Cheyenne

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Stanley Lamewoman Student Information Card

Student information card of Stanley Lamewoman (here Lame Woman), a member of the Cheyenne Nation, who entered the school on February 28, 1907 and departed on March 22, 1907.

Repository: National Archives and Records Administration
Stanley Little Whiteman (Grey Skunk) Student File

Student file of Stanley Little Whiteman (Grey Skunk), a member of the Cheyenne Nation, who entered the school on January 24, 1907 and departed on March 29, 1909. The file contains a student information card, a progress/conduct card, a former student response postcard, an application for...

Repository: National Archives and Records Administration
Stanley Little Whiteman Student Information Card

Student information card of Stanley Little Whiteman, a member of the Cheyenne Nation, who entered the school on January 24, 1907 and departed on March 29, 1909. The file indicates Little Whiteman was living in Lame Deer, Montana in 1913.

Repository: National Archives and Records Administration
Stanton (Long Back) Student File

Student file of Stanton (Long Back), a member of the Cheyenne Nation, who entered the school on February 3, 1881 and departed on June 17, 1884. The file contains a student information card.

Repository: National Archives and Records Administration
Stanton (Long Back) Student Information Card

Student information card of Stanton (Long Back), a member of the Cheyenne Nation, who entered the school on February 3, 1881 and departed on June 17, 1884.

Repository: National Archives and Records Administration
Students and staff in the harness-making shop, c.1880

Students and staff working in the harness-making shop at the Carlisle Indian School. They are identified as, from left to right: Lorenzo Chapman (instructor), Geoffrey Chips, Cheape Ross, Curtis, Lawrence, Edward Little, William Spotted Tail, Julian, Morgan, Henry Thigh, and Andrew. 

Format: Photographic Print, B&W
Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
Sumner Riggs (Red Hat) Student File

Student file of Sumner Riggs (Red Hat), a member of the Cheyenne Nation, who entered the school on September 6, 1880, and departed on December 4, 1884.  The file contains a student information card, correspondence, former student response postcards, a returned student survey, and a report after...

Repository: National Archives and Records Administration
Sumner Riggs Student Information Card

Student information card of Sumner (here Summer) Riggs, a member of the Cheyenne Nation, who entered the school on September 6, 1880 and departed on December 4, 1884. The file indicates Riggs was living in Fay, Oklahoma in 1913.

Repository: National Archives and Records Administration
Tawkeny Hail Student Information Card

Student information card of Tawkeny Hail, a member of the Cheyenne Nation, who entered the school on September 15, 1889 and departed on July 28, 1890.

Repository: National Archives and Records Administration
Tawkeny Hail Student Information Card

Student information card of Tawkeny Hail, a member of the Cheyenne Nation, who entered the school on September 15, 1889 and departed on July 28, 1890.

Repository: National Archives and Records Administration
Ten male Cheyenne students [version 1], 1880

Studio portrait of ten unidentified male students wearing school uniforms. 

The caption for the Cumberland County Historical Society's copy of this image identifies them as from the Cheyenne nation and dates it to March 1880. 

Format: Glass Plate Negative
Repository: National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Ten male Cheyenne students [version 2], 1880

Studio portratit of ten unidentified male students in school uniforms. The caption identifies them as being from the Cheyenne nation and provides a date of March 1880. 

Format: Photographic Print, B&W
Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
Ten male student printers [version 1], c.1885

Studio portrait of ten male students in uniform. 

The Cumberland County Historical Society's copy of this image identifies them as "Printer Boys." On one copy of the image they are identified as, left to right: William Butcher, Benajah Miles, Paul Boynton, Richard Davis, Samuel Townsend,...

Format: Glass Plate Negative
Repository: National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Ten male student printers [version 2], c.1885

Studio portrait of ten male students in uniform, identified as being "Printer Boys." On one copy of the image they are identified as, left to right: William Butcher, Benajah Miles, Paul Boynton, Richard Davis, Samuel Townsend, Cyrus Fell Star, Chester Cornelius, Benjamin Thomas, Henry North, and...

Format: Photographic Print, B&W
Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
Thaddeus Redwater (Bull Owl) Student File

Student file of Thaddeus Redwater (Bull Owl, Mah-i-o), a member of the Cheyenne Nation, who entered the school on January 18, 1896, and departed on December 18, 1900.  The file contains a student information card, a position card, a newspaper clipping, correspondence, a returned student survey,...

Repository: National Archives and Records Administration
Thaddeus Redwater Student Information Card

Student information card of Thaddeus Redwater (here Red Water), a member of the Cheyenne Nation, who entered the school on January 18, 1896 and departed on December 18, 1900. The file indicates Redwater was living in Lame Deer, Montana in 1913.

Repository: National Archives and Records Administration
The Indian Helper (Vol. 1, No. 16)
November 27, 1885

The first page opened with a poem titled “Snow Brings Fun,” followed by instructions for “How to Write to Your Mother,” directed to a young man with instructions for how to reply to his mother who was pleading for his return back to his home agency. Page two opened with a series of news items...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 2, No. 28)
February 18, 1887

The first page opened with the poem, "You Conquer Me, Me Conquer You" followed by a letter from Rev. Edward F. Wilson of the Shingwauk Home titled "An Indian School in Canada," which described Wilson’s report to the Indian Department of Canada on his visit to Carlisle, the Lincoln Institute and...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 2, No. 29)
February 25, 1887

The first page opened with a poem titled “New Every Morning,” followed by "An Indian Woman Fought For Her Husband After Receiving a Beating From Him" which concluded on the fourth page. Page two gave news from the Chemawa and Genoa Indian Schools, and "A Nice Pocket Book for the Best," asking...

Repository: Dickinson College Archives & Special Collections
The Indian Helper (Vol. 2, No. 42)
May 27, 1887

The first page opened with the poem "Take Care" followed by "A Visitor at Carlisle" which provided the opportunity to present arguments for Indian education away from the reservations. It continued on page four. Page two opened with an account of a presentation by "Dr. Harmon and Col. Thomas," a...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 2, No. 45)
June 17, 1887

This issue opened with a poem titled “A CLUSTER OF NEVERS,” from Selected, followed by a fictionalized conversation between two boys traveling to their homes in the west from Carlisle titled “TWO BOYS TALK IN THE CARS ON THEIR WAY HOME: WHAT THEY MAY HAVE SAID.” In the conversation, “...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 2, No. 47)
July 1, 1887

This issue opened with a poem titled “CLASS OF INDIAN BOYS,” written by a Quaker farm wife about a group of Outing students. The next article was titled “A TRIP” by Katie Grinrod (Wyandotte), which gave the account of her and Clara Cornelius’(Oneida) trip to Philadelphia with their Outing family...

Repository: Dickinson College Archives & Special Collections
The Indian Helper (Vol. 4, No. 24)
February 1, 1889

The first page began with an untitled poem that opened with the first line “We can never be too careful,” followed by “Which Would You Rather Be a Spider or a Fly? / The White Man Like a Spider,” an account of Mr. Seger’s description of the idiosyncrasies of language translation. It continued on...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 4, No. 31)
March 22, 1889

The first page began with a poem titled, “True Heroism,” followed by a fictional conversation among two Indian School students, Tom and Phil as reported by the Man-On-The-Band-Stand. In the moralizing story, continued on the fourth page, Phil sets a good example by keeping the Outing System...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 4, No. 40)
May 24, 1889

The first page began with a poem titled “My Kingdom,” followed by a story told by the Man-on-the-band-stand called “An Indian Boy in Ohio Whispers His Story of a Hard Row on the River.” The story described how an Indian student survived a dangerous storm in a boat with his companions. Page two...

Repository: Dickinson College Archives & Special Collections

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