Cumberland County Historical Society

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The Indian Helper (Vol. 3, No. 38)
May 4, 1888

The first page opened with a poem "Legend of the 'Forget-Me-Not, '" "From the Scrap-book of a subscriber;" followed by an article called "Happy Accidents," about the importance of self-help. Next came a piece that continued on the fourth page entitled "How Boys Can Make Money." Page two began...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 3, No. 39)
May 11, 1888

The first page opened with a poem "Work a Blessing," followed by a letter "To the Republic Debating Society," from Nancy McIntosh (Creek) reporting her position as teacher in Eufala, Indian Territory. The last article on this page was entitled "Curiosity," which continued on page four. Page two...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 3, No. 42)
June 1, 1888

The first page opened with a poem, "The Old Steam Mill," followed by a fictitious conversation between two Carlisle Indian School students, Tom and Ben discussing the merits of work and study. It continued on page four. Page two included news from Pine Ridge Agency, and of the Standing family’s...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 3, No. 43)
June 8, 1888

The first page opened with the poem, "What a Barrel of Whiskey Contains,” followed by an article titled “Welcome!” that reprinted Kish Hawkins’ (Cheyenne) address to a visiting group of Wilson College women. In the talk he described the Outing Program, industrial work, academic work and women’s...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 3, No. 44)
June 15, 1888

The first page opened with an untitled poem, followed by “A Letter from Mr. Standing: How He Finds Things in England,” a travel diary of the Standing Family’s visit to England. Page two included a report of “An Aged Friend,” and news about visits Dr. Given made to Outing students in Bucks County...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 3, No. 45)
June 22, 1888

The first page opened with a poem “Selected by Susan Longstreth,” titled “To My Dog ‘Blanco’” by J.G. Holland. The other feature on the first page was an account of “An Indian Girl on a Farm: She Enjoys a Holiday,” that described Adelia Lowe (Sioux) and Frances King’s (Quapaw) trip to Burlington...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 3, No. 46)
June 29, 1888

The first page opened with a poem selected “by Mrs. Pettinos,” titled “The Sun and the Wind,” followed by a conversation about the meaning of the 4th of July and how an Indian School student might be influenced to extend his time at the school instead of returning to the reservation. Page two...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 3, No. 47)
July 6, 1888

The first page opened with a poem by Sarah E. Eastman reprinted from “Golden Days,” titled “If! If!” followed by the reprinted letter from a Carlisle Indian School student on Outing called “She Wants a Higher Education.” The last piece on the page continues on the fourth page called “A Modern...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 3, No. 50)
July 27, 1888

The first page opened with the death notice for Katie Kinshone, one of the Apache babies. It was followed by a poem by Henry Sargent Blake called “Why Come They?” The next item was an article, “No Tobacco in Other Schools,” about the evils of tobacco use and the last piece on the page was an...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 3, No. 51)
August 3, 1888

The first page opened with an untitled selection, opening with the line, “A Man of kindness to his beast is kind,” followed by “A Day In London,” dated July 12, 1888, signed by “A Carlisler,” who is later revealed to be Miss Lowe, and continued on to the fourth page.  The report included a visit...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 3, No. 52)
August 10, 1888

The first page opened with the poem, “What Makes A Man,” followed by an article titled, “Interesting Observations At the Indians’ Own Home” reprinting a letter from Joshua Given (Kiowa) who described the social and political news from the Kiowa and Comanche Agency. He reported the activities of...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 4, No. 1)
August 17, 1888

The first page opened with the poem, “What the Flowers Said,” followed by an article reprinted from The Baltimorean, titled "Men Who Were Laughed At,” about how technologies were first spurned. Page two featured several news reports about the band, outing experiences, news from the...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 4, No. 3)
August 31, 1888

The first page opened with a poem, “Good Advice,” followed by a fictional account of a conversation titled “Two Carlisle Boys at Pine Ridge Talk Over the Sioux Bill,” in which two former students, Zack and Tim, discuss the merits of signing the Severalty Act which had been presented to the...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Red Man (Vol. 8, No. 10)
September 1888

A description of this document is not currently available.

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 4, No. 5)
September 14, 1888

The first page opened with a poem, “The Golden Keys,” followed by a letter from Richard Davis (Cheyenne) who lived in West Grove, PA and ran a dairy farm there. There was an article called “No Wonder Indians Get Along Slowly,” and news from Joseph Schweigman (Sioux) at the Rosebud Agency titled...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 4, No. 6)
September 21, 1888

The first page opened with an untitled poem by J. W. Burgess reprinted from Sunshine, followed by “Our Walnut Tree” about the Man-On-the-Band-Stand’s efforts to keep students from picking green walnuts. The second page began with “The Captain,” which described the speech Capt. Pratt...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 4, No. 7)
September 28, 1888

The first page opened with an untitled poem warning of the evils of debt, followed by “Eet, Kit-E-Ko Give It To Me: A True Story,” about fictional Aunt Martha’s exasperation after generously giving away all her potatoes to hungry Pawnee women. The story continued on page four. Page two featured...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Red Man (Vol. 8, No. 11)
October 1888

A description of this document is not currently available.

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 4, No. 8)
October 5, 1888

The first page opened with a poem “The Two Words,” followed by Lucy Jordan’s letter to the Man-On-The-Band-Stand titled “Carlisle A Bright Picture” in which she mused about her days’ past at Carlisle and life at home on the Stockbridge Reservation. Next came “A Budget of News from Eliza Bell” (...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 4, No. 9)
October 12, 1888

The first page opened with an untitled poem, with the first line “God Wants the Boys,” followed by anonymous advice “Be Inventive.” Next came two columns, “Girls Read This,” an exercise for good posture and “Boys Read This,” an exercise for good behavior. The news items on page two gave reports...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 4, No. 11)
October 26, 1888

The first page opens with an untitled poem. The next article titled “Peter Powlass,” contains a letter with news about events at the Oneida, Wisconsin Reservation written by former student, Peter Powlass. It is followed by “U.S. Congress,” that reported the schedule of the Fiftieth Congress....

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Red Man (Vol. 8, No. 12)
November 1888

A description of this document is not currently available.

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 4, No. 12)
November 2, 1888

The first page opened with the poem, “Little Helpers,” reprinted from the Sunday School Times. Next came a piece titled “Environment,” the answer to the previously posted word story, followed by “No Time to Read?” about the importance of reading which continued on the fourth page. Page...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 4, No. 13)
November 9,1888

The first page opened with an untitled poem that bore the first line, “No human life ere dawned on earth.” Then came an article titled “Judge Wright’s Talk,” that excerpted J.V. Wright’s discourse on the importance of the Indian students’ perseverance and the success of the Coeur d’Alene and...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 4, No. 14)
November 16, 1888

The first page opened with a poem, “Be Careful What You Say,” followed by “Indian Names,” on the origin of Indian names. Next came an article titled “Wanted, Something Inside,” about the value of persistence and perseverance, followed by small blurbs about the Christian population of Japan and...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society

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