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The Indian Helper (Vol. 2, No. 14)
November 12, 1886

The first page opened with a poem titled "A Fourteen-Year-Old Girl's Good Advice," followed by an article called "The Menomonees and Pottawatomies Dance: A Story by Lucy Jordan, Stockbridge, a pupil from Wisconsin," that told of an 1882 visit by dancers to her home agency in Keshena, Wisconsin....

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 2, No. 29)
February 25, 1887

The first page opened with a poem titled “New Every Morning,” followed by "An Indian Woman Fought For Her Husband After Receiving a Beating From Him" which concluded on the fourth page. Page two gave news from the Chemawa and Genoa Indian Schools, and "A Nice Pocket Book for the Best," asking...

Repository: Dickinson College Archives & Special Collections
The Indian Helper (Vol. 2, No. 36)
April 15, 1887

This issue opened with a poem titled “THE HORSE’S PETITION,” followed by an alphabet poem titled “HOW TO GET RICH AND BECOME FAMOUS.” “TRUE COURAGE” offered a treatise on the rewards of kindness. Page two opened with news of a measles outbreak at the Ponca Agency, the influence of Carlisle...

Repository: Dickinson College Archives & Special Collections
The Indian Helper (Vol. 2, No. 37)
April 22, 1887

This issue opened with a poem titled “Kindness” followed by a reprint from the Word Carrier, “Manners” that compared ill-mannered behavior to animal traits and was intended as a lesson to Carlisle students. Also on that page was a paragraph reprinted from the Genoa Indian School...

Repository: Dickinson College Archives & Special Collections
The Indian Helper (Vol. 2, No. 41)
May 20, 1887

This issue opened with a poem titled “BE CAREFUL,” followed by an account of how “Aunt Martha” nearly drowned near the Genoa School in Nebraska titled “AN INDIAN GIRL SAVED THE LIFE OF A TEACHER,” followed by a reprint from The Indian Citizen that extolled the competence of Indian boys...

Repository: Dickinson College Archives & Special Collections
The Indian Helper (Vol. 2, No. 42)
May 27, 1887

The first page opened with the poem "Take Care" followed by "A Visitor at Carlisle" which provided the opportunity to present arguments for Indian education away from the reservations. It continued on page four. Page two opened with an account of a presentation by "Dr. Harmon and Col. Thomas," a...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 2, No. 43)
June 3, 1887

The first page opened with the poem "Strength For To-Day" followed by a piece called "Going Home!" The article gave a fictitious conversation between Carlisle students Allie and Fanny about the disadvantages of going home to the reservation because of the unsanitary conditions and practices...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 2, No. 47)
July 1, 1887

This issue opened with a poem titled “CLASS OF INDIAN BOYS,” written by a Quaker farm wife about a group of Outing students. The next article was titled “A TRIP” by Katie Grinrod (Wyandotte), which gave the account of her and Clara Cornelius’(Oneida) trip to Philadelphia with their Outing family...

Repository: Dickinson College Archives & Special Collections
The Indian Helper (Vol. 3, No. 11)
October 21, 1887

The first page began with the poem, "Nobility," by Alice Cary followed by "A Letter from a Dear Old Lady of Eighty Years of Age," who shared her childhood recollections of life among the Tuscarora Indians camped on her family's land in Canada, some of whom became her playmates. This letter was...

Repository: Dickinson College Archives & Special Collections
The Indian Helper (Vol. 3, No. 12)
October 28, 1887

This issue began with the poem, "Live for Something," followed by the continuation of the series begun in Number 8 entitled "Home Difficulties of a Young Indian Girl," about Fanny, a Carlisle alumnus struggling to apply her new-found skills to home life.  The second page featured news items...

Repository: Dickinson College Archives & Special Collections
The Indian Helper (Vol. 3, No. 14)
November 11, 1887

The first page featured a poem "Work While You Work" followed by "A Pawnee Medicine-Dance" which continued the story from number 14 told by Aunt Martha about Pawnee medicine men and their dances. The second page had news of returned students whose terms at Carlisle were completed, including...

Repository: Dickinson College Archives & Special Collections
The Indian Helper (Vol. 3, No. 18)
December 9, 1887

The first page opened with a short poem, "Grammar In Rhyme," followed by the memoir of Sioux student, Hope Red Bear about the Battle of the Big Horn, entitled "A Bit of Wild Life." There was also a piece about the treatment of horses called "If Horses Could Speak."  The second page featured news...

Repository: Dickinson College Archives & Special Collections
The Indian Helper (Vol. 3, No. 21)
January 6, 1888

The first page opened with a poem, "What Time Is It?" followed by the story of Indian women whose harvested cache of vegetables had been stolen. The story was titled, "How Some Indians Were Made to Suffer by Their Enemies: A True Story by a Dear, Kind Lady Who Lived For Many Years Among Them."...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 3, No. 24)
January 27, 1888

The first page opened with a poem, "Dare," followed by a story, "Engines and Boys," that reported the arrival by train of the new fire engine called "Uncle Sam." Then came a piece entitled, "Be Neat," on the importance of being neat and orderly. It continued on page four. Page two reported the...

Repository: Dickinson College Archives & Special Collections
The Indian Helper (Vol. 3, No. 26)
February 10, 1888

The first page opened with a poem, "Help One Another," reprinted from "Chambers, Journal;" followed by "7482 Feet High," a letter to the Man-on-the-Band-Stand from M. Burgess, about her journey to California. This page also began a letter from Peoria student Edith Abner, entitled "Visit to...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
February 24, 1888

The first page opened with a poem, "Sowing," followed by the article, "How the Letters Go," that described the process of express mail retrieval and distribution from trains. Then came a letter from former student John Dixon [Dickson] (Pueblo) who wrote about his experiences translating for and...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 3, No. 29)
March 2, 1888

The first page opened with a poem, "Beauty," followed by the article, "What Will Can Do," and "Extracts from the Compositions of the Smaller Scholars." Page two began with "His Lesson," about atoning for bullying, reprinted from "Bright Jewels," followed by several articles, "Little Things," "...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 3, No. 30)
March 9, 1888

The first page opened with a poem, "The Minutes," followed by Marianna Burgess' letter "From California," to the Man-on-the-Band-Stand describing idyllic weather compared to what she's hearing of blizzard conditions at the school. The second page began with an account of the visit and talk by Mr...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 3, No. 32)
March 23, 1888

The first page opened with a poem, "Little Moments," followed by "A Letter," dated March 21, 1888 describing some of the Man-On-the-Band-Stand's observations. The next feature was an article about how to build a periscope. It was titled "Seeing Through a Brick," and continued on the fourth page...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 3, No. 38)
May 4, 1888

The first page opened with a poem "Legend of the 'Forget-Me-Not, '" "From the Scrap-book of a subscriber;" followed by an article called "Happy Accidents," about the importance of self-help. Next came a piece that continued on the fourth page entitled "How Boys Can Make Money." Page two began...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 3, No. 39)
May 11, 1888

The first page opened with a poem "Work a Blessing," followed by a letter "To the Republic Debating Society," from Nancy McIntosh (Creek) reporting her position as teacher in Eufala, Indian Territory. The last article on this page was entitled "Curiosity," which continued on page four. Page two...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 3, No. 43)
June 8, 1888

The first page opened with the poem, "What a Barrel of Whiskey Contains,” followed by an article titled “Welcome!” that reprinted Kish Hawkins’ (Cheyenne) address to a visiting group of Wilson College women. In the talk he described the Outing Program, industrial work, academic work and women’s...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 3, No. 44)
June 15, 1888

The first page opened with an untitled poem, followed by “A Letter from Mr. Standing: How He Finds Things in England,” a travel diary of the Standing Family’s visit to England. Page two included a report of “An Aged Friend,” and news about visits Dr. Given made to Outing students in Bucks County...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 3, No. 46)
June 29, 1888

The first page opened with a poem selected “by Mrs. Pettinos,” titled “The Sun and the Wind,” followed by a conversation about the meaning of the 4th of July and how an Indian School student might be influenced to extend his time at the school instead of returning to the reservation. Page two...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 3, No. 47)
July 6, 1888

The first page opened with a poem by Sarah E. Eastman reprinted from “Golden Days,” titled “If! If!” followed by the reprinted letter from a Carlisle Indian School student on Outing called “She Wants a Higher Education.” The last piece on the page continues on the fourth page called “A Modern...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society

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