Kinshone, Katie

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Kate Kinzhuna and Eunice Suisson (pose #1) [version 2], 1888

Studio portrait of infants Kate Kinzhuna and Eunice Suisson. 

The handwritten note reads: Kate Irvine Kinghune and Eunice Suison

This image is believed to have been taken in February, 1888. Kate was the daughter of students Hulda and Arnold Kinzhuna. Eunice was the...

Format: Photographic Print, B&W
Repository: Dickinson College Archives & Special Collections
Cemetery Stock Image

Cemetery information and mortuary documents related to Katie Kinzhuna, a member of the Apache Nation.

Note: While the documents presented here spell the surname for this individual as “Kinshone,” documents for their parents spell the surname as “Kinzhuna.”

Note: Based on the...

The Indian Helper (Vol. 3, No. 14)
November 11, 1887

The first page featured a poem "Work While You Work" followed by "A Pawnee Medicine-Dance" which continued the story from number 14 told by Aunt Martha about Pawnee medicine men and their dances. The second page had news of returned students whose terms at Carlisle were completed, including...

Repository: Dickinson College Archives & Special Collections
The Indian Helper (Vol. 3, No. 49)
July 20, 1888

The first page opened with the poem “Be True” followed by an article titled “A Carlisle Teacher on the Big Ocean,” about a trip aboard the Steamer Aurania dated July 6th, 1888 written for the Man-on-the-band-stand by “A Carlisler,” aka Miss Lowe. The article concluded on the fourth page. Page...

Repository: Dickinson College Archives & Special Collections
The Indian Helper (Vol. 3, No. 50)
July 27, 1888

The first page opened with the death notice for Katie Kinshone, one of the Apache babies. It was followed by a poem by Henry Sargent Blake called “Why Come They?” The next item was an article, “No Tobacco in Other Schools,” about the evils of tobacco use and the last piece on the page was an...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 3, No. 9)
October 7, 1887

Page one opened with the poem, "The Child's Mission," followed by a report called "Rev. Peter Owaha Matthews Speaks to Our School," which was continued on the fourth page. It was the account of an assimilated Indian and the trials he overcame  to become a successful, educated professional. Page...

Repository: Dickinson College Archives & Special Collections
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