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The Indian Helper (Vol. 3, No. 18)
December 9, 1887

The first page opened with a short poem, "Grammar In Rhyme," followed by the memoir of Sioux student, Hope Red Bear about the Battle of the Big Horn, entitled "A Bit of Wild Life." There was also a piece about the treatment of horses called "If Horses Could Speak."  The second page featured news...

Repository: Dickinson College Archives & Special Collections
The Indian Helper (Vol. 3, No. 21)
January 6, 1888

The first page opened with a poem, "What Time Is It?" followed by the story of Indian women whose harvested cache of vegetables had been stolen. The story was titled, "How Some Indians Were Made to Suffer by Their Enemies: A True Story by a Dear, Kind Lady Who Lived For Many Years Among Them."...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 3, No. 24)
January 27, 1888

The first page opened with a poem, "Dare," followed by a story, "Engines and Boys," that reported the arrival by train of the new fire engine called "Uncle Sam." Then came a piece entitled, "Be Neat," on the importance of being neat and orderly. It continued on page four. Page two reported the...

Repository: Dickinson College Archives & Special Collections
The Indian Helper (Vol. 3, No. 26)
February 10, 1888

The first page opened with a poem, "Help One Another," reprinted from "Chambers, Journal;" followed by "7482 Feet High," a letter to the Man-on-the-Band-Stand from M. Burgess, about her journey to California. This page also began a letter from Peoria student Edith Abner, entitled "Visit to...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
February 24, 1888

The first page opened with a poem, "Sowing," followed by the article, "How the Letters Go," that described the process of express mail retrieval and distribution from trains. Then came a letter from former student John Dixon [Dickson] (Pueblo) who wrote about his experiences translating for and...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 3, No. 29)
March 2, 1888

The first page opened with a poem, "Beauty," followed by the article, "What Will Can Do," and "Extracts from the Compositions of the Smaller Scholars." Page two began with "His Lesson," about atoning for bullying, reprinted from "Bright Jewels," followed by several articles, "Little Things," "...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 3, No. 30)
March 9, 1888

The first page opened with a poem, "The Minutes," followed by Marianna Burgess' letter "From California," to the Man-on-the-Band-Stand describing idyllic weather compared to what she's hearing of blizzard conditions at the school. The second page began with an account of the visit and talk by Mr...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 3, No. 32)
March 23, 1888

The first page opened with a poem, "Little Moments," followed by "A Letter," dated March 21, 1888 describing some of the Man-On-the-Band-Stand's observations. The next feature was an article about how to build a periscope. It was titled "Seeing Through a Brick," and continued on the fourth page...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 3, No. 38)
May 4, 1888

The first page opened with a poem "Legend of the 'Forget-Me-Not, '" "From the Scrap-book of a subscriber;" followed by an article called "Happy Accidents," about the importance of self-help. Next came a piece that continued on the fourth page entitled "How Boys Can Make Money." Page two began...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 3, No. 39)
May 11, 1888

The first page opened with a poem "Work a Blessing," followed by a letter "To the Republic Debating Society," from Nancy McIntosh (Creek) reporting her position as teacher in Eufala, Indian Territory. The last article on this page was entitled "Curiosity," which continued on page four. Page two...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 3, No. 43)
June 8, 1888

The first page opened with the poem, "What a Barrel of Whiskey Contains,” followed by an article titled “Welcome!” that reprinted Kish Hawkins’ (Cheyenne) address to a visiting group of Wilson College women. In the talk he described the Outing Program, industrial work, academic work and women’s...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 3, No. 44)
June 15, 1888

The first page opened with an untitled poem, followed by “A Letter from Mr. Standing: How He Finds Things in England,” a travel diary of the Standing Family’s visit to England. Page two included a report of “An Aged Friend,” and news about visits Dr. Given made to Outing students in Bucks County...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 3, No. 46)
June 29, 1888

The first page opened with a poem selected “by Mrs. Pettinos,” titled “The Sun and the Wind,” followed by a conversation about the meaning of the 4th of July and how an Indian School student might be influenced to extend his time at the school instead of returning to the reservation. Page two...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 3, No. 47)
July 6, 1888

The first page opened with a poem by Sarah E. Eastman reprinted from “Golden Days,” titled “If! If!” followed by the reprinted letter from a Carlisle Indian School student on Outing called “She Wants a Higher Education.” The last piece on the page continues on the fourth page called “A Modern...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 3, No. 49)
July 20, 1888

The first page opened with the poem “Be True” followed by an article titled “A Carlisle Teacher on the Big Ocean,” about a trip aboard the Steamer Aurania dated July 6th, 1888 written for the Man-on-the-band-stand by “A Carlisler,” aka Miss Lowe. The article concluded on the fourth page. Page...

Repository: Dickinson College Archives & Special Collections
The Indian Helper (Vol. 3, No. 50)
July 27, 1888

The first page opened with the death notice for Katie Kinshone, one of the Apache babies. It was followed by a poem by Henry Sargent Blake called “Why Come They?” The next item was an article, “No Tobacco in Other Schools,” about the evils of tobacco use and the last piece on the page was an...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 4, No. 11)
October 26, 1888

The first page opens with an untitled poem. The next article titled “Peter Powlass,” contains a letter with news about events at the Oneida, Wisconsin Reservation written by former student, Peter Powlass. It is followed by “U.S. Congress,” that reported the schedule of the Fiftieth Congress....

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 4, No. 12)
November 2, 1888

The first page opened with the poem, “Little Helpers,” reprinted from the Sunday School Times. Next came a piece titled “Environment,” the answer to the previously posted word story, followed by “No Time to Read?” about the importance of reading which continued on the fourth page. Page...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 4, No. 13)
November 9,1888

The first page opened with an untitled poem that bore the first line, “No human life ere dawned on earth.” Then came an article titled “Judge Wright’s Talk,” that excerpted J.V. Wright’s discourse on the importance of the Indian students’ perseverance and the success of the Coeur d’Alene and...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 4, No. 14)
November 16, 1888

The first page opened with a poem, “Be Careful What You Say,” followed by “Indian Names,” on the origin of Indian names. Next came an article titled “Wanted, Something Inside,” about the value of persistence and perseverance, followed by small blurbs about the Christian population of Japan and...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 4, No. 24)
February 1, 1889

The first page began with an untitled poem that opened with the first line “We can never be too careful,” followed by “Which Would You Rather Be a Spider or a Fly? / The White Man Like a Spider,” an account of Mr. Seger’s description of the idiosyncrasies of language translation. It continued on...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 4, No. 28)
March 1, 1889

The first page began with a poem titled, “This Life is What We Make It,” followed by a letter from Samuel Townsend (Pawnee) about school life at Marietta College. The second page included news from letters from former students and an excerpted speech from Thomas Metoxen (Oneida).

Among...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 4, No. 29)
March 8, 1889

The first page opened with a poem "March" by Bessie Chandler followed by an article titled "Feasted By the Blind" which was an account of visiting students from the Pennsylvania Institution for the Instruction of the Blind who got a tour of the Indian school and gave an entertainment that...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 4, No. 39)
May 17, 1889

The first page began with a poem titled “Listen,” reprinted from Harper’s Bazaar, followed by the publication of a letter received from Dolly Gould (Nez Perce) on her work at the Ft. Lapwai School under the title “Appreciation.” Felix Iron Eagle Feather’s (Sioux) letter from his Outing...

Repository: Dickinson College Archives & Special Collections
The Indian Helper (Vol. 4, No. 43)
June 14, 1889

The first page opened with a poem "Wanted,” followed by a fictitious conversation titled “Sallie Lump-of-Mud and Little Miss Sensible Have a Talk.” The page ended with news from Harriet Elder (Nez Perce) and her agency, titled “This Was My Name When at School – Harriet M. Elder.” Page two...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society

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