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The Indian Helper (Vol. 4, No. 39)
May 17, 1889

The first page began with a poem titled “Listen,” reprinted from Harper’s Bazaar, followed by the publication of a letter received from Dolly Gould (Nez Perce) on her work at the Ft. Lapwai School under the title “Appreciation.” Felix Iron Eagle Feather’s (Sioux) letter from his Outing...

Repository: Dickinson College Archives & Special Collections
The Indian Helper (Vol. 4, No. 43)
June 14, 1889

The first page opened with a poem "Wanted,” followed by a fictitious conversation titled “Sallie Lump-of-Mud and Little Miss Sensible Have a Talk.” The page ended with news from Harriet Elder (Nez Perce) and her agency, titled “This Was My Name When at School – Harriet M. Elder.” Page two...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 4, No. 6)
September 21, 1888

The first page opened with an untitled poem by J. W. Burgess reprinted from Sunshine, followed by “Our Walnut Tree” about the Man-On-the-Band-Stand’s efforts to keep students from picking green walnuts. The second page began with “The Captain,” which described the speech Capt. Pratt...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 5, No. 14)
November 22, 1889

The first page opened with a poem by E.G. titled "After Carlisle, What?” followed by the next installment of the series titled “How An Indian Girl Might Tell Her Own Story if She Had the Chance: Founded on Actual Observations of the Man-on-the-band-stand’s Chief Clerk” (continued from the...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 5, No. 5)
September 20, 1889

The first page opened with a poem "The Singer’s Alms: An Incident in the Life of the Great Tenor, Mario” by Henry Abbey, followed by the first installment in a series of articles written by the Man-on-the-Band-Stand about a Pueblo girl named Mollie. These stories were later published in book...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 5, No. 8)
October 11, 1889

The first page opened with a poem by Bayard Taylor with the first line "Learn to live, and live to learn” followed by the fourth installment of the series titled “How An Indian Girl Might Tell Her Own Story if She Had the Chance: All Founded on Actual Observations of the Man-on-the-band-stand’s...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Morning Star (Vol. 3, No. 12)
July 1883

Page one is dominated by small vignettes of various day-to-day events that happened at the school, including compliments on students works, stories of gifted flowers and visiting agents. Page two has the beginning of an article titled “A Visit to the Indian Territory – Our Returned Pupils” which...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Morning Star (Vol. 4, No. 1)
August 1883

Page one opens with a letter from the Secretary of the Interior, H.M. Teller, about the education of Indians. Page two had the Address Captain Pratt gave at the National Educational Convention at Ocean Grove, NJ. This address continued on to page three. After the end of Captain Pratt’s address,...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Morning Star (Vol. 4, No. 5)
December 1883

Page one opened with an article titled “Strong Words for the Indians From Commissioner Price”, along with “A Plea for Civilized Indians”, “Two Pueblo Boys”, and “The Baby”. Page two had Captain Pratt’s account of his visit to the west. It also had comments from various chiefs on their opinion on...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Morning Star (Vol. 4, No. 9)
April 1884

Page one had the speech Cap. Pratt gave at the National Convention of Superintendents of Education at Washington, D.C. He talked about how the solution to the “Indian Problem” was to give them all an education. Page two had an article on the relationship between the government and the Indian...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Morning Star (Vol. 5, No. 1)
August 1884

Page one opened with a poem on the Sioux, followed by a report on the “Present Aspects of the Indian Problem”. Page two asked “Who is responsible” for civilizing Indians as well as a small piece on an Australian who visited to learn about the Indians.

Page three had a continuation of the...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Morning Star (Vol. 5, No. 2)
September 1884

Page one started with a comparison photo of Mary Perry, John Menaul, and Bennie Thomas taken upon arrival at the school, and then one year later at their departure. Following the picture was the annual report, which was continued on page four. Page two suggested integrating Indian children into...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Morning Star (Vol. 5, No. 5)
December 1884

Page one started with a poem titled “The Indian’s Plea” by A.F.W., followed by a report on an organization made in 1822 to help get better rights for Indians. Included is their constitution and a list of the officers. This continued onto page two where the officer’s list was. Then there was an...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Morning Star (Vol. 5, No. 6)
January 1885

Page one opened with an extract from Hon. Byron M. Cutcheon speech, “Our Indian Policy,” originally given to the House of Representatives. Following that was “Secretary Teller in Favor of Schools.” Page two had a list of Bills and Resolutions relating to Indians that went before congress...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The School News (Vol. 2, No. 6)
November 1881

The first page talked about the cost of educating an Indian vs the cost of killing one to support the Indian Schools. The article was titled “The Amount it Takes to Kill One Indian Would Establish Many School Like Carlisle and Hampton” by Michael Burns (Apache). The second page has an article...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The School News (Vol. 3, No. 10)
March 1883

Page one included an address to the students from Capt. Daniel Childers, written by E. B. Childers, in which he described his own childhood and assured the students of the great opportunities they have as a result of attending Carlisle. Students were also reminded that chewing and smoking...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The School News (Vol. 3, No. 12)
May 1883

Page one reprinted Van Horn's letter to friend, in which he described his train ride into Trenton, New Jersey, and a drunken old man who disturbed him on the ride.  Howard Chawhip also retold a story of an old drunkard who only went to church to hear the singing, but later became a good man...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The School News (Vol. 3, No. 7)
December 1882

Page one featured Henry North's article about his outing during the summer in Lancaster County. North described his daily routine and explained what he learned. Page two had a piece about Christmas, in which all the students gathered in the chapel to meet with St. Nick. On the same page Calvin...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The School News (Vol. 3, No. 8)
January 1883

Page one was entirely taken up by a letter from Summer Riggs (Cheyenne), in which he discussed visiting friends and how a white man wanted to learn his actual name, Marchewa, in his native language. Page two mentioned issues that some Congressmen have with rules and conditions students at the...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
Request for Funds for Industrial Training
March 8, 1880

Richard Henry Pratt requests funds to develop the industrial and mechanical training programs at the school. Specifically, Pratt hopes to establish a harness-making program and to expand the blacksmithing, wagon-making, carpentry, shoemaking, and tinsmithing departments. Pratt notes that this...

Format: Letters/Correspondence
Repository: National Archives and Records Administration
Idea to Establish an Indian School in Gettysburg
March 9, 1880

Andrew J. Koser informs the Secretary of the Interior that he visited the Carlisle Indian School, which he thinks is a "noble move toward civilization" and more effective than reservation schools. He proposes the idea of purchasing the building formerly housing the Orphans Home in Gettysburg to...

Format: Letters/Correspondence
Repository: National Archives and Records Administration
Pratt's Ability to Personally Recruit Students in New Mexico and Colorado
April 2, 1880

Richard Henry Pratt references the detail of Lieutenant Brown and informs the Commissioner of Indian Affairs that he can recruit students from New Mexico and Colorado in person after the Dakota Chiefs visit the Carlisle Indian School.

Note: This item was copied from U.S. National Archives...

Format: Letters/Correspondence
Repository: National Archives and Records Administration
Desire to Start Indian School in Gettysburg
April 19, 1880 - April 21, 1880

A. J. Koser informs Representative J. C. Beltzhoover that he visited the Carlisle Indian School and liked it so much that he'd like to establish an Indian school for 140 students in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania at a former Soldiers Homestead. Beltzhoover forwards Roses' letter to the Commissioner of...

Format: Letters/Correspondence
Repository: National Archives and Records Administration
Request for Friends of the School to Visit when Chiefs Do
April 24, 1880

Richard Henry Pratt asks Commissioner of Indian Affairs R. E. Trowbridge to set the date when chiefs visit the Carlisle Indian School so that "friends of the school" can visit at the same time.

Note: This item was copied from U.S. National Archives microfilm reels (M234), which were...

Format: Letters/Correspondence
Repository: National Archives and Records Administration
Plan to Establish Indian School in Gettysburg
April 27, 1880

Andrew J. Koser informs Commissioner of Indian Affairs R. E. Trowbridge that he visited the Carlisle Indian School, which he thinks is a "grand success" and more effective than reservation schools. He proposes the idea of purchasing the building formerly housing the Soldiers and Orphans...

Format: Letters/Correspondence
Repository: National Archives and Records Administration

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