The Morning Star (Vol. 5, No. 6)

The Morning Star (Vol. 5, No. 6)
Carlisle, PA
January 1885

Page one opened with an extract from Hon. Byron M. Cutcheon speech, “Our Indian Policy,” originally given to the House of Representatives. Following that was “Secretary Teller in Favor of Schools.” Page two had a list of Bills and Resolutions relating to Indians that went before congress recently. Also on Page two was a letter from a Carlisle girl to her friend talking about what she’s been doing at Carlisle. Also on page two was an article on dream that an Indian told their agent.

Page three had Senator Dawes’ thoughts on “Red Cloud’s Sioux and Their Agent,” an article published in Springfield Republican. After his comments there was an article on “Some Plain Facts” about the returned students to the Indian Manual Labor School at Pawnee Agency, Indian Territory. Page four had a piece on how the “old ship of Indian Life” has found its once open seas dried up by “the tempest of intelligence and improvement.” Also on page four was a report from a Cheyenne boy on how many young Indians still indulge in robbery and killing.

Page five had the School Items, which included Dr. Seabrook’s lecture and experiments on electricity, Ex. Governor Marmon of the Pueblo Laguna’s visit, and the death of Mabel Kelcusay, an Apache girl. Page five also had small pieces on successful surgery, the dangers of tobacco and what other Indian schools were doing. Page six had a plan by Patrick Henry to elevate the Indians, as well as “A Bill for the encouragement of marriages with Indians,” and a message from Governor Black Dog to the Osage Council.

Page seven had an article on the history of the Pueblos, as well as a poem from a confederate general and the account of an army officer on a prank pulled by a “brazen joker.” Page eight had quotes from students’ letters home as well as comments on how students were doing on the country farms. Page eight also had small pieces about Christmas and new year’s greetings.

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Cumberland County Historical Society