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Displaying 51 - 75 of 367 records
The Indian Helper (Vol. 3, No. 52)
August 10, 1888

The first page opened with the poem, “What Makes A Man,” followed by an article titled, “Interesting Observations At the Indians’ Own Home” reprinting a letter from Joshua Given (Kiowa) who described the social and political news from the Kiowa and Comanche Agency. He reported the activities of...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 4, No. 1)
August 17, 1888

The first page opened with the poem, “What the Flowers Said,” followed by an article reprinted from The Baltimorean, titled "Men Who Were Laughed At,” about how technologies were first spurned. Page two featured several news reports about the band, outing experiences, news from the...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 4, No. 11)
October 26, 1888

The first page opens with an untitled poem. The next article titled “Peter Powlass,” contains a letter with news about events at the Oneida, Wisconsin Reservation written by former student, Peter Powlass. It is followed by “U.S. Congress,” that reported the schedule of the Fiftieth Congress....

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 4, No. 14)
November 16, 1888

The first page opened with a poem, “Be Careful What You Say,” followed by “Indian Names,” on the origin of Indian names. Next came an article titled “Wanted, Something Inside,” about the value of persistence and perseverance, followed by small blurbs about the Christian population of Japan and...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 4, No. 15)
November 23, 1888

The first page opened with a poem titled “IT PAYS," followed by a piece called "THANKSGIVING!" that reminded readers to be thankful. Next came "REV MR. WILSON EXPLAINS HIS 'MONKEY ADDRESS,'" which was a letter to the Editor from Edward Wilson from Darlington, Indian Territory dated Nov. 13, 1888...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 4, No. 18)
December 14, 1888

The first page opened with a poem titled “How To Make Up,” followed by an article reprinted from The Sabbath School Visitor titled “Playthings of the Indian Children.” Next came a letter from Nancy Cornelius (Oneida) titled “Items of Interest From Nancy Cornelius,” which was sent from the...

Repository: Dickinson College Archives & Special Collections
The Indian Helper (Vol. 4, No. 19)
December 21, 1888

The first page opened with a poem titled “GOD'S CHRISTMAS GIFTS," by Dwight Weldon. Also on the page were numerous Christmas articles, including a piece about the spirit of giving called "A MERRY CHRISTMAS! A HAPPY NEW YEAR!" and a reprint from Sunshine about the meaning of A.D. 1888....

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 4, No. 25)
February 8, 1889

The first page began with a poem titled “Do Your Best,” followed by “The Man-On-the-Band-Stand and a Stranger,” which described the “old gentleman’s” effort to thwart the hiring of an Outing student who was careless with arithmetic. It continued on page four. Page two began with “A Manly...

Repository: Dickinson College Archives & Special Collections
The Indian Helper (Vol. 4, No. 27)
February 22, 1889

The first page began with the heading, “February 22,” followed by poems and articles about George Washington and his birthday. Also on the page was a piece called “Do Indian Boys Have It?” about the pitfalls of self-conceit. Page two included many small articles that included an update of area...

Repository: Dickinson College Archives & Special Collections
The Indian Helper (Vol. 4, No. 3)
August 31, 1888

The first page opened with a poem, “Good Advice,” followed by a fictional account of a conversation titled “Two Carlisle Boys at Pine Ridge Talk Over the Sioux Bill,” in which two former students, Zack and Tim, discuss the merits of signing the Severalty Act which had been presented to the...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 4, No. 30)
March 15, 1889

The first page opened with a poem "Think," followed by a story called "Are Indians Kind to Animals? about a Carlisle girl on Outing who threw a blanket over a horse during icy weather. The next piece was about the value of labor titled "Successful Men." Page two began with an article titled "...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 4, No. 31)
March 22, 1889

The first page began with a poem titled, “True Heroism,” followed by a fictional conversation among two Indian School students, Tom and Phil as reported by the Man-On-The-Band-Stand. In the moralizing story, continued on the fourth page, Phil sets a good example by keeping the Outing System...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 4, No. 33)
April 5, 1889

The first page began with a poem titled, “The Tongue,” followed by the Man-on-the-band-stand’s discussion in “Never Before,” that explained that a horde of boys would be marching east toward opportunity but a horde of boys would be marching west toward degradation, which he described as “evil...

Repository: Dickinson College Archives & Special Collections
The Indian Helper (Vol. 4, No. 35)
April 19, 1889

The first page began with a poem titled, “Easter Blossoms,” followed by a notice of “The Wedding” between Guy LeRoy Stevick and Marion Pratt, the daughter of Capt. Pratt. The ceremony was performed by Rev. Dr. Norcross of Second Presbyterian Church followed by a reception for 500 guests in the...

Repository: Dickinson College Archives & Special Collections
The Indian Helper (Vol. 4, No. 36)
April 26, 1889

The first page opened with a poem "The Printer-Boy Tramp” by Will Carleton, followed by “Encouraging Prospects” about Luther Kuhns at the Pawnee Agency. Next came “A Man Who was not Afraid to Work” on how General Washington set an example for his corporal. Also on the page was an article titled...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 4, No. 39)
May 17, 1889

The first page began with a poem titled “Listen,” reprinted from Harper’s Bazaar, followed by the publication of a letter received from Dolly Gould (Nez Perce) on her work at the Ft. Lapwai School under the title “Appreciation.” Felix Iron Eagle Feather’s (Sioux) letter from his Outing...

Repository: Dickinson College Archives & Special Collections
The Indian Helper (Vol. 4, No. 4)
September 7, 1888

The first page opened with a poem, “Grasp the Nettle,” followed by a reprinted letter to Superintendent Pratt from Conrad Roubideaux (Sioux) titled “Conrad Didn’t Give Up the Ship,” in which he described the hardships of finding work on the reservation. Page two included news that Pratt was out...

Repository: Private Collection
The Indian Helper (Vol. 4, No. 49)
July 26, 1889

The first page opened with a Longfellow poem "The Ladder of St. Augustine” followed by James Black Hawk’s letter about the Fourth of July at Pine Ridge Agency titled “In the Right Spirit.” Page one also contained “Doing His Duty,” about how a seemingly unrecognized worker was promoted because of...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 4, No. 51)
August 9, 1889

The first page opened with a poem "Willie’s First Boots” followed by “What Lawrence Learned,” about how Right Time and Right Place brought a boy success, reprinted from Wide Awake. Page two opened with a travelogue through California and Arizona to the Grand Canyon titled “Elevation –...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 4, No. 52)
August 16, 1889

The first page opened with a poem "Our Orderly,” about a seven-year-old Apache boy. The next article, “On A Band Stand,” was about children telling stories on the band stand, which continued on the fourth page. Page two opened with excerpts of letters “From the Out Pupils,” followed by the...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 4, No. 6)
September 21, 1888

The first page opened with an untitled poem by J. W. Burgess reprinted from Sunshine, followed by “Our Walnut Tree” about the Man-On-the-Band-Stand’s efforts to keep students from picking green walnuts. The second page began with “The Captain,” which described the speech Capt. Pratt...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 5, No. 15)
November 29, 1889

The first page opened with a query titled "Who is that Man-on-the-band-stand?” followed by E.G.’s poem, “The Man-on-the-band-stand.” Next came a new installment of the series titled “How An Indian Girl Might Tell Her Own Story if She Had the Chance: Founded on Actual Observations of the Man-on-...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 5, No. 18)
December 20, 1889

The first page opened with a poem titled "A Christmas Carol by Eleanor W.F. Bates in Home Magazine. Next came a new installment of the series titled “How An Indian Girl Might Tell Her Own Story if She Had the Chance: Founded on Actual Observations of the Man-on-the-band-stand’s Chief...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 5, No. 5)
September 20, 1889

The first page opened with a poem "The Singer’s Alms: An Incident in the Life of the Great Tenor, Mario” by Henry Abbey, followed by the first installment in a series of articles written by the Man-on-the-Band-Stand about a Pueblo girl named Mollie. These stories were later published in book...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Morning Star (Vol. 4, No. 1)
August 1883

Page one opens with a letter from the Secretary of the Interior, H.M. Teller, about the education of Indians. Page two had the Address Captain Pratt gave at the National Educational Convention at Ocean Grove, NJ. This address continued on to page three. After the end of Captain Pratt’s address,...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society

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