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Eadle Keatah Toh (Vol. 1, No. 1)
January 1880

The first page opened with a report titled "THE INDIAN TRAINING SCHOOL," that described the progress of the school, its Christian methods, the work of the Florida boys preparing buildings for use, the importance of the town Sunday Schools, the school curriculum that emphasized farmwork for boys...

Repository: National Archives and Records Administration
Eadle Keatah Toh (Vol. 1, No. 9)
March 1881

Page one had a list of requests to the United States President from W. E. Dodge, Howard Crosby, John Hall, S. M. Moore, W m. C. Gray, S. It. Riggs, and T. M. Sinclair, making several requests, such as asking for titles to their land and for Indians to have more defined protection under the Law....

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
Eadle Keatah Toh (Vol. 2, No. 1)
August 1881

Page one opened with Lapi Oaye talking about the school system in America and how it is beneficial to Indian and while children alike. Page two had a bit on the humor of incorrectly spelled names, followed by an Article written by E.G.P. on increasing the time Indians spend in both office and...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
Eadle Keatah Toh (Vol. 2, No. 6)
January 1882

Page one had a single article on it, a memorial on Indian rights, education and homes. Page two had a continuation of the memorial and an article on Christmas. It talked about the food they ate in celebration and the decorations in the chapel. Page two also mentioned the death of Kate Ross (...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
Eadle Keatah Toh (Vol. 2, No. 8)
March 1882

Page one has a large picture of Carlisle students in their school uniforms for Sunday School, as well as an extract from a letter written by Bishop Hare. Page two has “The Inspiration of the Work”, which writes about how white people have rescued Indians and helped them to not be lazy. There was...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 1, No. 16)
November 27, 1885

The first page opened with a poem titled “Snow Brings Fun,” followed by instructions for “How to Write to Your Mother,” directed to a young man with instructions for how to reply to his mother who was pleading for his return back to his home agency. Page two opened with a series of news items...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 1, No. 21 & No. 22)
January 8, 1886

The first page opened with a poem titled “Smile Whenever You Can," followed by a lesson titled, "What Is Polite?" and a description of the life cycles of certain mammals. Page two featured the "Forty-Ninth Congress" civics lesson comparing government to the Indian school’s debating clubs in...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 1, No. 23)
January 15, 1886

The first page opened with a poem titled "I'll Put It Off" followed by "A True Story of a Boy Frozen to Death." Also found on that page was an article titled "Look Up!" which was reprinted from the Industrial School Journal, about overcoming the urge to steal. Page two continued with...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 1, No. 30)
March 5, 1886

The first page opened with a poem titled "Exhibition Night: By The-Man-on-the-Band-Stand's Wife." There were also several brief articles about high winds in Philadelphia, heavy snows in Quebec, the fate of a ship that ran aground during a voyage between Boston and Liverpool, a birthday party for...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 1, No. 35)
April 9, 1886

The first page opened with a poem titled "Spring,” followed by "How a Pawnee Got Ahead of a Cheyenne Chief: A Story as told by one of our Boys," in which a U.S. congressman’s position was chastised using an analogy of a Cheyenne-Pawnee skirmish. There is also a blurb about temperance on this...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 2, No. 1)
August 13, 1886

The first page opened with a poem titled "English Speaking," that discouraged students from speaking their native languages. The page also included an article titled "How Miss Fisher went to Call on the President's Wife," that described Mrs. Cleveland's dress and the decor of White House rooms...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 2, No. 18)
December 10, 1886

The first page opened with a poem titled "Much Depends on Your Aiming," about keeping to the straight path, followed by "A Boy Froze to Death While On Duty," about the effects of an ice storm on Lake Michigan followed by "Moved Again," in which the Man-on-the-band-stand opined that Indians who...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 2, No. 20)
December 24, 1886

The first page featured the school Christmas greeting that included a drawing of the Man-on-the-band-stand that took up the entire front page of the newspaper. Page two opened with an article titled "Christmas" that described the Fourth of July and Christmas as national holidays, followed by...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 2, No. 21)
December 31, 1886

The first page opened with a poem titled "A Happy New Year to You," followed by a poem called "Santa Claus at Home," about his return to the North Pole. The next article, "The Cold Water Man," was about the dangers of drinking beer, reprinted from Maryland Bulletin. Also on the page was...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 2, No. 28)
February 18, 1887

The first page opened with the poem, "You Conquer Me, Me Conquer You" followed by a letter from Rev. Edward F. Wilson of the Shingwauk Home titled "An Indian School in Canada," which described Wilson’s report to the Indian Department of Canada on his visit to Carlisle, the Lincoln Institute and...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 3, No. 43)
June 8, 1888

The first page opened with the poem, "What a Barrel of Whiskey Contains,” followed by an article titled “Welcome!” that reprinted Kish Hawkins’ (Cheyenne) address to a visiting group of Wilson College women. In the talk he described the Outing Program, industrial work, academic work and women’s...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 3, No. 47)
July 6, 1888

The first page opened with a poem by Sarah E. Eastman reprinted from “Golden Days,” titled “If! If!” followed by the reprinted letter from a Carlisle Indian School student on Outing called “She Wants a Higher Education.” The last piece on the page continues on the fourth page called “A Modern...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 4, No. 11)
October 26, 1888

The first page opens with an untitled poem. The next article titled “Peter Powlass,” contains a letter with news about events at the Oneida, Wisconsin Reservation written by former student, Peter Powlass. It is followed by “U.S. Congress,” that reported the schedule of the Fiftieth Congress....

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 4, No. 13)
November 9,1888

The first page opened with an untitled poem that bore the first line, “No human life ere dawned on earth.” Then came an article titled “Judge Wright’s Talk,” that excerpted J.V. Wright’s discourse on the importance of the Indian students’ perseverance and the success of the Coeur d’Alene and...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 4, No. 17)
December 7, 1888

This issue opened with a poem titled “HOW," by John Boyle O'Reilly, followed by news from a letter from Carlisle alumnus Samuel Townsend (Pawnee), a student at Marietta College. Page two included news items about Congress convening, Nancy Cornelius (Oneida) attending the Woman's National Indian...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 4, No. 28)
March 1, 1889

The first page began with a poem titled, “This Life is What We Make It,” followed by a letter from Samuel Townsend (Pawnee) about school life at Marietta College. The second page included news from letters from former students and an excerpted speech from Thomas Metoxen (Oneida).

Among...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 4, No. 29)
March 8, 1889

The first page opened with a poem "March" by Bessie Chandler followed by an article titled "Feasted By the Blind" which was an account of visiting students from the Pennsylvania Institution for the Instruction of the Blind who got a tour of the Indian school and gave an entertainment that...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 4, No. 36)
April 26, 1889

The first page opened with a poem "The Printer-Boy Tramp” by Will Carleton, followed by “Encouraging Prospects” about Luther Kuhns at the Pawnee Agency. Next came “A Man Who was not Afraid to Work” on how General Washington set an example for his corporal. Also on the page was an article titled...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 4, No. 51)
August 9, 1889

The first page opened with a poem "Willie’s First Boots” followed by “What Lawrence Learned,” about how Right Time and Right Place brought a boy success, reprinted from Wide Awake. Page two opened with a travelogue through California and Arizona to the Grand Canyon titled “Elevation –...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 5, No. 14)
November 22, 1889

The first page opened with a poem by E.G. titled "After Carlisle, What?” followed by the next installment of the series titled “How An Indian Girl Might Tell Her Own Story if She Had the Chance: Founded on Actual Observations of the Man-on-the-band-stand’s Chief Clerk” (continued from the...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society

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