Student Arrival

Primary tabs

Displaying 1 - 25 of 32 records
Chauncey Yellow Robe, Henry Standing Bear, and Wounded Yellow Robe, 1883 and 1886

The caption reads: WOUNDED YELLOW ROBE. HENRY STANDING BEAR. CHAUNCY YELLOW ROBE.

SIOUX BOYS AS THEY ENTERED THE SCHOOL IN 1883. THREE YEARS LATER.

This image appears in John N. Choate's Souvenir of the Carlisle Indian School (Carlisle, PA...

Format: Photograph, Reproduction
Repository: Dickinson College Archives & Special Collections
Eadle Keahtah Toh (Vol. 1, No. 2)
April 1880

Page one opened with a teacher reminiscing on his Time teaching in Carlisle. Also on the page was an article on the civilization of the Indians, comparing it to the conquests of Rome and their assimilation of less educated people. Page two opens with an article on older student, above age...

Repository: Dickinson College Archives & Special Collections
Group of Eskimo students, 1897

The caption reads: ESKIMO GROUP. AS THEY ENTERED CARLISLE IN 1897. AS THEY APPEAR IN SCHOOL DRESS.

This image appears in John N. Choate's Souvenir of the Carlisle Indian School (Carlisle, PA: J. N. Choate, 1902).

Format: Photograph, Reproduction
Repository: Dickinson College Archives & Special Collections
Group of Pueblo girls, Carlisle Indian School, 1884

The caption reads: GROUP OF PUEBLO GIRLS – ENTERED CARLISLE IN 1884.

This image appears in John N. Choate's Souvenir of the Carlisle Indian School (Carlisle, PA: J. N. Choate, 1902).

Format: Photograph, Reproduction
Repository: Dickinson College Archives & Special Collections
Notice of Arrival of First Group of Students

Telegram from Richard Henry Pratt informing the Commissioner of Indian Affairs that he has arrived in Carlisle with the first party of students. Pratt also asks about his previous requests for supplies and rations, which have gone unanswered.

Format: Letters/Correspondence
Repository: National Archives and Records Administration
Notice of Arrival of Group of Students from Wichita, Kansas

Richard Henry Pratt writes to Commissioner of Indian Affairs Ezra Hayt, informing him that his party of recruited students, met and delayed in Wichita, Kansas, safely arrived in Carlisle the previous evening.

Format: Letters/Correspondence
Repository: National Archives and Records Administration
Notice of Arrival of Iowa and Sac & Fox Students

Richard Henry Pratt telegrams Acting Commissioner of Indian Affairs Edwin J. Brooks, informing him that a group of Iowa and Sac & Fox children arrived safely and will be held as directed.

Format: Letters/Correspondence
Repository: National Archives and Records Administration
Notice of Arrival of Sioux and Menominee Students for Hampton Institute

Telegram from Richard Henry Pratt noting the arrival of Sisseton, Standing Rock, and Cheyenne River Sioux children, Green Bay Menominee children, and Chief Little Noheart at Carlisle. Pratt requests whether these children should be sent to the Hampton Institute.

Format: Letters/Correspondence
Repository: National Archives and Records Administration
Report on First Party of Children Brought to the Carlisle Indian School

Captain Richard Henry Pratt writes to Ezra H. Hayt, Commissioner of Indian Affairs, regarding the first group of Sioux, Ponca, Pawnee, Kiowa, Comanche, Wichita, Seminole, Cheyenne, and Arapahoe children and young adults brought to the Carlisle Indian School. Pratt offers a detailed description...

Format: Letters/Correspondence, Reports
Repository: National Archives and Records Administration
Sioux girls arrive in Carlisle, 1879

This caption reads: FIRST SIOUX GIRLS – AS THEY CAME TO CARLISLE   OCT. 6TH, 1879.

This image appears in John N. Choate's Souvenir of the Carlisle Indian School (Carlisle, PA: J. N. Choate, 1902).

Format: Photograph, Reproduction
Repository: Dickinson College Archives & Special Collections
The Indian Helper (Vol. 1, No. 14)
November 13, 1885

The first page opened with a poem titled "Found in the Path," followed by an article called "Are You His Equal?" that described an incident in which the Man-on-the-Band-Stand corrected a Carlisle student's letter home because it contained disparaging language toward those with darker skin. There...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 1, No. 16)
November 27, 1885

The first page opened with a poem titled “Snow Brings Fun,” followed by instructions for “How to Write to Your Mother,” directed to a young man with instructions for how to reply to his mother who was pleading for his return back to his home agency. Page two opened with a series of news items...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 3, No. 1)
August 12, 1887

In a front page letter dated July 27, 1887 and addressed to the Man-on-the-Band-Stand from the Pine Ridge Agency, Marianna Burgess, who was recruiting new students to the Carlisle Indian School, complained of her uncomfortable accommodations and surroundings. The second page featured "A Story of...

Repository: Dickinson College Archives & Special Collections
The Indian Helper (Vol. 3, No. 15)
November 18, 1887

The first page opened with the poem, "Work and Play," followed by a reprint of Dennison Wheelock's first prize essay entitled, "Is It Right for the Government to Stop the Teaching of Indian Languages in Reservation Schools," arguing for the affirmative. The second page featured news about...

Repository: Dickinson College Archives & Special Collections
The Indian Helper (Vol. 3, No. 2)
August 19, 1887

The first page featured a conversation, continued from the previous week’s issue, between Marianna Burgess and the Man-on-the-Band-Stand, related to the filthiness of the Indians at the Pine Ridge and Rosebud Agencies. Topics included a description of issue day and harvesting cattle. Page two...

Repository: Dickinson College Archives & Special Collections
The Indian Helper (Vol. 3, No. 3)
August 26, 1887

The first page continued Marianna Burgess' report of conditions at the Rosebud and Pine Ridge Sioux Agencies begun in Volume 2, including her visit to Luther Standing Bear's home. Page two reported a visit to the school by some deaf school principals who "much interested our boys with their...

Repository: Dickinson College Archives & Special Collections
The Indian Helper (Vol. 3, No. 34)
April 6, 1888

The first page opened with a poem "The Happy Philosopher," followed by "From the Indian Question to the Weather," a piece describing stereotypical prejudices and the importance of keeping Indians away from idle influences. Then came a report, "Our Guardhouse," extracted from essays by Richard...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 4, No. 12)
November 2, 1888

The first page opened with the poem, “Little Helpers,” reprinted from the Sunday School Times. Next came a piece titled “Environment,” the answer to the previously posted word story, followed by “No Time to Read?” about the importance of reading which continued on the fourth page. Page...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 4, No. 13)
November 9,1888

The first page opened with an untitled poem that bore the first line, “No human life ere dawned on earth.” Then came an article titled “Judge Wright’s Talk,” that excerpted J.V. Wright’s discourse on the importance of the Indian students’ perseverance and the success of the Coeur d’Alene and...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 4, No. 15)
November 23, 1888

The first page opened with a poem titled “IT PAYS," followed by a piece called "THANKSGIVING!" that reminded readers to be thankful. Next came "REV MR. WILSON EXPLAINS HIS 'MONKEY ADDRESS,'" which was a letter to the Editor from Edward Wilson from Darlington, Indian Territory dated Nov. 13, 1888...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 4, No. 17)
December 7, 1888

This issue opened with a poem titled “HOW," by John Boyle O'Reilly, followed by news from a letter from Carlisle alumnus Samuel Townsend (Pawnee), a student at Marietta College. Page two included news items about Congress convening, Nancy Cornelius (Oneida) attending the Woman's National Indian...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 4, No. 18)
December 14, 1888

The first page opened with a poem titled “How To Make Up,” followed by an article reprinted from The Sabbath School Visitor titled “Playthings of the Indian Children.” Next came a letter from Nancy Cornelius (Oneida) titled “Items of Interest From Nancy Cornelius,” which was sent from the...

Repository: Dickinson College Archives & Special Collections
The Indian Helper (Vol. 4, No. 19)
December 21, 1888

The first page opened with a poem titled “GOD'S CHRISTMAS GIFTS," by Dwight Weldon. Also on the page were numerous Christmas articles, including a piece about the spirit of giving called "A MERRY CHRISTMAS! A HAPPY NEW YEAR!" and a reprint from Sunshine about the meaning of A.D. 1888....

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 4, No. 52)
August 16, 1889

The first page opened with a poem "Our Orderly,” about a seven-year-old Apache boy. The next article, “On A Band Stand,” was about children telling stories on the band stand, which continued on the fourth page. Page two opened with excerpts of letters “From the Out Pupils,” followed by the...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 4, No. 8)
October 5, 1888

The first page opened with a poem “The Two Words,” followed by Lucy Jordan’s letter to the Man-On-The-Band-Stand titled “Carlisle A Bright Picture” in which she mused about her days’ past at Carlisle and life at home on the Stockbridge Reservation. Next came “A Budget of News from Eliza Bell” (...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society

Pages

Subscribe to Student Arrival