Student Recruitment

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Report on First Party of Children Brought to the Carlisle Indian School

Captain Richard Henry Pratt writes to Ezra H. Hayt, Commissioner of Indian Affairs, regarding the first group of Sioux, Ponca, Pawnee, Kiowa, Comanche, Wichita, Seminole, Cheyenne, and Arapahoe children and young adults brought to the Carlisle Indian School. Pratt offers a detailed description...

Format: Letters/Correspondence, Reports
Repository: National Archives and Records Administration
Letter from Richard H. Pratt to Cornelius R. Agnew, December 11, 1883

Superintendent Richard Henry Pratt writes to Doctor Cornelius Rea Agnew with an update on the school and the rising number of students. He also writes about his desire to find benefactors interested in creating a new Indian industrial school to accommodate more students. This letter is part of a...

Format: Letters/Correspondence
Repository: Dickinson College Archives & Special Collections
Letter from Richard H. Pratt to Cornelius R. Agnew, June 9, 1884

Superintendent Richard Henry Pratt writes to Doctor Cornelius Rea Agnew regarding their upcoming trip to the west and the visit of Mr. Blaine to Carlisle to lay the cornerstone for Bosler Hall. This letter is part of a series of correspondence which can be found using the People tags. Transcript...

Format: Letters/Correspondence
Repository: Dickinson College Archives & Special Collections
Letter from Richard H. Pratt to Cornelius R. Agnew, July 2, 1884

Superintendent Richard Henry Pratt writes to Doctor Cornelius Rea Agnew regarding Agnew's nomination to an unnamed committee.  Pratt also discusses his ability to recruit more students thanks to the passing of the Indian Appropriations Bill.  This letter is part of a series of related...

Format: Letters/Correspondence
Repository: Dickinson College Archives & Special Collections
Letter from Richard H. Pratt to Cornelius R. Agnew, July 15, 1884

Superintendent Richard Henry Pratt writes to Doctor Cornelius Rea Agnew attempting to arrange a visit, as well as a trip to the west to recruit students.  Pratt asks Agnew to come along to help select healthy children, and suggests that they rest in the Las Vegas, New Mexico Hot Springs.  This...

Format: Letters/Correspondence
Repository: Dickinson College Archives & Special Collections
Letter from M. S. Juslyn to Cornelius R. Agnew, July 26, 1884

Acting Secretary in the Department of the Interior M. S. Juslyn writes to Doctor Cornelius Rea Agnew enclosing an order securing Agency and Indian Service assistance for Agnew while he is in the West. 

Format: Letters/Correspondence
Repository: Dickinson College Archives & Special Collections
Letter from Richard H. Pratt to Cornelius R. Agnew, June 1, 1886

Superindendent Richard Henry Pratt writes to Doctor Cornelius Rea Agnew regarding plans for new and renovated buildings at Carlisle.  Pratt states that he does not intend to take on more students, but rather to create a more individualized training environment.  He compares Carlisle's...

Format: Letters/Correspondence
Repository: Dickinson College Archives & Special Collections
Inquiry Regarding Closure of the Carlisle Indian School

This document contains correspondence between former Carlisle student R. J. Bonga and Assistant Commissioner E. B. Merritt concerning Bonga's desire to enroll students from his area in the closed Carlisle Indian School.

Format: Letters/Correspondence
Repository: National Archives and Records Administration
Eadle Keatah Toh (Vol. 1, No. 1)
January 1880

The first page opened with a report titled "THE INDIAN TRAINING SCHOOL," that described the progress of the school, its Christian methods, the work of the Florida boys preparing buildings for use, the importance of the town Sunday Schools, the school curriculum that emphasized farmwork for boys...

Repository: National Archives and Records Administration
Eadle Keatah Toh (Vol. 1, No. 5)
August 1880

Page one had a report on a bill that would “increase educational privileges and establish industrial schools for the benefit of youth belonging to such nomadic Indian tribes as have educational treaty claims upon the United States.” It also talked about the creation of the Carlisle Industrial...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
School News (Vol. 1, No. 5)
October 1880

The fifth issue opens with Roman Nose describing his trip back to Indian Territory and his reunion with his family. While there he expresses his enjoyment of the school and the benefits of education, eventually convincing the chiefs to sends twenty-one Cheyenne children and Ten Arapahoe children...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
Eadle Keatah Toh (Vol. 1, No. 7)
November 1880

Page one had a report on the first year of operation of the Carlisle Industrial School, mentioning when students arrived, how many and where from. Also it described several trades the students were learning what how they were learning them. Page two had information about the Menomonee Agency and...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The School News (Vol. 3, No. 1)
June 1882

On the first page Justine A. LaFromboise describes her trip to Carlisle, explaining how her father convinced her to go get an education. The story continues onto page four. On page two Ellis B. Childers (Creek) explained that he will be the editor while Charles Kihega (Iowa) visits home. C....

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 3, No. 1)
August 12, 1887

In a front page letter dated July 27, 1887 and addressed to the Man-on-the-Band-Stand from the Pine Ridge Agency, Marianna Burgess, who was recruiting new students to the Carlisle Indian School, complained of her uncomfortable accommodations and surroundings. The second page featured "A Story of...

Repository: Dickinson College Archives & Special Collections
The Indian Helper (Vol. 3, No. 46)
June 29, 1888

The first page opened with a poem selected “by Mrs. Pettinos,” titled “The Sun and the Wind,” followed by a conversation about the meaning of the 4th of July and how an Indian School student might be influenced to extend his time at the school instead of returning to the reservation. Page two...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 4, No. 6)
September 21, 1888

The first page opened with an untitled poem by J. W. Burgess reprinted from Sunshine, followed by “Our Walnut Tree” about the Man-On-the-Band-Stand’s efforts to keep students from picking green walnuts. The second page began with “The Captain,” which described the speech Capt. Pratt...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 4, No. 8)
October 5, 1888

The first page opened with a poem “The Two Words,” followed by Lucy Jordan’s letter to the Man-On-The-Band-Stand titled “Carlisle A Bright Picture” in which she mused about her days’ past at Carlisle and life at home on the Stockbridge Reservation. Next came “A Budget of News from Eliza Bell” (...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 4, No. 9)
October 12, 1888

The first page opened with an untitled poem, with the first line “God Wants the Boys,” followed by anonymous advice “Be Inventive.” Next came two columns, “Girls Read This,” an exercise for good posture and “Boys Read This,” an exercise for good behavior. The news items on page two gave reports...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 4, No. 13)
November 9,1888

The first page opened with an untitled poem that bore the first line, “No human life ere dawned on earth.” Then came an article titled “Judge Wright’s Talk,” that excerpted J.V. Wright’s discourse on the importance of the Indian students’ perseverance and the success of the Coeur d’Alene and...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 4, No. 14)
November 16, 1888

The first page opened with a poem, “Be Careful What You Say,” followed by “Indian Names,” on the origin of Indian names. Next came an article titled “Wanted, Something Inside,” about the value of persistence and perseverance, followed by small blurbs about the Christian population of Japan and...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 4, No. 18)
December 14, 1888

The first page opened with a poem titled “How To Make Up,” followed by an article reprinted from The Sabbath School Visitor titled “Playthings of the Indian Children.” Next came a letter from Nancy Cornelius (Oneida) titled “Items of Interest From Nancy Cornelius,” which was sent from the...

Repository: Dickinson College Archives & Special Collections
The Indian Helper (Vol. 4, No. 52)
August 16, 1889

The first page opened with a poem "Our Orderly,” about a seven-year-old Apache boy. The next article, “On A Band Stand,” was about children telling stories on the band stand, which continued on the fourth page. Page two opened with excerpts of letters “From the Out Pupils,” followed by the...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 5, No. 5)
September 20, 1889

The first page opened with a poem "The Singer’s Alms: An Incident in the Life of the Great Tenor, Mario” by Henry Abbey, followed by the first installment in a series of articles written by the Man-on-the-Band-Stand about a Pueblo girl named Mollie. These stories were later published in book...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
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