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Benjamin Thomas, Jane Vane, a female student and a visitor [version 1], c.1884

Studio portrait of Benjamin Thomas, Jane Vane, an unidentified female student and a visitor, probably a Pueblo chief or family member. 

Note: The identification of Benjamin Thomas comes from previous cataloging of this NAA negative. The identification of Jane Vane comes from an annotation...

Format: Glass Plate Negative
Repository: National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Eadle Keatah Toh (Vol. 1, No. 1)
January 1880

The first page opened with a report titled "THE INDIAN TRAINING SCHOOL," that described the progress of the school, its Christian methods, the work of the Florida boys preparing buildings for use, the importance of the town Sunday Schools, the school curriculum that emphasized farmwork for boys...

Repository: National Archives and Records Administration
Eadle Keatah Toh (Vol. 1, No. 10)
April 1881

Page one opened with a letter to Carlisle from “An Old Soldier” who had been stationed at the Carlisle Barracks forty years earlier. There were also three other letters to residents of the school from Peter Primaux, Paul C.T., and Arizona Jackson. The rest of the page was one to two sentence...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
Eadle Keatah Toh (Vol. 1, No. 3)
May 1880

Page one opened with statistics on what tribe, age, and gender the students were. There were also various reviews of other schools, both day and boarding, and information on their attendance. Page two had an article on the actions of the Indians who were opposed to the Indian schools and the...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
Eadle Keatah Toh (Vol. 1, No. 5)
August 1880

Page one had a report on a bill that would “increase educational privileges and establish industrial schools for the benefit of youth belonging to such nomadic Indian tribes as have educational treaty claims upon the United States.” It also talked about the creation of the Carlisle Industrial...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
Eadle Keatah Toh (Vol. 2, No. 1)
August 1881

Page one opened with Lapi Oaye talking about the school system in America and how it is beneficial to Indian and while children alike. Page two had a bit on the humor of incorrectly spelled names, followed by an Article written by E.G.P. on increasing the time Indians spend in both office and...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
Eadle Keatah Toh (Vol. 2, No. 2)
September 1881

Page one opened with a poem by E.G.P. and the story of the Great Turtle, which was based on the arrival of a Spanish Ship. There was also a piece on the trouble that Billy Cornipachio faced, which included the opposition of his people to his education. Page two had a piece about visiting chiefs...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
Eadle Keatah Toh (Vol. 2, No. 7)
February 1882

Page one had a letter to Capt. Richard H. Pratt on the methods followed in schools by Principal C. M. Semple. It also had an article titled “Indian Idiosyncrasies” about how Indians seem to have a better sense of direction than white people. Page two has the continuation of the previous article...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
Group of visiting chiefs with Richard Henry Pratt, c.1881

Group portrait of thirteen Native American men, probably visiting chiefs, with five white men and Richard Henry Pratt (seated in chair at right). They are posed in front of the bandstand on the school grounds.

Format: Glass Plate Negative
Repository: National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Richard Henry Pratt with a group of visitors and students [version 1], 1887

Portrait of Richard Henry Pratt with a group of white adults and students posed on the porch of a building on the school grounds. 

The Cumberland County Historical Society's version of this image identifies the other white man as Inspector Morris A. Thomas and one of the white women as...

Format: Glass Plate Negative
Repository: National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Richard Henry Pratt with a group of visitors and students [version 2], 1887

Portrait of Richard Henry Pratt with a group of white adults and students posed on the porch of a building on the school grounds. 

The Cumberland County Historical Society's version of this image identifies the other white man as Inspector Morris A. Thomas and one of the white women as...

Format: Glass Plate Negative
Repository: National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
School News (Vol. 1, No. 2)
July 1880

The first article is by John Downing (Cherokee), titles “Learning How to Use Bad Things.” In which he writes about alcohol and the benefits of being nice to the people of the United States, and a letter from Moses Nonway to his mother asking on the health of his people and reflecting on their...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
T.J. Morgan, Commissioner of Indian Affairs, with Richard Henry Pratt and teachers, c.1890

Portrait of T.J. Morgan, the Commissioner of Indian Affairs, posed with Richard Henry Pratt and the school's teachers on the school grounds. 

The school newspapers reported a visited by Morgan to the school in February of 1890. It's possible that this photograph was taken at that time...

Format: Photographic Print, B&W
Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 1, No. 31)
March 12, 1886

The first page opened with a poem titled "Patient Holding Out,” by Alice Carey. This was followed by sets of twenty-two rules of behavior titled “What a Girl Should Learn” and "What a Boy Should Learn.” The page ended with a paragraph about labor strikes. Page two was filled with small news...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 1, No. 44)
June 11, 1886

The first page opened with a poem titled "I'm Not Too Young" reprinted from Scattered Seeds. The next article, "Hoe Handle Medicine" extolled the medicinal effects of exercise. Page two featured several small stories, including Paul Eagle Star's (Sioux) Outing assignment, a piece...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 1, No. 46)
June 25, 1886

The first page opened with a poem titled “Be Honest and True," followed by the story of "Two Gentlemen," who showed good manners. Page two included news about school visitors, the prayer meeting, printer equipment gifts, details of the Carlisle Indian School’s baseball defeat at the hands of...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 2, No. 14)
November 12, 1886

The first page opened with a poem titled "A Fourteen-Year-Old Girl's Good Advice," followed by an article called "The Menomonees and Pottawatomies Dance: A Story by Lucy Jordan, Stockbridge, a pupil from Wisconsin," that told of an 1882 visit by dancers to her home agency in Keshena, Wisconsin....

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 2, No. 29)
February 25, 1887

The first page opened with a poem titled “New Every Morning,” followed by "An Indian Woman Fought For Her Husband After Receiving a Beating From Him" which concluded on the fourth page. Page two gave news from the Chemawa and Genoa Indian Schools, and "A Nice Pocket Book for the Best," asking...

Repository: Dickinson College Archives & Special Collections
The Indian Helper (Vol. 2, No. 36)
April 15, 1887

This issue opened with a poem titled “THE HORSE’S PETITION,” followed by an alphabet poem titled “HOW TO GET RICH AND BECOME FAMOUS.” “TRUE COURAGE” offered a treatise on the rewards of kindness. Page two opened with news of a measles outbreak at the Ponca Agency, the influence of Carlisle...

Repository: Dickinson College Archives & Special Collections
The Indian Helper (Vol. 2, No. 37)
April 22, 1887

This issue opened with a poem titled “Kindness” followed by a reprint from the Word Carrier, “Manners” that compared ill-mannered behavior to animal traits and was intended as a lesson to Carlisle students. Also on that page was a paragraph reprinted from the Genoa Indian School...

Repository: Dickinson College Archives & Special Collections
The Indian Helper (Vol. 2, No. 41)
May 20, 1887

This issue opened with a poem titled “BE CAREFUL,” followed by an account of how “Aunt Martha” nearly drowned near the Genoa School in Nebraska titled “AN INDIAN GIRL SAVED THE LIFE OF A TEACHER,” followed by a reprint from The Indian Citizen that extolled the competence of Indian boys...

Repository: Dickinson College Archives & Special Collections
The Indian Helper (Vol. 2, No. 42)
May 27, 1887

The first page opened with the poem "Take Care" followed by "A Visitor at Carlisle" which provided the opportunity to present arguments for Indian education away from the reservations. It continued on page four. Page two opened with an account of a presentation by "Dr. Harmon and Col. Thomas," a...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 2, No. 43)
June 3, 1887

The first page opened with the poem "Strength For To-Day" followed by a piece called "Going Home!" The article gave a fictitious conversation between Carlisle students Allie and Fanny about the disadvantages of going home to the reservation because of the unsanitary conditions and practices...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 2, No. 47)
July 1, 1887

This issue opened with a poem titled “CLASS OF INDIAN BOYS,” written by a Quaker farm wife about a group of Outing students. The next article was titled “A TRIP” by Katie Grinrod (Wyandotte), which gave the account of her and Clara Cornelius’(Oneida) trip to Philadelphia with their Outing family...

Repository: Dickinson College Archives & Special Collections
The Indian Helper (Vol. 3, No. 11)
October 21, 1887

The first page began with the poem, "Nobility," by Alice Cary followed by "A Letter from a Dear Old Lady of Eighty Years of Age," who shared her childhood recollections of life among the Tuscarora Indians camped on her family's land in Canada, some of whom became her playmates. This letter was...

Repository: Dickinson College Archives & Special Collections

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