Davis, Richenda

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Mary Davis and Richenda Davis, c.1892

Studio portrait of Mary Davis and Richenda Davis, children of school employees and former students Richard Davis and Nellie Aspenall Davis. 

Note: Mary and Richenda were not enrolled as students. 

Format: Photographic Print, B&W
Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
Richard Davis, Nellie Aspenall, and their children [version 1], c. 1891

Studio portrait of Richard Davis and his wife, Nellie Aspenall Davis, with their two daughters, Richenda and Mary. Richard and Nellie were former students who married at the school and became staff members. Their daughters were not enrolled at the school. 

The handwritten note reads:...

Format: Photographic Print, B&W
Repository: Dickinson College Archives & Special Collections
Richard Davis, Nellie Aspenall, and their children [version 2], c. 1891

The caption reads: RICHARD DAVIS, CHEYENNE.

The printed note reads: Born 1867 at Sand Creek, Col., entered Carlisle 1879; learned the Printers' trade.  In 1888, married Nannie Aspenall, a Pawnee girl, at Carlisle, and worked for a Penna. farmer engages in raising...

Format: Photographic Print, B&W
Repository: National Archives and Records Administration
Richenda Davis, Mary Davis, and Esther Davis, c.1893

Studio portrait of two small children with an infant. There is a caption written at a later date, probably by Cumberland County Historical Society staff, that identifies them as the children of Indian School staff members (and former students) Richard Davis and Nellie Aspenall Davis. That makes...

Format: Photographic Print, B&W
Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 4, No. 22)
January 18, 1889

The first page opened with a poem titled “Do We All?” followed by an article, “Do You Want to Get Rich?” about the value of saving little things. The next article, “Dr. Jackson at Our Missionary Meeting,” described the work of Sheldon Jackson among the Metlakahtla boys at the Sitka Industrial...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 4, No. 27)
February 22, 1889

The first page began with the heading, “February 22,” followed by poems and articles about George Washington and his birthday. Also on the page was a piece called “Do Indian Boys Have It?” about the pitfalls of self-conceit. Page two included many small articles that included an update of area...

Repository: Dickinson College Archives & Special Collections
The Indian Helper (Vol. 4, No. 33)
April 5, 1889

The first page began with a poem titled, “The Tongue,” followed by the Man-on-the-band-stand’s discussion in “Never Before,” that explained that a horde of boys would be marching east toward opportunity but a horde of boys would be marching west toward degradation, which he described as “evil...

Repository: Dickinson College Archives & Special Collections
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