Assimilation of Native Americans

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The Morning Star (Vol. 5, No. 1)
August 1884

Page one opened with a poem on the Sioux, followed by a report on the “Present Aspects of the Indian Problem”. Page two asked “Who is responsible” for civilizing Indians as well as a small piece on an Australian who visited to learn about the Indians.

Page three had a continuation of the...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Morning Star (Vol. 5, No. 2)
September 1884

Page one started with a comparison photo of Mary Perry, John Menaul, and Bennie Thomas taken upon arrival at the school, and then one year later at their departure. Following the picture was the annual report, which was continued on page four. Page two suggested integrating Indian children into...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Morning Star (Vol. 5, No. 4)
October & November 1884

Page one had a poem titled “Lady Yeardley’s Guest” by Margaret Preston, followed by a report of the commissioner of Indian Affairs, which continued onto page two, and then onto page three, where it ended.

After the finish of the report, page three had articles titled “The Up-Thrust of...

Repository: Dickinson College Archives & Special Collections
The Morning Star (Vol. 5, No. 5)
December 1884

Page one started with a poem titled “The Indian’s Plea” by A.F.W., followed by a report on an organization made in 1822 to help get better rights for Indians. Included is their constitution and a list of the officers. This continued onto page two where the officer’s list was. Then there was an...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Morning Star (Vol. 5, No. 6)
January 1885

Page one opened with an extract from Hon. Byron M. Cutcheon speech, “Our Indian Policy,” originally given to the House of Representatives. Following that was “Secretary Teller in Favor of Schools.” Page two had a list of Bills and Resolutions relating to Indians that went before congress...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 2, No. 1)
August 13, 1886

The first page opened with a poem titled "English Speaking," that discouraged students from speaking their native languages. The page also included an article titled "How Miss Fisher went to Call on the President's Wife," that described Mrs. Cleveland's dress and the decor of White House rooms...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 2, No. 27)
February 11, 1887

The first page opened with the poem, "New Every Morning" by Susan Coolidge, followed by "Good Words from a Blind Young Man," which was a typewritten letter sent by Joseph Link, student of the Institution of the Blind, to Charles Wheelock (Oneida). There was also an article reprinted from the...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 2, No. 28)
February 18, 1887

The first page opened with the poem, "You Conquer Me, Me Conquer You" followed by a letter from Rev. Edward F. Wilson of the Shingwauk Home titled "An Indian School in Canada," which described Wilson’s report to the Indian Department of Canada on his visit to Carlisle, the Lincoln Institute and...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 3, No. 6)
September 16, 1887

The first page opened with the poem, "Bang Away," followed by the story of a Carlisle girl who was horrified to return home to unsanitary conditions, continued on page four. This appears to be the beginning segment of a serialized story of a girl who returned home to the challenges of putting...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 3, No. 8)
September 30, 1887

The first page opened with the poem, "Always Growing," followed by a continuation of the "Home Difficulties of a Young Girl" first offered in the Volume 3, Number 6 issue. In this episode, "Fanny" the returned Carlisle protagonist set out to put things right, finally recovering from her despair...

Repository: Dickinson College Archives & Special Collections
The Indian Helper (Vol. 3, No. 10)
October 14, 1887

The first page began with the poem, "Sermon in Rhyme," followed by Carlos Montezuma's "An Apache" in which he wrote from the Chicago Medical College telling his story of being kidnapped and raised in the white world. His account continued on page four. Page two included the account of the death...

Repository: Dickinson College Archives & Special Collections
The Indian Helper (Vol. 3, No. 12)
October 28, 1887

This issue began with the poem, "Live for Something," followed by the continuation of the series begun in Number 8 entitled "Home Difficulties of a Young Indian Girl," about Fanny, a Carlisle alumnus struggling to apply her new-found skills to home life.  The second page featured news items...

Repository: Dickinson College Archives & Special Collections
The Indian Helper (Vol. 3, No. 13)
November 4, 1887

The first page opened with the poem, "Do Thy Little; Do it Well," followed by a story by Aunt Martha called "Pawnee Medicine and an Indian Lodge," about Pawnee dances and medicine men.  The second page featured news about the steam printer, the return of Miss Ely, an open air concert by the band...

Repository: Dickinson College Archives & Special Collections
The Indian Helper (Vol. 3, No. 14)
November 11, 1887

The first page featured a poem "Work While You Work" followed by "A Pawnee Medicine-Dance" which continued the story from number 14 told by Aunt Martha about Pawnee medicine men and their dances. The second page had news of returned students whose terms at Carlisle were completed, including...

Repository: Dickinson College Archives & Special Collections
The Indian Helper (Vol. 3, No. 15)
November 18, 1887

The first page opened with the poem, "Work and Play," followed by a reprint of Dennison Wheelock's first prize essay entitled, "Is It Right for the Government to Stop the Teaching of Indian Languages in Reservation Schools," arguing for the affirmative. The second page featured news about...

Repository: Dickinson College Archives & Special Collections
The Indian Helper (Vol. 3, No. 17)
December 2, 1887

The first page opened with a poem, "Do the Right, Boys," followed by  a letter from Richard Yellow Robe, entitled "An Indian Boy's Experience: Written by Himself as a Composition and Read at our last Month's Exhibition" about his escape from the battle in which Custer was killed and his...

Repository: Dickinson College Archives & Special Collections
The Indian Helper (Vol. 3, No. 39)
May 11, 1888

The first page opened with a poem "Work a Blessing," followed by a letter "To the Republic Debating Society," from Nancy McIntosh (Creek) reporting her position as teacher in Eufala, Indian Territory. The last article on this page was entitled "Curiosity," which continued on page four. Page two...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 4, No. 13)
November 9,1888

The first page opened with an untitled poem that bore the first line, “No human life ere dawned on earth.” Then came an article titled “Judge Wright’s Talk,” that excerpted J.V. Wright’s discourse on the importance of the Indian students’ perseverance and the success of the Coeur d’Alene and...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 4, No. 43)
June 14, 1889

The first page opened with a poem "Wanted,” followed by a fictitious conversation titled “Sallie Lump-of-Mud and Little Miss Sensible Have a Talk.” The page ended with news from Harriet Elder (Nez Perce) and her agency, titled “This Was My Name When at School – Harriet M. Elder.” Page two...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 5, No. 8)
October 11, 1889

The first page opened with a poem by Bayard Taylor with the first line "Learn to live, and live to learn” followed by the fourth installment of the series titled “How An Indian Girl Might Tell Her Own Story if She Had the Chance: All Founded on Actual Observations of the Man-on-the-band-stand’s...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 5, No. 12)
November 8, 1889

The first page opened with a poem by E.G. titled "U.S.I.D.” followed by the next installment of the series titled “How An Indian Girl Might Tell Her Own Story if She Had the Chance: Founded on Actual Observations of the Man-on-the-band-stand’s Chief Clerk” (continued from the previous week). The...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 5, No. 18)
December 20, 1889

The first page opened with a poem titled "A Christmas Carol by Eleanor W.F. Bates in Home Magazine. Next came a new installment of the series titled “How An Indian Girl Might Tell Her Own Story if She Had the Chance: Founded on Actual Observations of the Man-on-the-band-stand’s Chief...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society

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