Girls Literary Society (Endeavor Society)

Primary tabs

Displaying 1 - 14 of 14 records
The Indian Helper (Vol. 1, No. 14)
November 13, 1885

The first page opened with a poem titled "Found in the Path," followed by an article called "Are You His Equal?" that described an incident in which the Man-on-the-Band-Stand corrected a Carlisle student's letter home because it contained disparaging language toward those with darker skin. There...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 1, No. 19)
December 18, 1885

The first page opened with a poem titled “For the Boys,” followed by a description of “Loafing” observed by the Man-on-the-band-stand among the boys on campus. There was also a feature, “200,000,000 that tallied up the time it would take to become as rich as Mr. Vanderbilt. Page two reported...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 1, No. 27)
February 12, 1886

The first page opened with a poem titled "Content," followed by "He Suffered Because He Could Not Speak English," an article about a Kiowa boy who was accused of a crime and could not defend himself. The next article was a treatise on the importance of buying insurance. Page two began with a...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 1, No. 30)
March 5, 1886

The first page opened with a poem titled "Exhibition Night: By The-Man-on-the-Band-Stand's Wife." There were also several brief articles about high winds in Philadelphia, heavy snows in Quebec, the fate of a ship that ran aground during a voyage between Boston and Liverpool, a birthday party for...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 1, No. 35)
April 9, 1886

The first page opened with a poem titled "Spring,” followed by "How a Pawnee Got Ahead of a Cheyenne Chief: A Story as told by one of our Boys," in which a U.S. congressman’s position was chastised using an analogy of a Cheyenne-Pawnee skirmish. There is also a blurb about temperance on this...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 2, No. 14)
November 12, 1886

The first page opened with a poem titled "A Fourteen-Year-Old Girl's Good Advice," followed by an article called "The Menomonees and Pottawatomies Dance: A Story by Lucy Jordan, Stockbridge, a pupil from Wisconsin," that told of an 1882 visit by dancers to her home agency in Keshena, Wisconsin....

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 3, No. 17)
December 2, 1887

The first page opened with a poem, "Do the Right, Boys," followed by  a letter from Richard Yellow Robe, entitled "An Indian Boy's Experience: Written by Himself as a Composition and Read at our last Month's Exhibition" about his escape from the battle in which Custer was killed and his...

Repository: Dickinson College Archives & Special Collections
The Indian Helper (Vol. 3, No. 19)
December 16, 1887

The first page opened with an untitled poem about kindness, followed by "Part of Our Hospital Work," a reprint of a composition by Nancy Cornelius (Oneida) who detailed her experiences as a hospital assistant. She wrote about the breakfast routine and the Apache mothers caring for their babies...

Repository: Dickinson College Archives & Special Collections
The Indian Helper (Vol. 3, No. 25)
February 3, 1888

The first page opened with a poem, "The Boys We Need," reprinted from "Golden Days;" followed by a fictitious fable of two Carlisle students, "The Longest Way Round," warning against taking shortcuts. The page also included two blurbs about the blizzard in the West. Page two opened with a...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 4, No. 12)
November 2, 1888

The first page opened with the poem, “Little Helpers,” reprinted from the Sunday School Times. Next came a piece titled “Environment,” the answer to the previously posted word story, followed by “No Time to Read?” about the importance of reading which continued on the fourth page. Page...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 4, No. 25)
February 8, 1889

The first page began with a poem titled “Do Your Best,” followed by “The Man-On-the-Band-Stand and a Stranger,” which described the “old gentleman’s” effort to thwart the hiring of an Outing student who was careless with arithmetic. It continued on page four. Page two began with “A Manly...

Repository: Dickinson College Archives & Special Collections
The Indian Helper (Vol. 5, No. 12)
November 8, 1889

The first page opened with a poem by E.G. titled "U.S.I.D.” followed by the next installment of the series titled “How An Indian Girl Might Tell Her Own Story if She Had the Chance: Founded on Actual Observations of the Man-on-the-band-stand’s Chief Clerk” (continued from the previous week). The...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 5, No. 7)
October 4, 1889

The first page opened with a poem "Bear It in Mind” followed by the third installment of the series titled “How An Indian Girl Might Tell Her Own Story if She Had the Chance: All Founded on Actual Observations of the Man-on-the-band-stand’s Chief Clerk” which continued on the fourth page. Page...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 5, No. 8)
October 11, 1889

The first page opened with a poem by Bayard Taylor with the first line "Learn to live, and live to learn” followed by the fourth installment of the series titled “How An Indian Girl Might Tell Her Own Story if She Had the Chance: All Founded on Actual Observations of the Man-on-the-band-stand’s...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
Subscribe to Girls Literary Society (Endeavor Society)