Man-on-the-Band-Stand

Primary tabs

Displaying 26 - 47 of 47 records
The Indian Helper (Vol. 3, No. 38)
May 4, 1888

The first page opened with a poem "Legend of the 'Forget-Me-Not, '" "From the Scrap-book of a subscriber;" followed by an article called "Happy Accidents," about the importance of self-help. Next came a piece that continued on the fourth page entitled "How Boys Can Make Money." Page two began...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 3, No. 45)
June 22, 1888

The first page opened with a poem “Selected by Susan Longstreth,” titled “To My Dog ‘Blanco’” by J.G. Holland. The other feature on the first page was an account of “An Indian Girl on a Farm: She Enjoys a Holiday,” that described Adelia Lowe (Sioux) and Frances King’s (Quapaw) trip to Burlington...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 3, No. 49)
July 20, 1888

The first page opened with the poem “Be True” followed by an article titled “A Carlisle Teacher on the Big Ocean,” about a trip aboard the Steamer Aurania dated July 6th, 1888 written for the Man-on-the-band-stand by “A Carlisler,” aka Miss Lowe. The article concluded on the fourth page. Page...

Repository: Dickinson College Archives & Special Collections
The Indian Helper (Vol. 3, No. 5)
September 9, 1887

The first page opened with a short poem followed by a  conversation continued from previous weeks between Marianna Burgess and the Man-on-the-band-stand describing her recruitment trip among the Rosebud and Pine Ridge Sioux. Page two reported contents of letters from student Josephine Bordeaux (...

Repository: Dickinson College Archives & Special Collections
The Indian Helper (Vol. 3, No. 6)
September 16, 1887

The first page opened with the poem, "Bang Away," followed by the story of a Carlisle girl who was horrified to return home to unsanitary conditions, continued on page four. This appears to be the beginning segment of a serialized story of a girl who returned home to the challenges of putting...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 3, No. 8)
September 30, 1887

The first page opened with the poem, "Always Growing," followed by a continuation of the "Home Difficulties of a Young Girl" first offered in the Volume 3, Number 6 issue. In this episode, "Fanny" the returned Carlisle protagonist set out to put things right, finally recovering from her despair...

Repository: Dickinson College Archives & Special Collections
The Indian Helper (Vol. 4, No. 20)
January 4, 1889

The first page opened with a poem titled “Look Up!” followed by a report that described, “Our Christmas?” and detailed the holiday events celebrated at the Indian School that included Santa Claus’ visit, who filled students’ hats and stockings with fruit, nuts and candy, and concluded with a...

Repository: Dickinson College Archives & Special Collections
The Indian Helper (Vol. 4, No. 25)
February 8, 1889

The first page began with a poem titled “Do Your Best,” followed by “The Man-On-the-Band-Stand and a Stranger,” which described the “old gentleman’s” effort to thwart the hiring of an Outing student who was careless with arithmetic. It continued on page four. Page two began with “A Manly...

Repository: Dickinson College Archives & Special Collections
The Indian Helper (Vol. 4, No. 26)
February 15, 1889

The first page began with an untitled poem that began with the first line, “Waste not moments, no, nor words,” followed by A-Te-Ka’s letter to the Man-on-the-band-stand titled “It Took Eight Years to Discover a Mistake.” The letter recalled a December 1881 article on early student art work from...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 4, No. 31)
March 22, 1889

The first page began with a poem titled, “True Heroism,” followed by a fictional conversation among two Indian School students, Tom and Phil as reported by the Man-On-The-Band-Stand. In the moralizing story, continued on the fourth page, Phil sets a good example by keeping the Outing System...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 4, No. 33)
April 5, 1889

The first page began with a poem titled, “The Tongue,” followed by the Man-on-the-band-stand’s discussion in “Never Before,” that explained that a horde of boys would be marching east toward opportunity but a horde of boys would be marching west toward degradation, which he described as “evil...

Repository: Dickinson College Archives & Special Collections
The Indian Helper (Vol. 4, No. 36)
April 26, 1889

The first page opened with a poem "The Printer-Boy Tramp” by Will Carleton, followed by “Encouraging Prospects” about Luther Kuhns at the Pawnee Agency. Next came “A Man Who was not Afraid to Work” on how General Washington set an example for his corporal. Also on the page was an article titled...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 4, No. 49)
July 26, 1889

The first page opened with a Longfellow poem "The Ladder of St. Augustine” followed by James Black Hawk’s letter about the Fourth of July at Pine Ridge Agency titled “In the Right Spirit.” Page one also contained “Doing His Duty,” about how a seemingly unrecognized worker was promoted because of...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 4, No. 51)
August 9, 1889

The first page opened with a poem "Willie’s First Boots” followed by “What Lawrence Learned,” about how Right Time and Right Place brought a boy success, reprinted from Wide Awake. Page two opened with a travelogue through California and Arizona to the Grand Canyon titled “Elevation –...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 4, No. 6)
September 21, 1888

The first page opened with an untitled poem by J. W. Burgess reprinted from Sunshine, followed by “Our Walnut Tree” about the Man-On-the-Band-Stand’s efforts to keep students from picking green walnuts. The second page began with “The Captain,” which described the speech Capt. Pratt...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 4, No. 8)
October 5, 1888

The first page opened with a poem “The Two Words,” followed by Lucy Jordan’s letter to the Man-On-The-Band-Stand titled “Carlisle A Bright Picture” in which she mused about her days’ past at Carlisle and life at home on the Stockbridge Reservation. Next came “A Budget of News from Eliza Bell” (...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 5, No. 11)
November 1, 1889

The first page opened with a poem by Ella Wheeler with the first line "Oh What Am I but an Engine Shod” followed by the next installment of the series titled “How An Indian Girl Might Tell Her Own Story if She Had the Chance: Founded on Actual Observations of the Man-on-the-band-stand’s Chief...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 5, No. 12)
November 8, 1889

The first page opened with a poem by E.G. titled "U.S.I.D.” followed by the next installment of the series titled “How An Indian Girl Might Tell Her Own Story if She Had the Chance: Founded on Actual Observations of the Man-on-the-band-stand’s Chief Clerk” (continued from the previous week). The...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 5, No. 14)
November 22, 1889

The first page opened with a poem by E.G. titled "After Carlisle, What?” followed by the next installment of the series titled “How An Indian Girl Might Tell Her Own Story if She Had the Chance: Founded on Actual Observations of the Man-on-the-band-stand’s Chief Clerk” (continued from the...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 5, No. 15)
November 29, 1889

The first page opened with a query titled "Who is that Man-on-the-band-stand?” followed by E.G.’s poem, “The Man-on-the-band-stand.” Next came a new installment of the series titled “How An Indian Girl Might Tell Her Own Story if She Had the Chance: Founded on Actual Observations of the Man-on-...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 5, No. 5)
September 20, 1889

The first page opened with a poem "The Singer’s Alms: An Incident in the Life of the Great Tenor, Mario” by Henry Abbey, followed by the first installment in a series of articles written by the Man-on-the-Band-Stand about a Pueblo girl named Mollie. These stories were later published in book...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 5, No. 7)
October 4, 1889

The first page opened with a poem "Bear It in Mind” followed by the third installment of the series titled “How An Indian Girl Might Tell Her Own Story if She Had the Chance: All Founded on Actual Observations of the Man-on-the-band-stand’s Chief Clerk” which continued on the fourth page. Page...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society

Pages

Subscribe to Man-on-the-Band-Stand