Sioux

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The Indian Helper (Vol. 4, No. 3)
August 31, 1888

The first page opened with a poem, “Good Advice,” followed by a fictional account of a conversation titled “Two Carlisle Boys at Pine Ridge Talk Over the Sioux Bill,” in which two former students, Zack and Tim, discuss the merits of signing the Severalty Act which had been presented to the...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 4, No. 11)
October 26, 1888

The first page opens with an untitled poem. The next article titled “Peter Powlass,” contains a letter with news about events at the Oneida, Wisconsin Reservation written by former student, Peter Powlass. It is followed by “U.S. Congress,” that reported the schedule of the Fiftieth Congress....

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 4, No. 22)
January 18, 1889

The first page opened with a poem titled “Do We All?” followed by an article, “Do You Want to Get Rich?” about the value of saving little things. The next article, “Dr. Jackson at Our Missionary Meeting,” described the work of Sheldon Jackson among the Metlakahtla boys at the Sitka Industrial...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 4, No. 24)
February 1, 1889

The first page began with an untitled poem that opened with the first line “We can never be too careful,” followed by “Which Would You Rather Be a Spider or a Fly? / The White Man Like a Spider,” an account of Mr. Seger’s description of the idiosyncrasies of language translation. It continued on...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 4, No. 37)
May 3, 1889

The first page began with a poem titled, “from The Memories of the Past and the Duties of the Present,” by John W. Woodside, followed by a reprint of a letter from former student Clarence Three Stars (Sioux) that reported conditions from his home titled “A Newsy Letter from Pine Ridge Agency: By...

Repository: Dickinson College Archives & Special Collections
The Indian Helper (Vol. 4, No. 39)
May 17, 1889

The first page began with a poem titled “Listen,” reprinted from Harper’s Bazaar, followed by the publication of a letter received from Dolly Gould (Nez Perce) on her work at the Ft. Lapwai School under the title “Appreciation.” Felix Iron Eagle Feather’s (Sioux) letter from his Outing...

Repository: Dickinson College Archives & Special Collections
The Indian Helper (Vol. 4, No. 44)
June 21, 1889

The first page opened with a poem by Fannie Bolton titled “It is Time,” followed by “The Experience of a Bull: A Child’s Version of the Recent Flood at Lewistown,” followed by “A Busy Indian Boy in the Country” which was Wallace Scott’s (Pueblo) description of his farm experience in Bucks County...

Repository: Dickinson College Archives & Special Collections
The Indian Helper (Vol. 4, No. 49)
July 26, 1889

The first page opened with a Longfellow poem "The Ladder of St. Augustine” followed by James Black Hawk’s letter about the Fourth of July at Pine Ridge Agency titled “In the Right Spirit.” Page one also contained “Doing His Duty,” about how a seemingly unrecognized worker was promoted because of...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 4, No. 51)
August 9, 1889

The first page opened with a poem "Willie’s First Boots” followed by “What Lawrence Learned,” about how Right Time and Right Place brought a boy success, reprinted from Wide Awake. Page two opened with a travelogue through California and Arizona to the Grand Canyon titled “Elevation –...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 5, No. 5)
September 20, 1889

The first page opened with a poem "The Singer’s Alms: An Incident in the Life of the Great Tenor, Mario” by Henry Abbey, followed by the first installment in a series of articles written by the Man-on-the-Band-Stand about a Pueblo girl named Mollie. These stories were later published in book...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 5, No. 18)
December 20, 1889

The first page opened with a poem titled "A Christmas Carol by Eleanor W.F. Bates in Home Magazine. Next came a new installment of the series titled “How An Indian Girl Might Tell Her Own Story if She Had the Chance: Founded on Actual Observations of the Man-on-the-band-stand’s Chief...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
Souvenir of the Carlisle Indian School, 1902
1902

A souvenir booklet from the Carlisle Indian School, published for their 23rd year.  A short description of the aims and goals of the school is presented.  Images of students as they first arrived, as well as important visiting chiefs, are given, as are before and after images including those of...

Repository: Dickinson College Archives & Special Collections
The Indian Industrial School, Carlisle, Pa: 23rd Year
1902

A booklet of information and photographs assembled by the Carlisle Indian School for their 23rd year, circa 1902.  Includes a short history of the school and the town and school demographic information.  Includes pictures of arriving students, students during classroom and extracurricular...

Repository: Dickinson College Archives & Special Collections
Agnes (White Cow) and Ernest (Knocks Off), c.1879

Portrait of Agnes (White Cow) and Ernest (Knocks Off) posed on the steps of the bandstand on the school grounds.

Format: Photographic Print, B&W
Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
Andrew (His Shield), Paul Black Bear (Makes Himself Run), and Baldwin Blue Horse (Takes His Own) [version 1], 1879

Portrait of Andrew (His Shield), Paul Black Bear (Makes Himself Run), and Baldwin Blue Horse (Takes His Own) posed on the bandstand on the school grounds. One student is wearing a school uniform; the other two are in non-native dress. This photo was probably taken very close to their arrival on...

Format: Photographic Print, B&W
Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
Andrew (His Shield), Paul Black Bear (Makes Himself Run), and Baldwin Blue Horse (Takes His Own) [version 2], 1879

Portrait of Andrew (His Shield), Paul Black Bear (Makes Himself Run), and Baldwin Blue Horse (Takes His Own) posed on the bandstand on the school grounds. One student is wearing a school uniform; the other two are in in non-native clothing. This photo was probably taken close to their arrival on...

Format: Stereograph
Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
Group portrait of nine Sioux students, c.1879

Portrait of nine Sioux students posed next to one of the school buildings. The students are Edward Little (Behind), James (White Man), George Hollow Horned Bear (Little Man), George Hollow Horned Bear (Little Man), Bernard (Hawk Charging Daylight), David (Kills Without Warning), Horace (White...

Format: Photographic Print, B&W
Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
Marshall Bad Milk (Little Wolf), Alvan (One That Kills Horse), Austin Holy Bear (Wind Blows), and Horace (White Whirlwind), c.1879

Outdoor portrait of Marshall Bad Milk (Little Wolf), Alvan (One That Kills Horse), Austin Holy Bear (Wind Blows), and Horace (White Whirlwind) posed in front of the bandstand on the school grounds. 

Format: Photographic Print, B&W
Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
First Party of Students, 1879

The caption reads: FIRST PARTY EIGHTY TWO SIOUX ARRIVED AT CARLISLE OCT. 6, 1879.

This image appears in The Indian Industrial School Carlisle, PA: 23rd Year (Carlisle, PA: 1902).

Format: Photograph, Reproduction
Repository: Dickinson College Archives & Special Collections
Sioux girls arrive in Carlisle, 1879

This caption reads: FIRST SIOUX GIRLS – AS THEY CAME TO CARLISLE   OCT. 6TH, 1879.

This image appears in John N. Choate's Souvenir of the Carlisle Indian School (Carlisle, PA: J. N. Choate, 1902).

Format: Photograph, Reproduction
Repository: Dickinson College Archives & Special Collections
Cook and Daughter, c.1880

The handwritten caption reads: Cook - and. Daughter -

His daughter is student Grace Cook. 

Format: Photographic Print, B&W
Repository: Dickinson College Archives & Special Collections
Cook with his daughter Grace Cook, c.1880

Cook, in native clothing, and his daughter, Grace Cook, in non-native clothing.

Format: Photographic Print, B&W
Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
David Blue Teeth and Hope Blue Teeth, c.1880

Studio portrait of David Blue Teeth (standing) and his sister Hope Blue Teeth (seated). David is wearing a school uniform and Hope is in non-native dress. 

Format: Photographic Print, B&W
Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
Fanny and Dora, c.1880

Studio portrait of Fanny and Dora both wearing school uniforms.

Format: Glass Plate Negative
Repository: National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Hattie Long Wolf, c.1880

Studio portrait of Hattie Long Wolf (Hattie Porcupine) wearing school uniform.

Format: Glass Plate Negative
Repository: National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution

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