Paisano, Mary

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Cemetery Stock Image

Cemetery information and mortuary documents related to Mary Paisano, a member of the Pueblo Nation.

Mary Paisano and Willie H. Paisano [version 1], c. 1885

Studio portrait of Mary Paisano and her brother, Willie H. Paisano, both are wearing school uniforms. 

Format: Glass Plate Negative
Repository: National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Mary Paisano and Willie H. Paisano [version 2], c.1885

Studio portrait of Mary Paisano and her brother, Willie H. Paisano, both wearing school uniforms.

Format: Photographic Print, B&W
Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
Mary Paisano Student Information Card

Student information card of Mary Paisano, a member of the Pueblo Nation, who entered the school on August 24, 1884 and died on April 28, 1890. She was buried in the cemetery on the school grounds. 

Repository: National Archives and Records Administration
Mary Paisano Student Information Card

Student information card of Mary (here May) Paisano, a member of the Pueblo Nation, who entered the school on August 24, 1884 and departed on April 28, 1890. The student died at Carlisle and is buried in the school cemetery.

Repository: National Archives and Records Administration
Mary Perry Student File

Student file of Mary Perry, a member of the Pueblo (Laguna) Nation, who entered the school on July 31, 1880, and ultimately departed on June 28, 1886. The student did not attend the school continuously, but left and reentered. The file contains student information cards, former student response...

Repository: National Archives and Records Administration
Mary Perry Student Information Card

Student information card of Mary Perry, a member of the Pueblo Nation, who entered the school on July 31, 1880 and departed on June 17, 1884. The file indicates Perry was married and living in Casa Blanca, New Mexico in 1913.

Repository: National Archives and Records Administration
The Indian Helper (Vol. 4, No. 33)
April 5, 1889

The first page began with a poem titled, “The Tongue,” followed by the Man-on-the-band-stand’s discussion in “Never Before,” that explained that a horde of boys would be marching east toward opportunity but a horde of boys would be marching west toward degradation, which he described as “evil...

Repository: Dickinson College Archives & Special Collections
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