Buildings and Grounds

Displaying 26 - 50 of 209 records
The Indian Helper (Vol. 3, No. 17)
December 2, 1887

The first page opened with a poem, "Do the Right, Boys," followed by  a letter from Richard Yellow Robe, entitled "An Indian Boy's Experience: Written by Himself as a Composition and Read at our last Month's Exhibition" about his escape from the battle in which Custer was killed and his subsequent enrollment in the Carlisle Indian School. Page…

Format:
Newspapers
Repository:
Dickinson College Archives & Special Collections
The Indian Helper (Vol. 3, No. 20)
December 23, 1887

The first page opened with a two poems, "Christmas Eve," and "Christmas," about the true meaning of Christmas. Next came a story about a monkey who developed an intolerance to whiskey, entitled "A Temperance Monkey," which was continued on the fourth page. Page two opened with a report about the monthly exhibition followed by news that the boys…

Format:
Newspapers
Repository:
Dickinson College Archives & Special Collections
The Indian Helper (Vol. 3, No. 22)
January 13, 1888

The first page opened with a poem, "How To Be Happy" followed by a reprint of a letter to the school from J. H. Seger of the Cheyenne and Arapahoe Agency dated Jan 4, 1888 that mentioned several students who returned to the Agency. Page two gave a humorous offering by Nellie Carey (Apache) from "her new place in the country," advice for the…

Format:
Newspapers
Repository:
Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 3, No. 24)
January 27, 1888

The first page opened with a poem, "Dare," followed by a story, "Engines and Boys," that reported the arrival by train of the new fire engine called "Uncle Sam." Then came a piece entitled, "Be Neat," on the importance of being neat and orderly. It continued on page four. Page two reported the experience of the four girls who visited the White…

Format:
Newspapers
Repository:
Dickinson College Archives & Special Collections
The Indian Helper (Vol. 3, No. 35)
April 13, 1888

The first page opened with a poem, "Boy and Man," followed by "Two Carlisle Indian  Boys Stop Under the Walnut Tree, and Talk," contrasting an honest, hard working boy to a lazy, ungrateful boy. It continued on the fourth page. Page two featured news and greetings from returned students, an article "School Room Sentences," that encouraged using…

Format:
Newspapers
Repository:
Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 3, No. 42)
June 1, 1888

The first page opened with a poem, "The Old Steam Mill," followed by a fictitious conversation between two Carlisle Indian School students, Tom and Ben discussing the merits of work and study. It continued on page four. Page two included news from Pine Ridge Agency, and of the Standing family’s trip to Liverpool, the value of repeating unknown…

Nation:
Format:
Newspapers
Repository:
Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 3, No. 44)
June 15, 1888

The first page opened with an untitled poem, followed by “A Letter from Mr. Standing: How He Finds Things in England,” a travel diary of the Standing Family’s visit to England. Page two included a report of “An Aged Friend,” and news about visits Dr. Given made to Outing students in Bucks County. It also reported a Department of Interior…

Format:
Newspapers
Repository:
Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 3, No. 45)
June 22, 1888

The first page opened with a poem “Selected by Susan Longstreth,” titled “To My Dog ‘Blanco’” by J.G. Holland. The other feature on the first page was an account of “An Indian Girl on a Farm: She Enjoys a Holiday,” that described Adelia Lowe (Sioux) and Frances King’s (Quapaw) trip to Burlington, New Jersey, which continued on the fourth page.…

Format:
Newspapers
Repository:
Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 3, No. 47)
July 6, 1888

The first page opened with a poem by Sarah E. Eastman reprinted from “Golden Days,” titled “If! If!” followed by the reprinted letter from a Carlisle Indian School student on Outing called “She Wants a Higher Education.” The last piece on the page continues on the fourth page called “A Modern Pueblo” about the process by which a progressive…

Nation:
Format:
Newspapers
Repository:
Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 3, No. 49)
July 20, 1888

The first page opened with the poem “Be True” followed by an article titled “A Carlisle Teacher on the Big Ocean,” about a trip aboard the Steamer Aurania dated July 6th, 1888 written for the Man-on-the-band-stand by “A Carlisler,” aka Miss Lowe. The article concluded on the fourth page. Page two featured a variety of small newsy paragraphs…

Nation:
Format:
Newspapers
Repository:
Dickinson College Archives & Special Collections
The Indian Helper (Vol. 3, No. 51)
August 3, 1888

The first page opened with an untitled selection, opening with the line, “A Man of kindness to his beast is kind,” followed by “A Day In London,” dated July 12, 1888, signed by “A Carlisler,” who is later revealed to be Miss Lowe, and continued on to the fourth page.  The report included a visit to St. Paul’s Cathedral, Westminster Abbey,…

Format:
Newspapers
Repository:
Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 3, No. 52)
August 10, 1888

The first page opened with the poem, “What Makes A Man,” followed by an article titled, “Interesting Observations At the Indians’ Own Home” reprinting a letter from Joshua Given (Kiowa) who described the social and political news from the Kiowa and Comanche Agency. He reported the activities of students who had returned home from Carlisle. The…

Nation:
Format:
Newspapers
Repository:
Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 4, No. 1)
August 17, 1888

The first page opened with the poem, “What the Flowers Said,” followed by an article reprinted from The Baltimorean, titled "Men Who Were Laughed At,” about how technologies were first spurned. Page two featured several news reports about the band, outing experiences, news from the Rosebud Sioux and Osage Agencies, and an entire column…

Nation:
Format:
Newspapers
Repository:
Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 4, No. 3)
August 31, 1888

The first page opened with a poem, “Good Advice,” followed by a fictional account of a conversation titled “Two Carlisle Boys at Pine Ridge Talk Over the Sioux Bill,” in which two former students, Zack and Tim, discuss the merits of signing the Severalty Act which had been presented to the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe. It concluded on the fourth…

Nation:
Format:
Newspapers
Repository:
Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 4, No. 4)
September 7, 1888

The first page opened with a poem, “Grasp the Nettle,” followed by a reprinted letter to Superintendent Pratt from Conrad Roubideaux (Sioux) titled “Conrad Didn’t Give Up the Ship,” in which he described the hardships of finding work on the reservation. Page two included news that Pratt was out West soliciting signatures for the Severalty Bill…

Format:
Newspapers
Repository:
Private Collection
The Indian Helper (Vol. 4, No. 9)
October 12, 1888

The first page opened with an untitled poem, with the first line “God Wants the Boys,” followed by anonymous advice “Be Inventive.” Next came two columns, “Girls Read This,” an exercise for good posture and “Boys Read This,” an exercise for good behavior. The news items on page two gave reports about Charley Wolf and Jesse Paul, Nez Perce…

Nation:
Format:
Newspapers
Repository:
Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 4, No. 11)
October 26, 1888

The first page opens with an untitled poem. The next article titled “Peter Powlass,” contains a letter with news about events at the Oneida, Wisconsin Reservation written by former student, Peter Powlass. It is followed by “U.S. Congress,” that reported the schedule of the Fiftieth Congress. Page two contains news from the YMCA, the boys’…

Format:
Newspapers
Repository:
Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 4, No. 12)
November 2, 1888

The first page opened with the poem, “Little Helpers,” reprinted from the Sunday School Times. Next came a piece titled “Environment,” the answer to the previously posted word story, followed by “No Time to Read?” about the importance of reading which continued on the fourth page. Page two reported a talk by Rev. Mr. Wilson about the…

Format:
Newspapers
Repository:
Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 4, No. 13)
November 9, 1888

The first page opened with an untitled poem that bore the first line, “No human life ere dawned on earth.” Then came an article titled “Judge Wright’s Talk,” that excerpted J.V. Wright’s discourse on the importance of the Indian students’ perseverance and the success of the Coeur d’Alene and Chippewa nations. The talk continued on page four.…

Format:
Newspapers
Repository:
Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 4, No. 15)
November 23, 1888

The first page opened with a poem titled “IT PAYS," followed by a piece called "THANKSGIVING!" that reminded readers to be thankful. Next came "REV MR. WILSON EXPLAINS HIS 'MONKEY ADDRESS,'" which was a letter to the Editor from Edward Wilson from Darlington, Indian Territory dated Nov. 13, 1888. Page two began with "NOTES FROM OUR FRIDAY NIGHT…

Format:
Newspapers
Repository:
Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 4, No. 17)
December 7, 1888

This issue opened with a poem titled “HOW," by John Boyle O'Reilly, followed by news from a letter from Carlisle alumnus Samuel Townsend (Pawnee), a student at Marietta College. Page two included news items about Congress convening, Nancy Cornelius (Oneida) attending the Woman's National Indian Association, new arrivals, "Thanksgiving Echoes…

Nation:
Format:
Newspapers
Repository:
Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 4, No. 18)
December 14, 1888

The first page opened with a poem titled “How To Make Up,” followed by an article reprinted from The Sabbath School Visitor titled “Playthings of the Indian Children.” Next came a letter from Nancy Cornelius (Oneida) titled “Items of Interest From Nancy Cornelius,” which was sent from the Training School for Nurses at Hartford, Connecticut and…

Nation:
Format:
Newspapers
Repository:
Dickinson College Archives & Special Collections
The Indian Helper (Vol. 4, No. 20)
January 4, 1889

The first page opened with a poem titled “Look Up!” followed by a report that described, “Our Christmas?” and detailed the holiday events celebrated at the Indian School that included Santa Claus’ visit, who filled students’ hats and stockings with fruit, nuts and candy, and concluded with a description of a turkey dinner. Page two opened with…

Format:
Newspapers
Repository:
Dickinson College Archives & Special Collections
The Indian Helper (Vol. 4, No. 22)
January 18, 1889

The first page opened with a poem titled “Do We All?” followed by an article, “Do You Want to Get Rich?” about the value of saving little things. The next article, “Dr. Jackson at Our Missionary Meeting,” described the work of Sheldon Jackson among the Metlakahtla boys at the Sitka Industrial School in Alaska. It continued on the fourth page.…

Nation:
Format:
Newspapers
Repository:
Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 4, No. 24)
February 1, 1889

The first page began with an untitled poem that opened with the first line “We can never be too careful,” followed by “Which Would You Rather Be a Spider or a Fly? / The White Man Like a Spider,” an account of Mr. Seger’s description of the idiosyncrasies of language translation. It continued on the fourth page. Page two featured news articles…

Format:
Newspapers
Repository:
Cumberland County Historical Society