Assimilation of Native Americans

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The Indian Helper (Vol. 3, No. 13)
November 4, 1887

The first page opened with the poem, "Do Thy Little; Do it Well," followed by a story by Aunt Martha called "Pawnee Medicine and an Indian Lodge," about Pawnee dances and medicine men.  The second page featured news about the steam printer, the return of Miss Ely, an open air concert by the band...

Repository: Dickinson College Archives & Special Collections
The Indian Helper (Vol. 3, No. 14)
November 11, 1887

The first page featured a poem "Work While You Work" followed by "A Pawnee Medicine-Dance" which continued the story from number 14 told by Aunt Martha about Pawnee medicine men and their dances. The second page had news of returned students whose terms at Carlisle were completed, including...

Repository: Dickinson College Archives & Special Collections
The Indian Helper (Vol. 3, No. 15)
November 18, 1887

The first page opened with the poem, "Work and Play," followed by a reprint of Dennison Wheelock's first prize essay entitled, "Is It Right for the Government to Stop the Teaching of Indian Languages in Reservation Schools," arguing for the affirmative. The second page featured news about...

Repository: Dickinson College Archives & Special Collections
The Indian Helper (Vol. 3, No. 17)
December 2, 1887

The first page opened with a poem, "Do the Right, Boys," followed by  a letter from Richard Yellow Robe, entitled "An Indian Boy's Experience: Written by Himself as a Composition and Read at our last Month's Exhibition" about his escape from the battle in which Custer was killed and his...

Repository: Dickinson College Archives & Special Collections
The Indian Helper (Vol. 3, No. 39)
May 11, 1888

The first page opened with a poem "Work a Blessing," followed by a letter "To the Republic Debating Society," from Nancy McIntosh (Creek) reporting her position as teacher in Eufala, Indian Territory. The last article on this page was entitled "Curiosity," which continued on page four. Page two...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 3, No. 6)
September 16, 1887

The first page opened with the poem, "Bang Away," followed by the story of a Carlisle girl who was horrified to return home to unsanitary conditions, continued on page four. This appears to be the beginning segment of a serialized story of a girl who returned home to the challenges of putting...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 3, No. 8)
September 30, 1887

The first page opened with the poem, "Always Growing," followed by a continuation of the "Home Difficulties of a Young Girl" first offered in the Volume 3, Number 6 issue. In this episode, "Fanny" the returned Carlisle protagonist set out to put things right, finally recovering from her despair...

Repository: Dickinson College Archives & Special Collections
The Indian Helper (Vol. 4, No. 13)
November 9,1888

The first page opened with an untitled poem that bore the first line, “No human life ere dawned on earth.” Then came an article titled “Judge Wright’s Talk,” that excerpted J.V. Wright’s discourse on the importance of the Indian students’ perseverance and the success of the Coeur d’Alene and...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 4, No. 43)
June 14, 1889

The first page opened with a poem "Wanted,” followed by a fictitious conversation titled “Sallie Lump-of-Mud and Little Miss Sensible Have a Talk.” The page ended with news from Harriet Elder (Nez Perce) and her agency, titled “This Was My Name When at School – Harriet M. Elder.” Page two...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 5, No. 12)
November 8, 1889

The first page opened with a poem by E.G. titled "U.S.I.D.” followed by the next installment of the series titled “How An Indian Girl Might Tell Her Own Story if She Had the Chance: Founded on Actual Observations of the Man-on-the-band-stand’s Chief Clerk” (continued from the previous week). The...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 5, No. 18)
December 20, 1889

The first page opened with a poem titled "A Christmas Carol by Eleanor W.F. Bates in Home Magazine. Next came a new installment of the series titled “How An Indian Girl Might Tell Her Own Story if She Had the Chance: Founded on Actual Observations of the Man-on-the-band-stand’s Chief...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 5, No. 8)
October 11, 1889

The first page opened with a poem by Bayard Taylor with the first line "Learn to live, and live to learn” followed by the fourth installment of the series titled “How An Indian Girl Might Tell Her Own Story if She Had the Chance: All Founded on Actual Observations of the Man-on-the-band-stand’s...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Morning Star (Vol. 3, No. 12)
July 1883

Page one is dominated by small vignettes of various day-to-day events that happened at the school, including compliments on students works, stories of gifted flowers and visiting agents. Page two has the beginning of an article titled “A Visit to the Indian Territory – Our Returned Pupils” which...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Morning Star (Vol. 4, No. 10)
May 1884

Page one began with a quick lesson on applied grammar, followed by “Secretary Teller’s views upon Indian Education and statistical information about the school, including student numbers, tribes attending and clothes in the sewing room. Page two had a call for more Indian schools to be made, as...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Morning Star (Vol. 4, No. 11)
June 1884

Page One had a photograph of the parade grounds on campus, as well as a bit of history on the Indian school. Page two had a small, horrifying piece on whether leaving Indians alone to die of illness or physically murdering them is more humane. The page also had extracts from the Address of Gen....

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Morning Star (Vol. 4, No. 12)
July 1884

Page one had a poem titled “The Law of Liberty” followed by an article titled “The Republic in a Death Struggle with Ignorance” and comparison between the African and the Indian problem. Page two asked who was responsible for Indians having not fully “Christianized” and become “civil” and an...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Morning Star (Vol. 4, No. 4)
November 1883

Page one opened with “Annual Report of the Commissioner of Indian Affair” which includes pieces on education, reports of the training schools. The page finished with a small letter to Miss Semple. Page two had Capt. Pratt’s account of his Western Trip, as well as information on the number of...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Morning Star (Vol. 4, No. 5)
December 1883

Page one opened with an article titled “Strong Words for the Indians From Commissioner Price”, along with “A Plea for Civilized Indians”, “Two Pueblo Boys”, and “The Baby”. Page two had Captain Pratt’s account of his visit to the west. It also had comments from various chiefs on their opinion on...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Morning Star (Vol. 4, No. 6)
January 1884

Page one opened with “What the Honorable, The Secretary of the Interior says his Annual Report About Indian Education”, which included statistics on treaties made with the various tribes. Page two had a piece called “ Hindrances and Helps” as well as a piece on young women helping to raise money...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Morning Star (Vol. 4, No. 7)
February 1884

Page one opened with Proverb 11:23. Also on he page was “Educating The Indians”, and a Pueblo legend as told by a Pueblo student. Page two had story about a foolish farmer, as well as an important letter from an Indian Agent, and a piece on a conference at Lake Mohonk.

Page three had the...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Morning Star (Vol. 4, No. 8)
March 1884

Page one opened with “The Thoughts and Opinions of Indian Agents” which took up the entire page an continued onto page four. Page two had an article on caring for Indians and small pieces on enforced education, and the need for books and paper for school. Page three had the school items, which...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Morning Star (Vol. 4, No. 9)
April 1884

Page one had the speech Cap. Pratt gave at the National Convention of Superintendents of Education at Washington, D.C. He talked about how the solution to the “Indian Problem” was to give them all an education. Page two had an article on the relationship between the government and the Indian...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Morning Star (Vol. 5, No. 1)
August 1884

Page one opened with a poem on the Sioux, followed by a report on the “Present Aspects of the Indian Problem”. Page two asked “Who is responsible” for civilizing Indians as well as a small piece on an Australian who visited to learn about the Indians.

Page three had a continuation of the...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Morning Star (Vol. 5, No. 2)
September 1884

Page one started with a comparison photo of Mary Perry, John Menaul, and Bennie Thomas taken upon arrival at the school, and then one year later at their departure. Following the picture was the annual report, which was continued on page four. Page two suggested integrating Indian children into...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Morning Star (Vol. 5, No. 4)
October & November 1884

Page one had a poem titled “Lady Yeardley’s Guest” by Margaret Preston, followed by a report of the commissioner of Indian Affairs, which continued onto page two, and then onto page three, where it ended.

After the finish of the report, page three had articles titled “The Up-Thrust of...

Repository: Dickinson College Archives & Special Collections

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