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Descriptive Statements of Pupils from Omaha and Winnebago Agency to Grant, Carlisle, and Lincoln Schools, 1891
August 1, 1891 - October 5, 1891

These materials include descriptive statements of students for individuals transferred from the Omaha and Winnebago Agency to the Grant Institute in Genoa, Nebraska; the Lincoln Institute in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; and the Carlisle Indian School.

Format: Legal and Government Documents
Repository: National Archives and Records Administration
The Indian Helper (Vol. 1, No. 21 & No. 22)
January 8, 1886

The first page opened with a poem titled “Smile Whenever You Can," followed by a lesson titled, "What Is Polite?" and a description of the life cycles of certain mammals. Page two featured the "Forty-Ninth Congress" civics lesson comparing government to the Indian school’s debating clubs in...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 2, No. 28)
February 18, 1887

The first page opened with the poem, "You Conquer Me, Me Conquer You" followed by a letter from Rev. Edward F. Wilson of the Shingwauk Home titled "An Indian School in Canada," which described Wilson’s report to the Indian Department of Canada on his visit to Carlisle, the Lincoln Institute and...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 3, No. 33)
March 30, 1888

The first page opened with the poem, " A Proverb," followed by Jemima Wheelock's (Oneida) report of "Our Wilmington Trip," about a group of students traveling to Delaware where they stayed with families before they headed to Philadelphia with Capt. Pratt and Miss Leverett.  They visited John...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 3, No. 38)
May 4, 1888

The first page opened with a poem "Legend of the 'Forget-Me-Not, '" "From the Scrap-book of a subscriber;" followed by an article called "Happy Accidents," about the importance of self-help. Next came a piece that continued on the fourth page entitled "How Boys Can Make Money." Page two began...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 3, No. 46)
June 29, 1888

The first page opened with a poem selected “by Mrs. Pettinos,” titled “The Sun and the Wind,” followed by a conversation about the meaning of the 4th of July and how an Indian School student might be influenced to extend his time at the school instead of returning to the reservation. Page two...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
The Indian Helper (Vol. 3, No. 9)
October 7, 1887

Page one opened with the poem, "The Child's Mission," followed by a report called "Rev. Peter Owaha Matthews Speaks to Our School," which was continued on the fourth page. It was the account of an assimilated Indian and the trials he overcame  to become a successful, educated professional. Page...

Repository: Dickinson College Archives & Special Collections
The Indian Helper (Vol. 4, No. 6)
September 21, 1888

The first page opened with an untitled poem by J. W. Burgess reprinted from Sunshine, followed by “Our Walnut Tree” about the Man-On-the-Band-Stand’s efforts to keep students from picking green walnuts. The second page began with “The Captain,” which described the speech Capt. Pratt...

Repository: Cumberland County Historical Society
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