Indian Helper, The (1887-1900)

Displaying 101 - 125 of 682 records
The Indian Helper (Vol. 4, No. 1)
August 17, 1888

The first page opened with the poem, “What the Flowers Said,” followed by an article reprinted from The Baltimorean, titled "Men Who Were Laughed At,” about how technologies were first spurned. Page two featured several news reports about the band, outing experiences, news from the...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 4, No. 3)
August 31, 1888

The first page opened with a poem, “Good Advice,” followed by a fictional account of a conversation titled “Two Carlisle Boys at Pine Ridge Talk Over the Sioux Bill,” in which two former students, Zack and Tim, discuss the merits of signing the Severalty Act which had been presented to the...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 4, No. 4)
September 7, 1888

The first page opened with a poem, “Grasp the Nettle,” followed by a reprinted letter to Superintendent Pratt from Conrad Roubideaux (Sioux) titled “Conrad Didn’t Give Up the Ship,” in which he described the hardships of finding work on the reservation. Page two included news that Pratt was out...

Repository: Private Collection
The Indian Helper (Vol. 4, No. 5)
September 14, 1888

The first page opened with a poem, “The Golden Keys,” followed by a letter from Richard Davis (Cheyenne) who lived in West Grove, PA and ran a dairy farm there. There was an article called “No Wonder Indians Get Along Slowly,” and news from Joseph Schweigman (Sioux) at the Rosebud Agency titled...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 4, No. 6)
September 21, 1888

The first page opened with an untitled poem by J. W. Burgess reprinted from Sunshine, followed by “Our Walnut Tree” about the Man-On-the-Band-Stand’s efforts to keep students from picking green walnuts. The second page began with “The Captain,” which described the speech Capt. Pratt...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 4, No. 7)
September 28, 1888

The first page opened with an untitled poem warning of the evils of debt, followed by “Eet, Kit-E-Ko Give It To Me: A True Story,” about fictional Aunt Martha’s exasperation after generously giving away all her potatoes to hungry Pawnee women. The story continued on page four. Page two featured...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 4, No. 8)
October 5, 1888

The first page opened with a poem “The Two Words,” followed by Lucy Jordan’s letter to the Man-On-The-Band-Stand titled “Carlisle A Bright Picture” in which she mused about her days’ past at Carlisle and life at home on the Stockbridge Reservation. Next came “A Budget of News from Eliza Bell” (...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 4, No. 9)
October 12, 1888

The first page opened with an untitled poem, with the first line “God Wants the Boys,” followed by anonymous advice “Be Inventive.” Next came two columns, “Girls Read This,” an exercise for good posture and “Boys Read This,” an exercise for good behavior. The news items on page two gave reports...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 4, No. 11)
October 26, 1888

The first page opens with an untitled poem. The next article titled “Peter Powlass,” contains a letter with news about events at the Oneida, Wisconsin Reservation written by former student, Peter Powlass. It is followed by “U.S. Congress,” that reported the schedule of the Fiftieth Congress....

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 4, No. 12)
November 2, 1888

The first page opened with the poem, “Little Helpers,” reprinted from the Sunday School Times. Next came a piece titled “Environment,” the answer to the previously posted word story, followed by “No Time to Read?” about the importance of reading which continued on the fourth page. Page...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 4, No. 13)
November 9,1888

The first page opened with an untitled poem that bore the first line, “No human life ere dawned on earth.” Then came an article titled “Judge Wright’s Talk,” that excerpted J.V. Wright’s discourse on the importance of the Indian students’ perseverance and the success of the Coeur d’Alene and...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 4, No. 14)
November 16, 1888

The first page opened with a poem, “Be Careful What You Say,” followed by “Indian Names,” on the origin of Indian names. Next came an article titled “Wanted, Something Inside,” about the value of persistence and perseverance, followed by small blurbs about the Christian population of Japan and...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 4, No. 15)
November 23, 1888

The first page opened with a poem titled “IT PAYS," followed by a piece called "THANKSGIVING!" that reminded readers to be thankful. Next came "REV MR. WILSON EXPLAINS HIS 'MONKEY ADDRESS,'" which was a letter to the Editor from Edward Wilson from Darlington, Indian Territory dated Nov. 13, 1888...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 4, No. 16)
November 30, 1888

The first page opened with a poem, “Judge Wright’s Farewell: Read By Him Before Our Students Last Saturday Night,” followed by “A Boy Who Could Be Trusted,” about an unnamed boy who revealed news of Lee’s troops marching to Gettysburg. Next came a reprint of a letter that told of the good work...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 4, No. 17)
December 7, 1888

This issue opened with a poem titled “HOW," by John Boyle O'Reilly, followed by news from a letter from Carlisle alumnus Samuel Townsend (Pawnee), a student at Marietta College. Page two included news items about Congress convening, Nancy Cornelius (Oneida) attending the Woman's National Indian...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 4, No. 18)
December 14, 1888

The first page opened with a poem titled “How To Make Up,” followed by an article reprinted from The Sabbath School Visitor titled “Playthings of the Indian Children.” Next came a letter from Nancy Cornelius (Oneida) titled “Items of Interest From Nancy Cornelius,” which was sent from the...

Repository: Dickinson College Archives & Special Collections
The Indian Helper (Vol. 4, No. 19)
December 21, 1888

The first page opened with a poem titled “GOD'S CHRISTMAS GIFTS," by Dwight Weldon. Also on the page were numerous Christmas articles, including a piece about the spirit of giving called "A MERRY CHRISTMAS! A HAPPY NEW YEAR!" and a reprint from Sunshine about the meaning of A.D. 1888....

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 4, No. 20)
January 4, 1889

The first page opened with a poem titled “Look Up!” followed by a report that described, “Our Christmas?” and detailed the holiday events celebrated at the Indian School that included Santa Claus’ visit, who filled students’ hats and stockings with fruit, nuts and candy, and concluded with a...

Repository: Dickinson College Archives & Special Collections
The Indian Helper (Vol. 4, No. 21)
January 11, 1889

The first page opened with a poem titled “?” in the shape of a question mark followed by a bit by A-Te-Ka called “A Capful of Prairie Chickens,” in which she described the process of surrogate prairie chicken eggs that perished after being hatched by a domestic chicken. Page two contained short...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 4, No. 22)
January 18, 1889

The first page opened with a poem titled “Do We All?” followed by an article, “Do You Want to Get Rich?” about the value of saving little things. The next article, “Dr. Jackson at Our Missionary Meeting,” described the work of Sheldon Jackson among the Metlakahtla boys at the Sitka Industrial...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 4, No. 24)
February 1, 1889

The first page began with an untitled poem that opened with the first line “We can never be too careful,” followed by “Which Would You Rather Be a Spider or a Fly? / The White Man Like a Spider,” an account of Mr. Seger’s description of the idiosyncrasies of language translation. It continued on...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 4, No. 25)
February 8, 1889

The first page began with a poem titled “Do Your Best,” followed by “The Man-On-the-Band-Stand and a Stranger,” which described the “old gentleman’s” effort to thwart the hiring of an Outing student who was careless with arithmetic. It continued on page four. Page two began with “A Manly...

Repository: Dickinson College Archives & Special Collections
The Indian Helper (Vol. 4, No. 26)
February 15, 1889

The first page began with an untitled poem that began with the first line, “Waste not moments, no, nor words,” followed by A-Te-Ka’s letter to the Man-on-the-band-stand titled “It Took Eight Years to Discover a Mistake.” The letter recalled a December 1881 article on early student art work from...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 4, No. 27)
February 22, 1889

The first page began with the heading, “February 22,” followed by poems and articles about George Washington and his birthday. Also on the page was a piece called “Do Indian Boys Have It?” about the pitfalls of self-conceit. Page two included many small articles that included an update of area...

Repository: Dickinson College Archives & Special Collections
The Indian Helper (Vol. 4, No. 28)
March 1, 1889

The first page began with a poem titled, “This Life is What We Make It,” followed by a letter from Samuel Townsend (Pawnee) about school life at Marietta College. The second page included news from letters from former students and an excerpted speech from Thomas Metoxen (Oneida).

Among...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society

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