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The Indian Helper (Vol. 2, No. 16)
November 26, 1886

The first page opened with a poem titled "Sound Principle But Poor Poetry," followed by "A Boy Needs a Trade," about the degradation of a ditch digger reprinted from the Detroit Free Press. There was also an article called "A Sick Man who Wanted Whiskey." The second page included a report in the...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 2, No. 17)
December 3, 1886

The first page opened with a poem titled “"Health Alphabet" listing health advice, A-Z followed by a description of horse grooming titled "George Washington's Horse." Page two opened with an article titled "Silver" that admonished Indian students to fight against the theft of land and resources...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 2, No. 21)
December 31, 1886

The first page opened with a poem titled "A Happy New Year to You," followed by a poem called "Santa Claus at Home," about his return to the North Pole. The next article, "The Cold Water Man," was about the dangers of drinking beer, reprinted from Maryland Bulletin. Also on the page was...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 3, No. 49)
July 20, 1888

The first page opened with the poem “Be True” followed by an article titled “A Carlisle Teacher on the Big Ocean,” about a trip aboard the Steamer Aurania dated July 6th, 1888 written for the Man-on-the-band-stand by “A Carlisler,” aka Miss Lowe. The article concluded on the fourth page. Page...

Repository: Dickinson College Archives & Special Collections
The Indian Helper (Vol. 3, No. 52)
August 10, 1888

The first page opened with the poem, “What Makes A Man,” followed by an article titled, “Interesting Observations At the Indians’ Own Home” reprinting a letter from Joshua Given (Kiowa) who described the social and political news from the Kiowa and Comanche Agency. He reported the activities of...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 4, No. 16)
November 30, 1888

The first page opened with a poem, “Judge Wright’s Farewell: Read By Him Before Our Students Last Saturday Night,” followed by “A Boy Who Could Be Trusted,” about an unnamed boy who revealed news of Lee’s troops marching to Gettysburg. Next came a reprint of a letter that told of the good work...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 4, No. 29)
March 8, 1889

The first page opened with a poem "March" by Bessie Chandler followed by an article titled "Feasted By the Blind" which was an account of visiting students from the Pennsylvania Institution for the Instruction of the Blind who got a tour of the Indian school and gave an entertainment that...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 4, No. 33)
April 5, 1889

The first page began with a poem titled, “The Tongue,” followed by the Man-on-the-band-stand’s discussion in “Never Before,” that explained that a horde of boys would be marching east toward opportunity but a horde of boys would be marching west toward degradation, which he described as “evil...

Repository: Dickinson College Archives & Special Collections
The Indian Helper (Vol. 4, No. 36)
April 26, 1889

The first page opened with a poem "The Printer-Boy Tramp” by Will Carleton, followed by “Encouraging Prospects” about Luther Kuhns at the Pawnee Agency. Next came “A Man Who was not Afraid to Work” on how General Washington set an example for his corporal. Also on the page was an article titled...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 5, No. 11)
November 1, 1889

The first page opened with a poem by Ella Wheeler with the first line "Oh What Am I but an Engine Shod” followed by the next installment of the series titled “How An Indian Girl Might Tell Her Own Story if She Had the Chance: Founded on Actual Observations of the Man-on-the-band-stand’s Chief...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 5, No. 14)
November 22, 1889

The first page opened with a poem by E.G. titled "After Carlisle, What?” followed by the next installment of the series titled “How An Indian Girl Might Tell Her Own Story if She Had the Chance: Founded on Actual Observations of the Man-on-the-band-stand’s Chief Clerk” (continued from the...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 5, No. 15)
November 29, 1889

The first page opened with a query titled "Who is that Man-on-the-band-stand?” followed by E.G.’s poem, “The Man-on-the-band-stand.” Next came a new installment of the series titled “How An Indian Girl Might Tell Her Own Story if She Had the Chance: Founded on Actual Observations of the Man-on-...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 5, No. 18)
December 20, 1889

The first page opened with a poem titled "A Christmas Carol by Eleanor W.F. Bates in Home Magazine. Next came a new installment of the series titled “How An Indian Girl Might Tell Her Own Story if She Had the Chance: Founded on Actual Observations of the Man-on-the-band-stand’s Chief...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 5, No. 7)
October 4, 1889

The first page opened with a poem "Bear It in Mind” followed by the third installment of the series titled “How An Indian Girl Might Tell Her Own Story if She Had the Chance: All Founded on Actual Observations of the Man-on-the-band-stand’s Chief Clerk” which continued on the fourth page. Page...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Morning Star (Vol. 4, No. 5)
December 1883

Page one opened with an article titled “Strong Words for the Indians From Commissioner Price”, along with “A Plea for Civilized Indians”, “Two Pueblo Boys”, and “The Baby”. Page two had Captain Pratt’s account of his visit to the west. It also had comments from various chiefs on their opinion on...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The School News (Vol. 1, No. 12)
May 1881

Number 12. Opened with a letter from Charles Kauboodle (Kiowa) to his cousin Laura, talking about what they’ve learned in school, their family, and wishing her a quick recovery from the sickness she has. Jessa Bent also had a few sentences on the desert published at the bottom of the page. The...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The School News (Vol. 1, No. 8)
January 1881

Issue Eight opens with a continuation of Henry C. Roman Nose’s journey from St. Augustine, to New York city and eventually Tarrytown, New York. The next page was an editorial on the importance of Hard Work, and how Indians should strive to work hard like White men do, along with a series of...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The School News (Vol. 2, No. 1)
June 1881

Page one opens with a letter from Lucius Aitson (Kiowa) to his father describing an illness he had that left him bed ridden for two weeks and how fond her is of English. Also on this page is a short bit from Nellie Robertson (Sioux) about the story of Moses. The next page had an article titled “...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The School News (Vol. 2, No. 12)
May 1882

The first article is Titled “Communicated” by Michael Burns (Apache). It discusses the opportunities Indians have to access education. On the same page Libbie Standing (Cheyenne) wrote about Indians fighting and Joe Big Wolf wrote his father challenging him to speak English better than his son....

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The School News (Vol. 2, No. 3)
August 1881

The August edition opens with an Article on the need to be useful the Carlisle Children feel, and how badly the writer felt when unable to work while sick. It continued onto page four. Page two brings Samuel Townsend (Pawnee) stepping down as editor with Charles Kihega (Iowa) taking his place....

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
Training of student nurses in school hospital, c.1910

Posed group of a doctor, staff nurse, and student nurses demonstrating how to use ether on a patient. This image was taken in the operating suite of the newer school hospital, construction of which was completed in 1908.

Format: Photographic Print, B&W
Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
Medical Discharge at Hampton and Recruitment for Carlisle
September 11, 1879

Letter from Richard Henry Pratt to Edwin J. Brooks regarding sick students discharged from the Hampton Institute. Pratt insists that too many boys were sent home, against his and the doctor's advice, and asserts that Spotted Tail and Red Cloud will be less interested in sending students to...

Format: Letters/Correspondence
Repository: National Archives and Records Administration
Urgent Requests for Funds for Chapel
December 30, 1879

Richard Henry Pratt writes two letters to officials at the Bureau of Indian Affairs, inquiring why needed funds for the construction of the chapel have not been provided. In the first letter, to Commissioner of Indian Affairs Ezra Hayt, Pratt notes that he has borrowed money to fill the...

Format: Financial Documents, Letters/Correspondence
Repository: National Archives and Records Administration
List of Supplies to Purchase
January 15, 1880

Richard Henry Pratt writes to Commissioner of Indian Affairs Ezra Hayt, requesting permission to purchase the listed supplies for the school. Some of the supplies had already been purchased for immediate use. The request includes construction materials, repairs to buildings and the ambulance,...

Format: Financial Documents, Letters/Correspondence
Repository: National Archives and Records Administration
Return of Medical Property and Transfer of Hospital Supplies for Fourth Quarter 1879
February 18, 1880

Richard Henry Pratt submits his return of medical property and transfer of hospital supplies for the fourth quarter of 1879. 

Format: Letters/Correspondence
Repository: National Archives and Records Administration

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