What the Flowers Said,” followed by an article reprinted from The Baltimorean, titled "Men Who Were Laughed At,” about how technologies were first spurned. Page two featured several news reports about the band, outing experiences, news from the...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 4, No. 24)
February 1, 1889

The first page began with an untitled poem that opened with the first line “We can never be too careful,” followed by “Which Would You Rather Be a Spider or a Fly? / The White Man Like a Spider,” an account of Mr. Seger’s description of the idiosyncrasies of language translation. It continued on...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 4, No. 33)
April 5, 1889

The first page began with a poem titled, “The Tongue,” followed by the Man-on-the-band-stand’s discussion in “Never Before,” that explained that a horde of boys would be marching east toward opportunity but a horde of boys would be marching west toward degradation, which he described as “evil...

Repository: Dickinson College Archives & Special Collections
The Indian Helper (Vol. 4, No. 34)
April 12, 1889

The first page began with a poem titled, “Dr. Nature’s Prescription,” followed by “How One of the Printer Boys Came Out Ahead,” which described how a printer, against the advice of his instructor, was able to repair faulty equipment using his own problem solving technique. This was followed by a...

Repository: Dickinson College Archives & Special Collections
The Indian Helper (Vol. 4, No. 38)
May 10, 1889

The first page began with an untitled poem with a first line of “God gave us hands – one left one right,” followed by an article describing the seeds of success titled “When It Tells.” The next article was about the Ayan Indians who fish salmon on the Yukon River titled “Sharp-sighted Indians,”...

Repository: Dickinson College Archives & Special Collections
The Indian Helper (Vol. 4, No. 42)
June 7, 1889

The first page opened with a poem by Susan Coolidge titled “New Every Morning,” followed by a letter from Ernie Black (Cheyenne) titled “News from our Cheyenne and Arapahoe Boys.” Also on the page was a reprint from The Sunday School Times titled “We Must Be Run Through a Mill.” Page...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 4, No. 44)
June 21, 1889

The first page opened with a poem by Fannie Bolton titled “It is Time,” followed by “The Experience of a Bull: A Child’s Version of the Recent Flood at Lewistown,” followed by “A Busy Indian Boy in the Country” which was Wallace Scott’s (Pueblo) description of his farm experience in Bucks County...

Repository: Dickinson College Archives & Special Collections
The Indian Helper (Vol. 5, No. 18)
December 20, 1889

The first page opened with a poem titled "A Christmas Carol by Eleanor W.F. Bates in Home Magazine. Next came a new installment of the series titled “How An Indian Girl Might Tell Her Own Story if She Had the Chance: Founded on Actual Observations of the Man-on-the-band-stand’s Chief...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Morning Star (Vol. 4, No. 5)
December 1883

Page one opened with an article titled “Strong Words for the Indians From Commissioner Price”, along with “A Plea for Civilized Indians”, “Two Pueblo Boys”, and “The Baby”. Page two had Captain Pratt’s account of his visit to the west. It also had comments from various chiefs on their opinion on...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Morning Star (Vol. 4, No. 7)
February 1884

Page one opened with Proverb 11:23. Also on he page was “Educating The Indians”, and a Pueblo legend as told by a Pueblo student. Page two had story about a foolish farmer, as well as an important letter from an Indian Agent, and a piece on a conference at Lake Mohonk.

Page three had the...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Morning Star (Vol. 5, No. 4)
October & November 1884

Page one had a poem titled “Lady Yeardley’s Guest” by Margaret Preston, followed by a report of the commissioner of Indian Affairs, which continued onto page two, and then onto page three, where it ended.

After the finish of the report, page three had articles titled “The Up-Thrust of...

Repository: Dickinson College Archives & Special Collections
The Morning Star (Vol. 5, No. 6)
January 1885

Page one opened with an extract from Hon. Byron M. Cutcheon speech, “Our Indian Policy,” originally given to the House of Representatives. Following that was “Secretary Teller in Favor of Schools.” Page two had a list of Bills and Resolutions relating to Indians that went before congress...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Red Man (Vol. 8, No. 9)
May 1916

The legend of Queen Allaquippa is presented.  A series of resolutions on the Seminoles, made by the Tampa Woman's Club, support the Seminole people's attempts to regain land in Florida.  Lace making among the Pueblo Nation is discussed.  An article from the New York Evening Post about...

Repository: Dickinson College Archives & Special Collections
The School News (Vol. 1, No. 11)
April 1881

The opening article was written by Michael Burns (Apache), and focused on “The Indian Question.” In it he explains how many Indians falsely believe that white men are wiser simply because they are born white, and argues that their wisdom comes not from their skin color, but from more easily...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The School News (Vol. 1, No. 12)
May 1881

Number 12. Opened with a letter from Charles Kauboodle (Kiowa) to his cousin Laura, talking about what they’ve learned in school, their family, and wishing her a quick recovery from the sickness she has. Jessa Bent also had a few sentences on the desert published at the bottom of the page. The...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The School News (Vol. 2, No. 3)
August 1881

The August edition opens with an Article on the need to be useful the Carlisle Children feel, and how badly the writer felt when unable to work while sick. It continued onto page four. Page two brings Samuel Townsend (Pawnee) stepping down as editor with Charles Kihega (Iowa) taking his place....

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The School News (Vol. 2, No. 4)
September 1881

The first page is has a small narrative from Nellie Carey (Apache) on her visit to the Navajoes with her white family, She describes the Navajoes as dirty, explaining how they don’t keep their tents clean. There was also a letter from Davis Cheyenne (Cheyenne) to Captain Pratt about his time in...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The School News (Vol. 2, No. 6)
November 1881

The first page talked about the cost of educating an Indian vs the cost of killing one to support the Indian Schools. The article was titled “The Amount it Takes to Kill One Indian Would Establish Many School Like Carlisle and Hampton” by Michael Burns (Apache). The second page has an article...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The School News (Vol. 3, No. 1)
June 1882

On the first page Justine A. LaFromboise describes her trip to Carlisle, explaining how her father convinced her to go get an education. The story continues onto page four. On page two Ellis B. Childers (Creek) explained that he will be the editor while Charles Kihega (Iowa) visits home. C....

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The School News (Vol. 3, No. 3)
August 1882

On page one the paper’s editor, Charles Kihega (Iowa) wrote a letter about his successful journey home. Metopah (Osage), Taylor Ealy (Pueblo), and Frank Everett (Wichita) also wrote letters from home back to the school. On page two eight boys and twelve girls took a trip to explore Luray Cave....

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The School News (Vol. 3, No. 9)
February 1883

The first page had a story told to Joshua Given (Kiowa) by his grandparents about a young girl who never touched the ground and one day chased a star into the sky. It also included a letter from Louis Big Horse (Osage) to his father in which he discussed planting fruit. Page two had an article...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society

Pages

Subscribe to Pueblo